AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletin

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-025

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Listen In To Radar Observations of Near-Earth Asteroid 2004 BL86
* SKN on OSCAR Best Fist Nominations Due
* Upcoming ARISS Contact
* Containerized Satellite Survey
* Search for NASA Educational Resources With New Search Tool

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-025.01
ANS-025 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 025.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
January 25, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-025.01

Listen In To Radar Observations of Near-Earth Asteroid 2004 BL86

On 2015 January 26, the near-Earth asteroid 2004 BL86 will pass within 0.008 AU
of Earth (3.1 times as far away as the Moon).  This will be the closest approach
to Earth by this asteroid for at least the next 240 years.

As part of an extensive campaign of radar observations to learn about
BL86’s shape, spin state, and surface; and to refine knowledge of its
trajectory; the Arecibo Observatory’s S-band planetary radar plans to illuminate
the asteroid with a continuous-wave signal over 2015 January 27 03:45 – 04:00
UTC.  Over that time, BL86’s radar echo will be received by elements of the Very
Long Baseline Array and the Very Large Array in New Mexico.  Anyone with an
antenna and receiver capable of detecting the echo is welcome to listen in.

BL86 will be above the horizon for most observers in North and South America,
and for some parts of western Europe and western Africa. To readily detect its
radar echo, observers should have an antenna with an effective collecting area
of at least 10 square meters. BL86 will be moving rapidly across the sky.  Over
Jan 27 03:45 – 04:00, it will move by ~0.5º.  The asteroid’s exact position on
the sky will depend on where it is observed from as well as the time, but will
be near (RA,Dec) = (130º,+17º).  A current ephemeris can be obtained from JPL’s
Horizons system:
http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/?horizons.

The Arecibo transmission will be tuned to give a nominal echo center frequency
of exactly 2380 MHz at geocenter.  Without correction for Earth’s rotation,
BL86’s radar echo will appear as slowly-drifting and within 15 kHz of 2380 MHz.
Predicted echo frequency as a function of time for a given location can be
obtained on-request by emailing Michael Busch (mbusch@seti.org).  We expect an
echo bandwidth of 6 Hz or less.

Details of the BL86 radar observing campaign at the Arecibo Observatory, NASA’s
Goldstone Solar System Radar facility, and the National Radio Astronomy
Observatory are available at:
http://echo.jpl.nasa.gov/asteroids/2004BL86/2004BL86_planning.html.

[ANS thanks JPL for the above information]

———————————————————————

SKN on OSCAR Best Fist Nominations Due

Thanks to all who participated in AMSAT’s Straight Key Night on OSCAR 2015.  If
you haven’t already done so, please take a moment to nominate someone you worked
for Best Fist.  Your nominee need not have had the best fist of those you heard,
only of those you worked.

Send your nomination to w2rs@amsat.org

[ANS thanks Ray, W2RS, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Upcoming ARISS Contact

An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants
at Masakame” event, Shibuya, Japan on 24 Jan. The event is scheduled to begin at
approximately 14:21 UTC. The duration of the contact is approximately 9 minutes
and 30 seconds. The contact will be direct between NA1SS and JK1ZRW. The contact
should be audible over Japan and adjacent areas. Interested parties are invited
to listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted
in English.

Japan Broadcasting Corp. (NHK) are televising a regular science program Masakame
(means Good Heavens) for young people and their parents.

Aa special program focusing ARISS program and Amateur radio satellites, etc. on
2015-02-28 on air, with video record of ARISS school contact. Members of
contact are TV talent (who has a amateur radio license) and high school
students (age 15 to 18).

[ANS thanks David, AA4KN, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Containerized Satellite Survey

Bungo Shiotani is a Ph.D. student working with Dr. Norman Fitz-Coy at the
University of Florida. He is requesting your assistance with this survey to
assess the potential impact that containerized satellite have on the debris
population in low Earth orbit. The results will be used as part of his Ph.D.
dissertation to create a statistical database and to quantify the growth of
debris population. The hope is the outcome will increase the awareness to the
community regarding the potential growth of debris population due to
containerized satellites.

Your identify will not be collected unless you choose to disclose it in the
survey. Additionally, if you would like the results sent directly to you, please
disclose your contact information when requested in the survey.

Please respond to this survey by Friday, February 27th 2015. The survey should
take less than 30 minutes to complete.

Survey link: https://ufl.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_8CYyyDTFUGKHFbL

Please forward this information to other members of the space community.

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to contact:

Bungo Shiotani
Graduate Researcher
bshiota@ufl.edu

Dr. Norman Fitz-Coy
Research Advisor
nfc@ufl.edu

[ANS thanks Bungo Shiotani for the above information]

———————————————————————

Search for NASA Educational Resources With New Search Tool

Are you looking for a lesson plan about the planet Jupiter? Do you need a
poster with information about the Wright Brothers’ first flight? Or maybe
you’re hunting for a website with information about NASA’s deep space
missions. NASA Education has a new tool to help you in your search!

NASA’s new Educational Resource Search Tool can help you find lesson plans,
posters, educator guides and other materials to supplement your science,
technology, engineering and mathematics curriculum. Search hundreds of
resources by subject, grade level, type and keywords.

To check out the new search tool and begin your educational resource hunt,
visit http://www.nasa.gov/education/materials/

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Jan. 22, 2015 for the
above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-018

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Fox-1A Launch Date
* Most Current ISS Keps
* NASA Cubesat Simulators Intern Opportunities Summer 2015
* AESP-14 CubeSat on ISS awaiting deployment
* OGMS-SA CubeSat to provide FM Transponder
* Call for Speakers and Papers for the 41st Eastern VHF/UHF/Microwave
Conference
* Dick Flagg, AH6NM, honored as Yasme Excellence Award Winner
* Video of FUNcube-1 demonstration at IARU-R1 conference
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-018.01
ANS-018 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 018.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE January 18, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-018.01

—————————————————– —————-

Fox-1A Launch Date

AMSAT has received a launch date for the Fox-1A satellite. Fox-1A will
be launched on August 27, 2015 on a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5
rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California on the NROL-55 flight
for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The launch time has not
been announced.

Fox-1A Operating Frequencies include:

Uplink 435.180 MHz FM
Downlink 145.980 MHz FM

The AMSAT Fox series of satellites will include additional opportunities
for launch during 2015-2016:

+ Fox-1B will fly with the Vanderbilt University radiation
experiments expected in 2016.

+ Fox-1C* will launch on Spaceflight’s maiden mission of the
SHERPA multi-cubesat deployer during the 3rd quarter of 2015.

+ Fox-1D is a flight spare for Fox-1C. If not needed as a spare
it will become available to launch on any open launch slot which
becomes available and be submitted in a Cubesat Launch Initiative
(CSLI) proposal in 2015.

+ Fox-1E is built as a flight spare for Fox-1B but has been included
in a student science proposal as part of the November, 2014 CSLI
for an ELaNa flight slot. If selected the Fox-1B spare will fly as
Fox-1E.

* The flight for Fox-1C has been purchased by AMSAT. It is not funded by
the Cubesat Launch Initiative ELaNa program. Fund raising for the
$125,000 launch costs for Fox-1C are underway. We have commissioned a
unique challenge coin for donors who have contributed at the $100 level
or higher. This challenge coin is shaped as an isometric view of a Fox-1
CubeSat, complete with details such as the stowed UHF antenna, solar cells,
and camera lens viewport. Struck in 3mm thick brass, plated with antique
silver, and finished in bright enamel, the coin is scaled to be
approximately 1:4 scale, or 1 inch along each of the six sides. The reverse
has the AMSAT Fox logo.

You may donate at:

+ The AMSAT web site
http://www.amsat.org

+ AMSAT’s page on the FundRazr crowdsourcing web site
http://fnd.us/c/6pz92/sh/561Zd

+ Or Call Martha at the AMSAT Office (888) 322-6728

[ANS thanks the Fox-1 Team for the above information]

—————————————————- ——————

Most Current ISS Keps

AMSAT has been working on updating the keps for the ISS in a more
timely manner. Joe Fitzgerald has confirmed that the AMSAT keps
download site is now updated with the latest ISS data.

Here is his comment:

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ftp/keps/current/nasabare.txt
is updated daily at 11:18 UTC with TLE’s from Spaceflight.nasa.gov
http://tinyurl.com/ANS018-ISS-TRAJECTORY-DATA

According to Joe Fitzgerald, “This is a very significant improvement
and should be very helpful for this who need accurate keps for school
contacts and other ISS activities.”

The bulletins remain on a weekly schedule with data from spacetrack.org
The ARISS team suggests this information should be share accordingly.

[ANS Thanks Joe Fitzgerald, KM1P, and ARISS for the above
information.]

———————————————– ———————–

NASA Cubesat Simulators Intern Opportunities Summer 2015

CubeSat Simulator Intern Opportunities in Greenbelt, MD USA
The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is offering an internship
position for the Summer 2015 semester. Applications are being taken
on the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (OSSI) recruiting web site.

To search, go to:
https://intern.nasa.gov –> Student Opportunities –> Internships –>
and you are brought to a page with tabs. The opening tab HOME
describes the main ground rules and schedule. Click the SEARCH
OPPORTUNITIES tab and scroll to the very bottom. Enter Keyword in the
box: “cubesat” without the quotes, then click the Search and then you
will get a growing list of opportunities including the Cubesat
Simulator, Cubesat Groundstation, and PICetSat Module & PCB
Development. This brings the student to this page:

https://intern.nasa.gov/ossi/web/public/guest/searchOpps/

Again, the Internship Titles are:
o CubeSat Simulator Upgrade Plus
o CubeSat Ground Station Development
o PICetSat Module & PCB Development

The objective of this Opportunity is to allow a university level
student to rework, repair and improve a prototype “1-Unit” CubeSat
simulator/model on loan from AMSAT and then to share his or her
experiences as a result. The model used in this Opportunity is
similar to that described in The AMSAT Journal article “Education
With a Satellite Simulator: ETP CubeSat Simulator,” by Mr. Mark
Spencer, ARRL Education and Technology Program Coordinator, Part 1
in the the September/October 2009 issue and Part 2 in the November/
December 2009 issue.

Back copies are available at:
http://www.arrl.org/files/file/ETP/CubeSat/CubeSat-Pt1-SepOct09.pdfhttp://www.arrl.org/files/file/ETP/CubeSat/CubeSat-Pt2-NovDec09.pdf

A course of study in engineering is required. Electrical/Electronics
Engineering (EE) or Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) for
university students in their junior class or higher. Experience in
hardware is also required.

Open to U.S. citizens.

The immediate skills required of the intern are to be a well-rounded
individual, and to have an excellent knowledge of and experience with
Windows operating systems, Microsoft Office (especially in using
spreadsheets), electrical and electronic circuits (theory and
practice), microcontrollers, interfacing, and the use of basic
laboratory test equipment and procedures.

Familiarity with the CubeSat community is important.

A proficiency in either C++ or a similar language for microcontrollers
and the desire to learn a new one is necessary. A basic understanding
of data acquisition, signal processing, or control is required.

Hands-on experience in building something, repairing or upgrading
PCs or other electronic gear, or just getting stuff to work is required.
Mechanical and electrical construction skills will be used.

Experience in RF or wireless technology (anywhere between 3 and
2400 MHz) is very important. Holding or obtaining an Amateur Radio
license from the FCC and practical radio experience is a distinct
advantage.

A good attitude, an exceptional willingness to learn and to contribute
as a team player are essential qualities. Likewise, excellent
communicator skills (verbal, writing and definitely e-mail),
reliability, punctuality, having a self-starter work ethic and the
ability & desire to work independently for long periods are required.

You may ask questions regarding the tasks and skill requirements
with the mentor in advance (Mr. Pat Kilroy, Code 568,
Patrick.L.Kilroy@nasa.gov) and
telephone interviews will be available.

The student application instructions provide a deadline of March 1
to apply, but mentors will start evaluating applications as soon as
next week. The word to the wise is to get one’s application in ASAP
and certainly within the next three weeks!

Applications must be made via the OSSI web. Please Be sure to enclose
your callsign.

https://intern.nasa.gov/ossi/web/public/main/index.cfm?sola rAction=
view&subAction=content&contentCode=HOME_PAGE_INTERNSHIPS

[ANS thanks NASA and Pat, N8PK for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

OGMS-SA CubeSat to provide FM Transponder

The AESP-14 is a 1U CubeSat developed by undergraduate and graduate
engineering students at the Technology Institute of Aeronautics (ITA)
in Brazil. The satellite’s primary mission is to test the various
subsystems in the space environment.

The satellite was sent to the International Space Station (ISS) on
January 10 by the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch and it is now awaiting
release into space by the JEM orbital deployer (J-SSOD) at the Kibo
Japanese module.

The satellite has an amateur radio experiment developed by the
Americana Amateur Radio Club (CRAM). The experiment consists of the
random transmission of 100 sequences of ASCII characters prefixed
with the “CRAM” word that will used as part of a contest among
receiving stations. The first 10 amateur radio stations that complete
receiving the 100 sequences will be awarded a commemorative diploma.
A web site is being developed to collect the sequences. The site
address will be announced shortly.

AESP-14 will transmit with an RF power of 500 mW on 437.600 MHz using
the 9600 bps G3RUH modulation (GFSK) and AX.25 UI framing. Radio
amateurs are encouraged to send any telemetry frames received back to
the team. Telemetry format and more information will be published in
the project web site
http://www.aer.ita.br/~aesp14

An update bulletin will be released as soon as the final launch date
is announced by NASA.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK and Edson, PY2SDR for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

OGMS-SA CubeSat to provide FM Transponder

OGMS-SA is a 3U CubeSat being developed by students at the Paris-Est
Creteil University as part of the QB50 constellation.
The purposes of this CubeSat include upper atmosphere science; radio
communication experiments; technology demonstrator; education,
training and outreach.
Additionally it will provide an FM voice transponder for amateur use.
Planning is to use VHF uplink and UHF downlink with 9k6 FX25 GMSK
modulation. A downlink of 437.545 MHz has been coordinated.

OGMS-SA CubeSat
http://www.esep.pro/-CubeSat-OGMS-SA-En-construction-.html

Source IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination
http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru

QB50 CubeSat Launch Contract Signed
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/01/28/qb50-cubesat-launch-contract-signed /

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

Call for Speakers and Papers for the 41st Eastern VHF/UHF/Microwave
Conference

Talks and papers, both long and short, are needed for the 41st
Eastern VHF/UHF/Microwave Conference on April 17-19 2015 in
Manchester, CT.

Please tell us about what you have been working on: Operating,
contesting, construction, homebrewing, microwaves.

Please let Paul, W1GHZ, (w1ghz@arrl.net) know if you are considering
a presentation or paper. A commitment by the end of February would be
appreciated, with a deadline of 18 March.

The conference organizers are also planning another Friday afternoon
workshop. One suggestion is for an Antenna Modeling workshop. We
could even do two simultaneous workshops – one for Antenna Modeling
and something else for those who aren’t computer-oriented. Any
suggestions, please.

Find additional details at
http://www.newsvhf.com/vhfconf.html

[ANS thanks Paul, W1GHZ for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

Dick Flagg, AH6NM, honored as Yasme Excellence Award Winner

The Yasme Foundation Board of Directors has announced the recipients
of several awards. The Foundation named four individuals to receive
the Yasme Excellence Award for 2014.

Honored as Yasme Excellence Award winners were:

* Kimo Chun, KH7U, for 20 years of behind-the-scenes support to
DXpeditions to Pacific entities — including logistics, organization,
equipment, local contacts, and planning.

* Dick Flagg, AH6NM, for his years of working with the Amateur
Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program and its
predecessor Shuttle Amateur Radio EXperiment (SAREX), and for
supporting NASA’s Radio Jove project, both designed to introduce
Amateur Radio to students and the general public.

* Florin Cristian Predescu, YO9CNU, and Lisa Leenders, PA2LS, for
their work in organizing and promoting Youngsters on the Air (YOTA)
and Amateur Radio youth activities.

The Yasme Excellence Award is presented to individuals who, through
their own service, creativity, effort, and dedication, have made a
significant contribution to Amateur Radio in technical, operating, or
organizational achievement.

http://www.yasme.org/news_release/2014-01-07.pdf

[ANS thanks ARRL Letter and YASME Foundation for the above
information]

——————————————- ————————–

Video of FUNcube-1 demonstration at IARU-R1 conference

Riaan Greeff ZS4PR has released a video of the demonstration of the
FUNcube-1 (AO-73) CubeSat by Graham Shirville G3VZV to delegates at
the IARU Region 1 Conference in September 2014.

Mats SM6EAN has posted a brief report on the Swedish Amateur Radio
Society (SSA) website about the FUNcube-1 CubeSat presentation at the
IARU Region 1 General Conference in Varna-Albena, Bulgaria.

The following is translated from the original Swedish post.

After the session of the VHF, UHF and Microwave C5 Committee had
completed the delegates were given two interesting presentations.

Graham Shirville G3VZV did a poolside demonstration of the FUNcube-1
satellite which was launched in November 2013. Using a computer,
FUNcube SDR dongle and a turnstile antenna, held by Kjetil Toresen
LA8KV, he received FUNcube-1 and displayed the telemetry data on the
computer screen. The satellite’s telemetry beacon on 145.935 MHz was
also heard using a handheld SSB receiver.

A presentation was also made about Hamnet which is being expanded,
especially in Germany. Hamnet is a high-speed multimedia network and
it was discussed whether and how IARU Region 1 could support the
expansion of this network.

Post by Mats SM6EAN in Swedish
http://www.ssa.se/iaru-reg-1-dag-4/

FUNcube
http://FUNc ube.org.uk/

FUNcube SDR Dongle
http://FUNcubeDongle.com/

FUNcube Yahoo Group
http://amsat-uk.org/funcube/yahoo-group/

Dashboard App – Telemetry Decoder
http://funcube.org.uk/working-documents/funcube-telemetry-dashboa rd/

Data Warehouse – Telemetry Archive
http://warehouse.funcube.org.uk/

Hamnet
http://hamnetdb .net/

IARU Region 1 Conference documents and pictures
http://iarur1con2014.bfra.bg/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

* Friday and Saturday, 16-17 January 2015 – Cowtown Hamfest in Forest
Hill TX (south of Fort Worth)

* Saturday, 14 February 2015 – presentation for the Greater Los
Angeles Mensa Regional Gathering 2015 in Los Angeles CA (Concourse
Hotel at Los Angeles International Airport)

* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 February 2015 – Yuma Hamfest in Yuma AZ
(Yuma County Fairgrounds, 32nd Street between Pacific Avenue & Avenue
3E, south of I-8 exit 3)

* Saturday, 7 March 2015 – Irving Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Irving TX (west of Dallas)

* Friday and Saturday, 13-14 March 2015 – Green Country Hamfest in
Claremore OK (northeast of Tulsa)

* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 March 2015 – Acadiana Hamfest in Rayne
LA (west of Lafayette)

* Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Weatherford Hamfest in Weatherford TX
(west of Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex)

* Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Scottsdale AZ (northeast of Phoenix, near AZ-101/Princess Drive)

* Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ (22nd
Street, east of Columbus Blvd.)

* Friday, 3 April 2015 – presentation for the Associated Radio
Amateurs of Long Beach in Signal Hill CA (Signal Hill Community
Center)

* Saturday TBD in early May 2015 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association
Hamfest in Sierra Vista AZ

* Saturday TBD in early June 2015 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show
Low AZ

* Friday and Saturday, 12-13 June 2015 – HAM-COM in Irving TX (west
of Dallas)

* Friday and Saturday, 7-8 August 2015 – Austin Summerfest in Austin
TX

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

ARISS News

+ A direct contact with students at Richmond Heights Middle School
and at BioTECH @ Richmond Heights High School in Miami, Florida, USA
via W1HQL was successful Thu 2015-01-15 16:09:40 UTC 46 deg.
Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF answered 12 questions for an
audience of 400 students.

RICHMOND HEIGHTS MIDDLE SCHOOL

Richmond Heights Middle School opened its doors in 1963 in the
Richmond Heights community in southwest Miami, Florida. The now 50
year old school, is located in a historic African American Community.
An army captain by the name of Frank C. Martin believed it to be a
wise investment as well as the right thing to do to establish a
housing development in which Black veterans of WWII could purchase
their own home. There are currently 636 students and a teaching
staff of 41 faculty members. Along with its exemplary athletics
program, full time gifted program, and Cambridge program, Richmond
Heights Middle School offers a Zoology Magnet program to the students
of Miami Dade County Public Schools. This is an extremely unique
magnet program that is one of only three in the nation. The zoology
magnet is a result of a partnership with Zoo Miami, the Zoological
Society of Florida and Richmond Heights Middle School. It has been
in existence since 1988. Students have the unique opportunity to
visit the zoo to study the animals within their exhibits while
engaging in STEM fields of study.

BIOTECH @ RICHMOND HEIGHTS 9-12 HIGH SCHOOL

BioTECH @ Richmond Heights 9-12 High School is the only Conservation
Biology public magnet high school is the United States and boasts
three campuses: our educational center at Richmond Campus, our
Research Station at Zoo Miami, and our Botanical Outpost at Fairchild
Tropical Botanic Garden. BioTECH provides students with a
challenging and advanced level math and science curriculum focused on
Conservation Biology that exposes them to rigorous STEM coursework as
well as research opportunities with practicing scientists in state-of-
the-art laboratories. In classes taken on-site at Zoo Miami,
students study the human impact on biological diversity, making
BioTECH the only school in the country to offer a full research and
teaching facility within zoo grounds. Research experiences are
offered in collaboration with the local zoo and the local research
and botanic garden. BioTECH is currently home to 130 students that
travel within the boundaries of a 467 square mile area to attend
this unique school. The school opened its doors in August 2014 with
a total of 8 faculty members, 7 support staff members, and
an arsenal of practicing scientists and conservation educators from
Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Zoo Miami, Zoological Society of
Florida, Everglades National Park, The Dumond Conservancy, and
Biscayne National Park.

1. How would astronauts combat disease, say an accidental
infection by a Salmonella culture, given the increased virulence of
microbes in space?

2. What kind of work is the crew doing in support of the future
missions to Mars?

3. We have a 3D printer in our school. What are the future
implications of having a 3D printer on-board? What types of prints
will you create?

4. Does experiencing a sunrise/sunset every 90 minutes change
your sleep/wake cycles?

5. Do you feel physical exhaustion in space at the end of your
work day? How long is your work day?

6. Without gravity, how do plants, such as Arabidopsis, determine
orientation germination? Geotropism what do roots do? Do plants on
the ISS grow in all different directions?

7. Do you feel stressed on the space station? How do you cope
with stress on a space station and does it have more or less of an
effect on your immune system in space? Measure muscle conditioning?

8. How are astronaut diets altered to accommodate the changes to
the digestive system in microgravity?

9. All work and no play can be boring. What do you do for fun up
in space?

10. How do you keep from feeling trapped in the space station?

11. What role did your education play in becoming an astronaut?

12. Which teacher influenced you the most in your life and why?

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

+ A direct contact with high school students at Japanese Broadcasting
Corporation (NHK) headquarters in Shibuya, Japan in connection with
their “Masakame” event is scheduled for
Sat 2015-01-24 14:21:04 UTC 56 deg.

Japan’s NHK is televising a regular science program “Masakame” for
young people. (“Masakame” means Good Heavens.) They are planning to
offer a special program around the ARISS contact, which will be
video recorded, and Amateur Radio satellites on air on February 28.

The following contacts with RSØISS:

+ A direct contact with students in Kursk, Russia scheduled for
Wed 2014-12-24 has been postponed until January.
+ A direct contact with students in Kursk, Russia scheduled for
Thu 2014-12-25 has been postponed until January.

No additional information has been provided.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

——————————————- ————————–

Satellite Shorts From All Over

73 on 73 Award #7 – EA4AYW

Congratulations to Jorge Gallardo Sanchez, EA4AYW, for becoming the
seventh recipient of the 73 on 73 Award. He submitted a list of 73
stations worked via AO-73 between September 1, 2014 and
January 9, 2015.

For more information on the award see
http://amsat-uk.org/funcube/73-on-73-award/

[ANS thanks Paul, N8HM for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-011

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Dayton to Host 2015 AMSAT Space Symposium Oct 16-18
* Space Station Crew Available for Interviews Live from Orbiting
Laboratory
* NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships
* Dariusz Dabek, SP9TTX Earns 6th 73 on 73 Award
* Next US ARISS Contact Proposal Window opens February 15
* FUNcube-2 on UKube-1 – Jan 2015 update
* SHIN-EN2 Designated as Fuji Oscar 82
* FOX Challenge Coins Still Available
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over
SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-011.01
ANS-011 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 011.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE January 11, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-011.01
Dayton to Host 2015 AMSAT Space Symposium Oct 16-18

Mark Your Calendars !!

AMSAT NA announces that the 2015 AMSAT Space Symposium will be held
on Friday through Sunday, Oct 16, 17, 18, 2015 in Dayton, Ohio.

Location will be at the Crowne Plaza , 33 East 5th Street, in
Downtown, Dayton.
The Crown Plaza is a 3.5 star Hotel which has been recently renovated.

Some of the perks include
+ Free parking for attendees (with validation from the hotel).
+ Free transportation to and from the airport and within 5 miles of
hotel for side trips.
+ Several restaurants are in close proximity and within walking
distance.
+ Several alternate activities and attractions are in the Dayton area.
Air Force Museum
Mendelsons
R&L,
Historical Carillon Park
America’s Packard Museum
Local PBS Station, Think TV
+ If you are staying longer in the Dayton area, there are several
other points of interest close by.

2015 AMSAT Space Symposium and Annual Meeting

The annual AMSAT Space Symposium features:

+ Space Symposium with Amateur Satellite Presentations
+ Operating Techniques, News, & Plans from the Amateur Satellite
World
+ Board of Directors Meeting open to AMSAT members
+ Opportunities to Meet Board Members and Officers
+ AMSAT-NA Annual General Membership Meeting
+ Annual Banquet, Keynote Speaker and Door Prizes !!

Several members from The Dayton Amateur Radio Assn as well as many
other local clubs will be participating in helping with this event.

Additional information about the 2015 AMSAT Symposium will be posted
on the AMSAT web site, www.amsat.org, as it becomes available.

[ANS thanks Steve Coy K8UD and the AMSAT Office for the above
information]
———————————————————————
Space Station Crew Available for Interviews Live from Orbiting
Laboratory

Crew members of Expedition 42, currently aboard the International
Space Station, are available for live interviews with media and
social media during their mission aboard the orbital laboratory.

Space station commander Barry Wilmore and Flight Engineer Terry
Virts of NASA and European Space Agency Flight Engineer Samantha
Cristoforetti are on board the station along with their three Russian
crewmates, performing scientific research, demonstrating technology
and maintaining the complex.

Interviews will be offered in windows of 10 minutes. Interview
opportunities will be evaluated based on media audience size, and
relevance to current station activities and individual astronauts
aboard the space station. All three crewmembers may not be available
for every interview.

Interested media should contact Rob Navias at NASA’s Johnson Space
Center in Houston at rob.navias-1@nasa.gov and provide a two-hour
window of availability between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST, Monday through
Friday.

The crew also is available for interactive, social media events that
have the potential to reach significant audiences. All social media
platforms will be considered, but interviewers must meet the same
requirements as traditional media. No direct web connection to the
space station is available for conducting social media interviews.

To schedule a live social media interview, media should contact
Megan Sumner at megan.c.sumner@nasa.gov, and provide a two-hour
window of availability.

Actual dates and times for each interview will be provided to
approved media approximately two weeks before the interview date and
are subject to change or cancellation based on operational activity
aboard the station.

Television clients will use NASA Television Media Channel 103 to
conduct the interviews. Print, radio and internet media must conduct
the interviews using a land-line telephone connection and have an
additional telephone connection of any type for coordination. All
interviews will be broadcast live on NASA TV. Further technical
information will be provided to all media upon interview approval.

The International Space Station is a convergence of science,
technology and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies
and makes research breakthroughs not possible on Earth. The space
station has had continuous human occupation since November 2000. In
that time, it has received more than 200 visitors and a variety of
international and commercial spacecraft. The space station remains
the springboard to NASA’s next great leap in human space exploration.

Satellite tuning information is available at:

http://go.nasa.gov/1pOWUhR

For information about the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

Source NASA Media Advisory M15-005:

http://tinyurl.com/ANS011-ISSinterviews

[ANS thanks NASA for the above information]]
———————————————————————
NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and
graduate students for summer and fall 2015 internships. The History
Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research
questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all
levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and
publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a
large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior
knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a
keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are
needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential.
Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a
variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history
Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing
research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and
captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2015 internships are due Feb. 1, 2015. Fall
2015 internship applications are due June 1, 2015.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill
Barry at
bill dot barry at nasa.gov.

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message for Jan. 8, 2015 for the
above information]
———————————————————————
Dariusz Dabek, SP9TTX Earns 6th 73 on 73 Award

Congratulations to Dariusz Dabek, SP9TTX, for becoming the
sixth recipient of the 73 on 73 Award. He submitted a list of 78
stations worked via AO-73 between September 1, 2014 and January 3,
2015.

Reviewing the recent log submissions for the award, it appears that
the full time transponder activation over the holiday season
attracted several new users to the satellite.

Paul Stoetzer N8HM is sponsoring the award for contacts made via the
AO-73 (FUNcube-1) amateur radio satellite.

1. Work 73 unique stations on AO-73.
2. Contacts must be made on or after September 1, 2014.
3. There are no geographic restrictions on your operating location.

There will be no cost for this award (donations to AMSAT-UK and
AMSAT-NA’s Fox program are encouraged though).

No QSL cards are required. When you complete the requirements, email
your log extract including the callsign of each station worked, time
GMT, and date to n8hm@arrl.net as well as the address where you’d
like the award certificate sent.

For more information on the award see

http://amsat-uk.org/funcube/73-on-73-award/

[ANS thanks Paul Stoetzer N8HM for the above information]
———————————————————————
Next US ARISS Contact Proposal Window opens February 15

The next call for proposals for US entities to host an ARISS contact
is coming up in February, 2015.

Call for Proposals

Proposal Window February 15 – April 15, 2015
The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
Program is seeking formal and informal education institutions and
organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates
that the contact would be held between January 1, 2016 and June 30,
2016. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact
contact dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS
is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of
participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
education plan.
The deadline to submit a proposal is April 15, 2015.

The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will
participate in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts
are approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students and
educators to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-
answer session. An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication
opportunity via Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts
aboard the space station and classrooms and communities. ARISS
contacts afford education audiences the opportunity to learn
firsthand from astronauts what it is like to live and work in space
and to learn about space research conducted on the ISS. Students
also will have an opportunity to learn about satellite
communication, wireless technology, and radio science. Because of
the nature of human spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling
activities aboard the ISS, organizations must demonstrate
flexibility to accommodate changes in contact dates and times.
Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space
agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this
educational opportunity by providing the equipment and operational
support to enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and
students around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program
is managed by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and ARRL
(American Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA.

More Information

Interested parties can find more information about the program at
www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS. More details on expectations,
audience, proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times
of Information Sessions are available at

http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact

Please direct any questions to ariss@arrl.org.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]
———————————————————————
FUNcube-2 on UKube-1 – Jan 2015 update

Limited testing of the FUNcube-2 435/145 MHz linear transponder on
the UKube-1 spacecraft has been undertaken during the recent holiday
period.

This testing has shown that the transponder is able to work
effectively and that it is capable of a similar performance to the
transponder already operating on FUNcube-1.

AMSAT-UK and the FUNcube team have now submitted a detailed report
on the testing to the UK Space Agency, who are the owners and prime
operators of the UKube-1 spacecraft. It is expected that a meeting
will be held with them late January or early February to plan
possible future testing and operations.

Reception of UKube-1 FUNcube-2 Beacon

http://tinyurl.com/ANS011-FuncubeBeacon

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
SHIN-EN2 Designated as Fuji Oscar 82

William A. (Bill) Tynan, W3XO, OSCAR Number Administrator has
confered on SHIN-EN2 the designation Fuji OSCAR-82 or FO-82.

In reply to Seiji Fukushima’s, JH6RTO, request for an OSCAR number,
Bill said, “I along with all in AMSAT-NA and the world’s Amateur
Radio satellite community congratulate you and all involved with Fuji
OSCAR-82 and trust that it will fulfill all of its mission
objectives. FO-82 joins an illustrious line of Fuji spacecraft built
and launched by Japan.”

Shin-En2 is a 17 kg satellite measuring 490×490×475 mm built by
students at Kagoshima University in Japan which will carry a 145 to
435 MHz linear transponder into a deep space orbit.

The aims of the mission are:
• To establish communication technologies with a long range as far
as moon.
• To establish a new technology of the ultra-light-weight satellite.
Proposing a WSJT 29dBm UHF downlink and a 29dBm 20 kHz linear
transponder and a CW beacon all on UHF with a VHF uplink for the
transponder

The orbit will be quite different from the previous satellites. Shin-
En2 will have an elliptic orbit around the Sun and travel to a deep
space orbit between Venus and Mars. Its inclination will be almost
zero, which means Shin-En2 will stay in the Earth’s equatorial plane.

The distance from the Sun will be between 0.7 and 1.3 AU. An
Astronomical Unit (AU) is 149,597,871 km.

Shin-En2 IARU coordinated frequencies:
• 437.505 MHz CW beacon
• 437.385 MHz WSJT telemetry
• Inverting SSB/CW transponder
– 145.940-145.960 MHz uplink LSB
– 435.280-435.260 MHz downlink USB

Shin-En2 launched in the 4th quarter of 2014 with another amateur
radio satellite, ARTSAT2:DESPATCH, on a H-IIA rocket with the
asteroid explorer Hayabusa 2 as the main payload.

Kagoshima University satellite development team

http://tinyurl.com/Kagoshima-Satellite

Shin-En2 English Website

http://www.eee.kagoshima-u.ac.jp/~fuku-lab/sinen,english.html

ARTSAT2:DESPATCH – Art and Ham Radio in Deep Space

http://amsat-uk.org/2013/11/03/art-and-ham-radio-in-deep-space/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA and AMSAT-UK for the above Information]
———————————————————————
FOX Challenge Coins Still Available

It’s a new year, and hopefully we have all recovered from the
holidays. Here at AMSAT Fox fundraising HQ, we are busy packing up
the new batch of coins that came in over the holidays, to ship to our
generous donors. This year will see the launches of Fox-1A and -1C,
both carrying university experiments and VHF/UHF ham radio repeaters.
Help us keep ham radio in space with your donation and sharing our
FundRazr link via social media.

http://www.amsat.org/?p=3275

The Fox program is designed to provide a platform for university
experiments in space, as well as provide FM repeater capability for
radio amateurs worldwide. Fox-1A and 1C are set to launch in 2015,
and Fox-1B (also known as RadFXSat) is awaiting NASA ELANA launch
assignment. Further information on the Fox project can be found at

http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=1113.

[ANS thanks Drew KO4MA for the above Information]
———————————————————————
Successful ARISS Contacts with three Italian schools

Contacts with 3 Italian schools Friday January 9, 2015 were
successful. The events included students at Scuola Santa Teresa del
Bambin Gesù, Roma, Italy, direct via IKØUSO, students at Istituto
Salesiano Villa Sora, Frascati, Italy, direct via IWØCZC, and
students at Scuola Pontificia Pio IX, Roma, Italy, via telebridge
with IK1SLD. The contact was with Samantha Cristoforetti using the
callsign IRØISS the contact began 10:14:09 UTC, which is 11:14:09
CEWT.

The downlink was audible in Europe on 145.800MHz FM.

Images of event taken at Scuola Pontificia Pio IX, Roma:

https://www.flickr.com/gp/82104276@N02/xvhd78/

Audio of both contacts established per direct/telebridge today:

Schools represented:

Scuola Santa Teresa del Bambino Gesù
The school “Santa Teresa del Bambino Gesù” is a catholic primary
school in Rome, established to answer to the needs and demands for
Catholic education by the local population. The school belongs to the
Congregation of Missionary Carmelitane Sisters of Saint Therese of
Jesus Child. The school is open to families that take care of the
religious education and formation of their children. Preparation for
the ISS radio contact has been underway for a long time, including
educational projects on different scientific topics to support the
special event.

Istituto Salesiano Villa Sora
Villa Sora is located on the side of the ancient Roman boulevard
(now Via Tuscolana) in an area known as Tusculanus ager, which is
full of sumptuous villas, including those of Cicero, Lucullus and
Sulpicius Galba. This villa was built as a country house in the same
grounds of Lucullus` villa in the mid-16th century and it was
originally known as ‘Torricella’. The earliest documentation of its
history dates back to 1546, when the Chapel of Sancta Sanctorum of
Rome owned the villa. The land currently measures over 6 acres and
includes, in addition to the house and the school, a large park with
several building lots.

The school of Villa Sora has a notable historical tradition. Since
1925, it has a primary school and a liceo classico. The liceo
scientifico was founded in 1966 and in 1986 its admission was opened
to girls. In 1989, the middle school was created, and finally, in
2011, a new liceo economico sociale was founded. The middle school
now has 200 students divided in three classes. The liceo classico has
180 students, the liceo scientifico 280 and the liceo economico
sociale 80, for a total of 740 students.

The space conversation was conducted in Italian. The following 20
questions were answered by Samantha Cristoforetti as well as
greetings and wishes before LOS. This was amazing as Samantha
responded very exhaustively and with many details.

Translation:

1. The time of the re-entry into the atmosphere seems to be less
evolved. There are studies underway to modify or change this stage?
2. How long does it take to arrive on the international space station?
3. What is the equipment of the astronaut during extra vehicular
activity?
4. What kind of material is made the surface that covers the lower
part of the spacecraft re-entry?
5. How many km / h you travel to reach the international space
station?
6. The extra vehicular activities that you will do will umbilical or
free? What goals and how they will be held?
7. How does the deceleration during re-entry?
8. The control of the flight on the Soyuz is automatic or are you a
pilot?
9. How does the return to the international space station after an
extra vehicular activity?
10. After take-off part of the missile is dispersed in space?
11. Which angle is formed between the trajectory of the spacecraft
and the Earth’s surface during re-entry? What are the risks an
angle of re-entry is not correct?
12. Samantha, you are the first Italian woman to do extra vehicular
activity. What are your feelings and what your concerns about it?
13. What happens to take off when passing through the Earth’s
atmosphere?
14. During the return to earth, how much gravitational force suffer
the astronauts?
15. There is the possibility of accidents during extra vehicular
activity?
16. When it takes off there is a lot of turbulence?
17. Why do astronauts after the mission should go in quarantine?
What happens at the neurological level?
18. How do you prepare for extra vehicular activity? What is the
training and simulations?
19. It was more exciting to enter into the international space
station or the time of takeoff?
20. How do you manage to fit into a specific point on the earth,
without risk to human life and the environment?

ARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering
the participating space agencies, NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA,
CNES, JAXA, and CSA, with the AMSAT and IARU organizations from
participating countries.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the
excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers
onboard the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and
communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS
can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology and learning.

[ANS thanks Gaston ON4WF and Francesco IK0WGF, ARISS for the above
information]

ARISS News

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Richmond Heights Middle School, Miami, FL, anticipates a direct
contact via W1HQL, scheduled for Thursday 2015-01-15 16:09:40 UTC.
Because this is a reschedule due to the delay of the SpaceX resupply
mission timing depends on the the school confirming availability. As
of press time, ARISS was still awaiting word of the confirmation. The
downlink should be audible across the SE USA. The contact will be
held in English and is scheduled to be with Samantha Cristoforetti
IZØUDF using the callsign NA1SS.

RICHMOND HEIGHTS MIDDLE SCHOOL
Richmond Heights Middle School opened its doors in 1963 in the
Richmond Heights community in southwest Miami, Florida. The now 50
year old school, is located in a historic African American Community.
An army captain by the name of Frank C. Martin believed it to be a
wise investment as well as the right thing to do to establish a
housing development in which Black veterans of WWII could purchase
their own home. There are currently 636 students and a teaching
staff of 41 faculty members. Along with its exemplary athletics
program, full time gifted program, and Cambridge program, Richmond
Heights Middle School offers a Zoology Magnet program to the students
of Miami Dade County Public Schools. This is an extremely unique
magnet program that is one of only three in the nation. The zoology
magnet is a result of a partnership with Zoo Miami, the Zoological
Society of Florida and Richmond Heights Middle School. It has been
in existence since 1988. Students have the unique opportunity to
visit the zoo to study the animals within their exhibits while
engaging in STEM fields of study.

BIOTECH @ RICHMOND HEIGHTS 9-12 HIGH SCHOOL
BioTECH @ Richmond Heights 9-12 High School is the only Conservation
Biology public magnet high school is the United States and boasts
three campuses: our educational center at Richmond Campus, our
Research Station at Zoo Miami, and our Botanical Outpost at Fairchild
Tropical Botanic Garden. BioTECH provides students with a
challenging and advanced level math and science curriculum focused on
Conservation Biology that exposes them to rigorous STEM coursework as
well as research opportunities with practicing scientists in state-of-
the-art laboratories. In classes taken on-site at Zoo Miami,
students study the human impact on biological diversity, making
BioTECH the only school in the country to offer a full research and
teaching facility within zoo grounds. Research experiences are
offered in collaboration with the local zoo and the local research
and botanic garden. BioTECH is currently home to 130 students that
travel within the boundaries of a 467 square mile area to attend this
unique school. The school opened its doors in August 2014 with a
total of 8 faculty members, 7 support staff members, and an arsenal
of practicing scientists and conservation educators from Fairchild
Tropical Botanic Garden, Zoo Miami, Zoological Society of Florida,
Everglades National Park, The Dumond Conservancy, and Biscayne
National Park.

The following is the list of the anticipated questions:

1. How would astronauts combat disease, say an accidental infection
by a Salmonella culture, given the increased virulence of
microbes in space?
2. What kind of work is the crew doing in support of the future
missions to Mars?
3. We have a 3D printer in our school. What are the future
implications of having a 3D printer on-board? What types of
prints will you create?
4. Does experiencing a sunrise/sunset every 90 minutes change your
sleep/wake cycles?
5. Do you feel physical exhaustion in space at the end of your work
day? How long is your work day?
6. Without gravity, how do plants, such as Arabidopsis, determine
orientation germination? Geotropism what do roots do? Do plants
on the ISS grow in all different directions?
7. Do you feel stressed on the space station? How do you cope with
stress on a space station and does it have more or less of an
effect on your immune system in space? Measure muscle
conditioning?
8. How are astronaut diets altered to accommodate the changes to
the digestive system in microgravity?
9. All work and no play can be boring. What do you do for fun up
in space?
10. How do you keep from feeling trapped in the space station?
11. What role did your education play in becoming an astronaut?
12. Which teacher influenced you the most in your life and why?

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]
———————————————————————
Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ CQ To Combine Jan/Feb 2015 Issues

(Hicksville, NY, January 9, 2015) — CQ magazine today announced
that it will be publishing a combined January/February 2015 issue and
will be ceasing publication of its “CQ Plus” digital edition
supplement as of the March 2015 issue. Both moves are intended to
help restore the magazine’s normal schedule for its print edition and
to strengthen its foundations moving forward as it enters its eighth
decade of publication, said Publisher Dick Ross, K2MGA. “These
decisions were not made lightly,” he added, “but in recognition of
the realities of the publishing industry. It’s a tough time to be in
the magazine business, and we appreciate the patience and loyalty of
both our readers and our advertisers.”

CQ will continue to publish both print and digital editions, but the
digital edition will no longer contain the 50-60 additional pages
each month that constituted “CQ Plus.” Editor Rich Moseson, W2VU,
noted that he hopes to include some former CQ Plus content within the
pages of CQ, but says ham radio will remain the magazine’s primary
focus, as it has been for the past seven decades. CQ is marking its
70th anniversary of publication as of its January/February issue.

As a consequence of the changes, CQ Plus Editor Richard Fisher,
KI6SN, will be leaving the CQ staff after serving for many years as a
columnist for, and then as editor of, Popular Communications,
WorldRadio Online and CQ Plus. He was also CQ magazine’s Emergency
Communications Editor. “We will miss Richard’s many contributions to
CQ’s products,” noted Moseson, “and thank him for his many years of
service to our readers.”

Subscribers to both the print and digital editions of CQ will have
their subscriptions extended by one month due to the combined
January/February issue.

CQ <www.cq-amateur-radio.com> is the world’s leading independent
amateur radio magazine, serving the amateur radio community worldwide
since 1945. It is published in three languages (English, Spanish and
Portuguese) and in both print and digital formats.

[ANS thanks Rich Moseson, W2VU, CQ Magazine for the above information]
———————————————————————
/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-004

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* W5PFG/P Northern Maine Grid Expedition
* Opportunities to Help at AMSAT User Services
* Design The Next AMSAT Satellite!
* 73 on 73 Award #5 – EC4TR
* Geosynchronous Es’hail-2 with Amateur Payload Contracted for 2016 Launch
* DESPATCH FO-81 Concludes Operations

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-004.01
ANS-004 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 004.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
January 4, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-004.01

W5PFG/P Northern Maine Grid Expedition

Weather permitting, a grid expedition to northern Maine will begin Saturday,
January 10, 2015.  Planned grids will be: FN53-54, FN57, FN65-67. The plan is
to try to operate as many satellite passes and gridlines as possible in the same
fashion as AC0RA’s March 2014 trip.  The trip will end up in FN42 by Sunday,
January 11 evening.

Twitter via @w5pfg will be the primary form of communications with
follow-up afterwards with some pictures at www.w5pfg.us.

[ANS thanks Clayton, W5PFG, for the above  information]

———————————————————————

Opportunities to Help at AMSAT User Services

AMSAT’s User Services Department is recruiting for several volunteer
positions to augment our dedicated and elite staff! The User Services
Department provides support in several areas including:

+ AMSAT News Service
+ The AMSAT Journal magazine
+ AMSAT’s web presence at www.amsat.org

The AMSAT News Service
———————–
We need two or more volunteers to step forward who can dedicate time on a
rotating shift of news editors. The AMSAT News Service (ANS) sends out a
weekly news bulletin of everything of interest to amateur radio in space.
The entire ANS crew (currently 3 editors) helps round up the news and each
ANS editor takes a week as editor to compile the week’s ANS bulletins. We’ll
get you into the bulletin rotation and you’ll take your turn as the ANS
editor this week.

The AMSAT Journal Magazine
————————–
We need two or more volunteers who can help compile one of AMSAT’s key
membership benefits … The AMSAT Journal Magazine. An assistant editor is
needed to help our existing team of editors (currently 3) to locate articles
and establish contact with potential authors. All you need is an eye for
articles of interest to amateur radio in space. You’ll compile input from
AMSAT HQ, volunteer authors, and amateur radio news sources into articles
for publication in our bi-monthly magazine.

We also need one volunteer who is capable of assuming the position of
editor-in-chief of the AMSAT Journal. You’ll help develop article sources
and using AMSAT provided software and templates compile the 32-page magazine
for six issues per year. Our publishing system is the Adobe InDesign CS6
package. This can be learned quickly by any computer literate ham. InDesign
is MS-Word on steroids.

AMSAT’s Web Presence
——————–
Help is needed on the front to locate and publish up to date content for the
AMSAT web. We publish late breaking news of amateur radio in space. We also
publish reference information to help operate on the satellites …
software, radios, antennas, operating techniques. Web content containing
late-breaking operating news and reliable operator tips currently has
several gaps needing to be filled. Our WordPress environment makes the web
display easy but you’ll be spending your volunteer time on the content. This
is a job for 5 or more volunteers and needs to be filled immediately!

AMSAT also is looking for a webmaster who will assume responsibility for the
display of all content in a WordPress environment. The basic framework is in
place but can definitely stand to be fine tuned and made into a world class
display of amateur radio in space. For most hams on-line www.amsat.org is
our “front door” and we are looking for the most capable help on this
important user interface!

Our team is the “voice of AMSAT”. News, operator tips, and membership
benefits are important products for AMSAT User Services. For questions or to
volunteer please contact AMSAT’s Vice President of User Services, JoAnne
Maenpaa, K9JKM at k9jkm@amsat.org

[ANS thanks AMSAT Vice President of User Services, JoAnne Maenpaa, K9JKM for
the above information]

———————————————————————

Design The Next AMSAT Satellite!

At the 2014 AMSAT Space Symposium AMSAT Vice President – Engineering
Jerry Buxton announced the plan for the next generation of AMSAT
satellites. “The door is open for everyone, to submit their ideas.
AMSAT Engineering has a long term strategy and this is the first
step.”

The Engineering long term strategy includes the following goals:
– Advancement of amateur radio satellite technical and communications skills
– Enhance international goodwill
– Grow and sustain a skilled pool of amateur radio satellite engineers
– Establish and maintain partnerships with educational institutions
– Develop a means to use hardware common to all opportunities

With respect to the last goal Jerry said “Within the bounds of the
type of satellite it takes to achieve any of the various orbit
opportunities, let’s consider in those plans the possibility of
developing a platform that can suit any and all orbits. Perhaps a
modular CubeSat, using a common bus as we did in Fox-1, which gives
great flexibility in building and flying different sizes and
configurations of CubeSats with simple common-design hardware
changes.”

Submissions should be thorough and contain the following
information. The purpose of the proposal is not just in suggesting an
idea; being an all-volunteer team AMSAT needs your help in carrying
out the idea.

Design Implementation – CubeSat platform Estimated timeline Cost –
volunteer resources, commercial (COTS) units Launch – how does it get
to orbit Strategy – how it fits into AMSAT’s Engineering long term
strategy

As mentioned above the idea should be based on the CubeSat platform.
This is the standard through which we will look for launches in the
foreseeable future.

In considering your proposal, Jerry encourages you to contact him
for more details on the criteria. A guidebook to the criteria is now
available for download here. In particular, if you plan to include a
university as a partner to provide experiments or other support and
you are not representing that university, please contact Jerry for
assistance in working with our existing partners or establishing a
new partnership.

“Being amateur radio operators, it is easy for us to fall into a
particular trap because of our history of communicating with other
amateurs throughout the world” says Jerry. “Specifically, most people
who are not already involved in the world of satellite technology are
unaware of or simply overlook the provisions of the current ITAR and
soon to be EAR export rules particularly with regard to deemed
exports which requires governmental permission to discuss satellite
projects with foreign nationals.”

While all amateurs are invited to submit ideas, U.S. amateurs must
take particular care of they choose to become involved in a
collaboration which includes individuals from other countries. It is
permissible to receive ideas and proposals from outside the U.S., but
it is not permitted for U.S. Persons to export or share design ideas
with other countries unless they have taken the proper steps to
insure compliance with ITAR and deemed export rules.

Additionally, those wishing to work on proposals should use care in
presenting themselves in their contacts. While the goal is for AMSAT
to build and launch the satellite, it is not an AMSAT project until
it is accepted by the AMSAT Board of Directors. It is acceptable to
represent yourself as members of a project team that plans to submit
a proposal to AMSAT for a future satellite project, as the AMSAT name
is well known.

“It is not our intention that ideas be submitted to AMSAT-NA which
would be more appropriately handled by an AMSAT organization in a
country where AMSAT is established. AMSAT-NA is seeking ideas from
amateurs in North America and will certainly consider ideas from
amateurs in countries which do not have an established AMSAT
organization or relationships with an existing AMSAT organization.”

The deadline for submissions is May 30, 2015. After the submission
date the ideas will be screened for completeness and then reviewed by
a board consisting of the AMSAT Engineering Team, AMSAT Senior
Officer and Board of Directors representatives, and aerospace
industry members. The review board may modify or consolidate ideas
and will consider which meet the criteria to become a project based
on feasibility, cost, and the ability to bring value to the amateur
satellite community. The review process is expected to be completed
in September 2015.

For those ideas selected to become a project which satisfy the
requirements for an ELaNa launch, the idea authors will be asked to
work with the AMSAT Engineering Team on an ELaNa proposal.

The Engineering Team will then work on the details of execution for
the selected project(s) and present a proposal to the AMSAT Board of
Directors in October 2015 for final approval to begin work. Once
approved, any ELaNa proposals will be submitted in November 2015 and
the project(s) will move forward.

Now is the time for YOU to begin working on the next AMSAT satellite!

[ANS thanks Jerry, N0JY, for the above information

———————————————————————

73 on 73 Award #5 – EC4TR

Congratulations to Jose Luis Peña Sanchez, EC4TR, for becoming the
fifth recipient of the 73 on 73 Award. He submitted a list of 73
stations worked via AO-73 between September 1, 2014 and December 31,
2014.

For more information on the award see
http://amsat-uk.org/funcube/73-on-73-award/

[ANS thanks Paul, N8HM, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Geosynchronous Es’hail-2 with Amateur Payload Contracted for 2016 Launch

The new satellite will be positioned at 26° East. In September 2014, a contract
with MELCO was signed to build the satellite based on the DS-2000 bus. In
December 2014, a launch contract was signed with SpaceX to launch the satellite
on a Falcon-9 v1.1 booster in late 2016.

Es’hail 2 will also provide the first Amateur Radio geostationary communication
capability linking Brazil and India. It will carry two “Phase 4″ Amateur Radio
transponders. The payload will consist of a 250 kHz linear transponder intended
for conventional analogue operations in addition to another transponder which
will have an 8 MHz bandwidth. The latter transponder is intended for
experimental digital modulation schemes and DVB amateur television. The uplinks
will be in the 2.400-2.450 GHz and the downlinks in the 10.450-10.500 GHz
amateur satellite service allocations. Both transponders will have broad beam
antennas to provide full coverage over about third of the earth’s surface. The
Qatar Amateur Radio Society and Qatar Satellite Company are cooperating on the
amateur radio project. AMSAT-DL is providing technical support to the project.

[ANS thanks Gunter Krebs for the above information]

———————————————————————

DESPATCH FO-81 Concludes Operations

The following update was provided by Akihiro Kubota.

One month has past since Deep Space Sculpture “ARTSAT2:DESPATCH(FO-81)”
was put into an Earth-escape orbit as a piggyback payload of H-IIA F26
launched at December 3, 2014 from Tanegashima Space Center, JAXA. It is
estimated to have stopped sending radio waves since the battery of
DESPATCH already ran out (We predicted that the battery will work for 27
days according to the running time of the transmitter).

Today January 3, the main control station, Tama Art University Ground
Station, decided to conclude the operation of DESPATCH. Many people
supported and cooperated us throughout the design and development of
DESPATCH. In addition, many excellent many ham radio operator received
and reported super weak  radio waves of DESPATCH from deep space. To
have this opportunity, I would like once again to thank all of them very
much.

Reception reports of DESPATCH are summarized on the following page.

Reception Reports
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1WP-
FzXHe8axAzNy44SGbKpJqIRKWHAcIP9vXnaHMb6g/edit#gid=0

Finally, we had two reception reports at 4.7 million kilo-meters from
the Earth  (more than 12 times of the distance to the Moon). They were
far beyond what we expected. They are the the longest communication
distance in the world between two amateur radio stations.

Orbital elements of DESPATCH is as follows (J2000 heliocentric ecliptic
coordinates).

– Semi-major axis a : 1.003881127 [AU]
– Eccentricity e : 0.08741828512
– Inclination  i : 6.796995362 [deg]
– Argument of perihelion w : 96.90057903 [deg]
– Longitude of the ascending node W : 250.5520871 [deg]
– Mean anomaly at epoch  M : 101.6280436 [deg]
– Epoch  : 2457023.50000 [JD]
(Time of perihelion :  2456919.7870655278675 [JD])

cf. Orbital elements of EARTH :
http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/earthfact.html

Celestial sphere position and orbital trajectory of DESPATCH can be
checked anytime on the following web pages.

– Celestial Sphere
http://artsat.jp/project/despatch/celestial

– Orbital Position
http://artsat.jp/project/despatch/orbit

Transmission of the radio wave from DESPATCH has ended. However, the
life of DESPATCH as a sculpture around the sun is almost eternal.
We calculated the orbit (the distance from the Earth) of DESPATCH for
500 years from now.

http://artsat.jp/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/500years.png

http://artsat.jp/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/500years_large.png

DESPATCH will continue to orbit around the sun as an artificial
asteroid. By examining the calculated results for the local minimum
value of the distance between the Earth, DESPATCH will approaches to
less than 1 million km from Earth after about 350 years. Possibly it
will approach more closer to the Earth due to the interaction with
unpredictable other celestial bodies.

We are glad if you think of DESPATCH as the most distant artwork in the
world sometimes in the future.

ARTSAT project will continue to the future. We already started the
conceptual design of next ARTSAT3. We kindly ask for your continuous
support and cooperation for the project.

[ANS thanks Akihiro Kubota for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-362

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT Awards Update
* FUNcube-1 in full-time transponder mode
* NASA Cube Quest Challenge Summit Jan 7th & 8th
* AMSAT Events
* Russian ISS School Contacts
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-362.01
ANS-362 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 362.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE December 28, 2014
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-362.01

———————————————————————

AMSAT Awards Update

As 2014 draws to an end and we look at all the accomplishments hams
have made towards satellite operation and those that have entered the
satellite community I would like to thank all of those that have made
the year what it was. Those that took time off to travel and work
satellites from semi-rare and rare grid squares, those that operated
for the AO-7 special event, those that helped build, test and launch
satellites and especially those that nurture students in elementary
through college grades.

Here are our latest inductions into some of the AMSAT awards
community.

The following have entered into the Satellite Communicators Club for
making their first satellite QSO.

David Barholomew, AD7DB
John Bartholomew, N7JY
Walter Dilley, KD7DNY
Nicolas Romero, KG5BON

To see all the awards visit
http://www.amsat.org or
http://www.amsatnet.com/awards.html

Bruce Paige, KK5DO
AMSAT Director Contests and Awards
ARRL Awards Manager (WAS, 5BWAS, VUCC), VE
Houston AMSAT Net – Wed 0200z on Echolink – Conference *AMSAT*
Also streaming MP3 at
http://www.amsatnet.com

Podcast at
http://www.amsatnet.com/podcast.xml or iTunes

[ANS thanks the Bruce, KK5DO for the above information]

———————————————————————

FUNcube-1 in full-time transponder mode

On December 23 FUNcube-1 / AO-73 was switched into full-time
transponder mode with low-power beacon. It will remain in that mode
for the next 5-7 days.

Enjoy the transponder.

With best wishes for the Festive Season, and for 2015

FUNcube Team

[ANS thanks the FUNcube team and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

NASA Cube Quest Challenge Summit Jan 7th & 8th

The NASA Centennial Challenges Program and NASA Ames Research Center
are pleased to announce that the Cube Quest Challenge Summit will be
held January 7-8, 2015 at the NASA Ames Conference Center.

NASA Ames Conference Center
500 Severyns Road
Moffett Field, CA 94035
650.604.2082
http://naccenter.arc.nasa.gov/

This event will bring together NASA Centennial Challenges
administrators, invited NASA technical experts and presenters, and
the community of interested technical service providers and potential
competitor team members for the purposes of:

* To introduce the Cube Quest operating conditions, rules and
constraints
* To encourage potential competitors to self-organize into teams
* Foster dialog; raise understanding about this exciting competition
and opportunities
* Support the best possible competition

The event will be held:
January 7, 2015 from 1 p.m to 5 p.m (Registration Desk opens at 12:00
noon)
January 8, 2015 from 8 a.m to 12 p.m

See website for more information:
http://www.nasa.gov/cubequestsummit/#.VJ7twP8oMw

[ANS thanks NASA for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country.  Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

* Sunday, 4 January 2015 – Ham Radio University in Bethpage NY
(Briarcliffe College)

* Saturday, 10 January 2015 – Thunderbird Hamfest 2015 in Phoenix AZ
(43rd Avenue, between Greenway and Bell Roads)

* Friday and Saturday, 16-17 January 2015 – Cowtown Hamfest in Forest
Hill TX (south of Fort Worth)

* Saturday, 14 February 2015 – presentation for the Greater Los
Angeles Mensa Regional Gathering 2015 in Los Angeles CA (Concourse
Hotel at Los Angeles International Airport)

* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 February 2015 – Yuma Hamfest in Yuma AZ
(Yuma County Fairgrounds, 32nd Street between Pacific Avenue & Avenue
3E, south of I-8 exit 3)

* Saturday, 7 March 2015 – Irving Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Irving TX (west of Dallas)

* Friday and Saturday, 13-14 March 2015 – Green Country Hamfest in
Claremore OK (northeast of Tulsa)

* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 March 2015 – Acadiana Hamfest in Rayne
LA (west of Lafayette)

* Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Weatherford Hamfest in Weatherford TX
(west of Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex)

* Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Scottsdale AZ (northeast of Phoenix, near AZ-101/Princess Drive)

* Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ (22nd
Street, east of Columbus Blvd.)

* Friday, 3 April 2015 – presentation for the Associated Radio
Amateurs of Long Beach in Signal Hill CA (Signal Hill Community
Center)

* Saturday TBD in early May 2015 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association
Hamfest in Sierra Vista AZ

* Saturday TBD in early June 2015 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show
Low AZ

* Friday and Saturday, 12-13 June 2015 – HAM-COM in Irving TX (west
of Dallas)

* Friday and Saturday, 7-8 August 2015 – Austin Summerfest in Austin
TX

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

Russian ISS School Contacts

Both Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB and Michal Zawada SQ5KTM have released
videos of ISS school contacts by cosmonaut Yelena Serov operating
with the callsign RS0ISS which took place on Sunday, December 21,
2014.

The amateur radio station in the Russian Service Module was used and
the Kenwood D710 operated on 145.800 MHz FM. The power setting used
is not clear but may have been 25 watts. It is understood that ISS
school contacts had been planned for Sunday with students at both
Ekaterinburg and Chelyabinsk.

In his blog Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB said of the first Chelyabinsk
contact: Radio session of the crew of the International Space Station
with a children’s art school in Chelyabinsk. With great difficulty
they contacted.

Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB Blog
http://tinyurl.com/R4UAB-B

AMSAT-UK
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/12/21/russian-iss-school-contacts/

[ANS thanks ARISS and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between About Gagarin From Space,
Amateur Session of The Parties  Centre Extracurricular Activities
Chelyabinsk, Chelyabinsk, Russia, direct via  R8AM
Contact was with RSØISS
Contact was successful 2014-12-21  11:55 UTC
(see above article)

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Kursk, Russia,  direct via TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is  postponed until 2015 January TBD UTC

Kursk, Russia, direct via  TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is postponed until 2015 January TBD  UTC

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

*Small CubeSat Provides Big Space Experience

Any way you slice it, space exploration — done right — requires
an inordinate range of technical expertise. From designing the
spacecraft, the mission proposal and the circuit boards to testing
the flight software and putting together budgets, sending something,
anything, into the cosmos depends on good people who know their job.

“Although significantly smaller in size, CubeSats contain analogous
payloads and subsystems to larger satellites and require similar
technical knowledge and resources to traditional flight projects,”
said Shannon Statham, an engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory
in Pasadena, California. “The training and experience gained by
working on CubeSats are directly applicable to larger missions.”

Only three years after receiving her graduate degree in engineering,
and having logged time in JPL’s Environmental Test Lab, Statham was
chosen to become the project manager for NASA’s Radiometer
Atmospheric CubeSat Experiment (RACE) mission. The position quickly
provided the Georgia Institute of Technology grad all the hands-on
experience she could have hoped for — and more.

“The core team for RACE was comprised of 15 early career hires,”
said Statham. “We each had our designated role, but we all wore many
hats and contributed to all aspects of taking the mission from
proposal, to design, to testing, to launch delivery. With a very
ambitious project schedule and budget, it’s what we had to do to get
the job done.”

RACE was a CubeSat, a small satellite no bigger than a loaf of
bread, designed to test components of an Earth-observing radiometer
that would be used in future missions by larger, more expensive
satellites. RACE was designed to “hitch a ride” aboard a rocket that
was already tasked with lofting a spacecraft to the International
Space Station. Once at the station, RACE would be set free to orbit
Earth as its own satellite, measuring the liquid water path and water
vapor that is pertinent to the water cycle and Earth’s energy budget
from 240 miles up.

“That is one of the beauties of CubeSats,” said Statham. “They are
small and compact, so placing them in the available nooks and
crannies of a rocket already set to carry another payload into space
can be quite cost-effective.”

When compared to its larger satellite siblings, just about
everything about CubeSats is diminutive. Even transporting them is
low-key. While their bigger brethren usually require a specially-
equipped, air-cushioned tractor trailer or perhaps a military cargo
plane, RACE made its way from the lab into the world via an attache-
sized box that Statham herself placed in the overhead compartment
above her airliner seat.

The RACE team had hoped to show their instrument’s performance could
rival that of traditional big satellites, resulting in potential cost
savings down the line. On the evening of October 28, 2014, Statham
and several other RACE early career hires watched as an Antares
rocket carrying their satellite lifted off from the Wallops Flight
Facility in Virginia. Moments into the flight, one of the rocket’s
main engines failed, sending its space station-destined payload
(including RACE) to a fiery end.

“The launch failure was a disappointment, but I think all of us know
that’s a risk you take,” said Statham. “We saw all our hard work
effectively go up in flames. But I think everyone on the team is
taking this as a very positive experience in general, and we’re all
moving on to new and exciting endeavors at JPL.”

Statham is sticking with CubeSats for the time being. She is working
on a JPL concept to fly a space-based radar called “RaInCube.” Others
on her team have gone on to other CubeSat projects, while still
others are working on more traditional space missions or in one of
the research labs at JPL.

And what of RACE itself? At the time of this writing, the 13.4-inch-
long (34-centimeter) spacecraft has not been recovered. But the
technology that Statham and her colleagues pushed from concept, to
test bed, to launch pad, lives on. The lessons learned developing the
radiometer, the instrument that was the heart of the RACE mission,
are being applied to a new CubeSat proposal called Temporal
Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems – Demonstrator (TEMPEST-D).

The next JPL CubeSat is scheduled to fly on January 29 of next year.
Called GEO-CAPE ROIC In-Flight Performance Experiment (GRIFEX), the
CubeSat will hitch a ride aboard the Soil Moisture Active-Passive
(SMAP) launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. GRIFEX is a
flight test of advanced technology required for future Earth
observers measuring atmospheric composition from geostationary Earth
orbit.

JPL has other CubeSat projects in development as well, including
missions to the moon, Mars and near-Earth asteroids. JPL recently
selected proposals from 10 universities to analyze CubeSat concepts
that could enhance a proposed Europa Clipper mission. The concepts
will be incorporated into a JPL study on how small probes could be
carried as auxiliary payloads.

“These tiny spacecraft are great platforms for increasing the
technology readiness of new technologies to buy down risk for larger
missions in a relatively short time frame and minimal budget. They
can also provide resources to larger missions with minimal impacts to
cost and mass,” said Statham. “The future looks bright for CubeSats.”

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Small_CubeSat_Provides_Big_Space_
Experience_999.html

[ANS thanks Spacedaily.com for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-355

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Worked All USA Grids Via Satellite – #488 for Doug Papay, KD8CAO
* Opportunities to Help at AMSAT User Services
* 73 on 73 Award #4 – EA5TT
* Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF, Reflects on Her First ARISS Contact
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-355.01
ANS-355 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 355.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE December 21, 2014
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-355.01

Worked All USA Grids Via Satellite – #488 for Doug Papay, KD8CAO

Congratulations to Doug Papay, KD8CAO for working grid #488 of the
488 USA grids. Doug worked N2COP/p, in FM13, for his final grid. The
contact was via SO-50 and was logged on 15/Dec/2014 @ 1252Z.

For his efforts he has been granted GRID MASTER award # 2.

In a recent AMSAT-BB email exchange with Damon Runion WA4HFN, Doug
said of his accomplishment, “…it certainly would not have been
possible without the help of the many individuals that went to extra
effort to activate so many rare grids.  These include those who
recently helped put the last 30 or so girds in the log: my father
K8YSE, Tom KA6SIP, Denny WB8K, Bill N2COP, Ron N8RO, Craig KL4E, Ed
WA7ETH, Steven KF7SLV, Wyatt AC0RA, and Clayton W5PFG.  Special
recognition goes to my father K8YSE, Jim ND9M, Patrick WD9EWK, and
Ted AA5CK for having been major contributors over the years  to this
accomplishment.  I’m sure there are may more that I have not
mentioned, and so I’m thankful for every effort, every contact is
appreciated!

“I also want to thank Rick WA4NVM for the heads-up via text from my
father K8YSE about FM13 on Sunday morning–while I missed Bill N2COP
that day, this head’s-up gave the motivation to be at the radio on
Monday morning, and sure enough Bill was there and the contact was
logged.   Without these guys watching out for me I would have missed
the grid yet again.  (Thanks Rick!).”

The Star Comm Group sponsors the Grid Master Award. To qualify for
this award you must make a satellite contact with all 488 grids in
the U.S. and get confirmation. Send your information to Ricky, WA4NVM
or Damon, WA4HFN. All Star Comm Group awards are free, they only ask
that you make a donation to AMSAT NA.

Grid Master Award #1 was awarded to Doug’s father, John Papay, K8YSE.

More information on the Grid Master and other Star Comm Group awards
can be found at:

http://www.starcommgroup.org/

[ANS thanks the Star Comm Group  and Doug KD8CAO for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Opportunities to Help at AMSAT User Services

AMSAT’s User Services Department is recruiting for several volunteer
positions to augment our dedicated and elite staff! The User Services
Department provides support in several areas including:

+ AMSAT News Service
+ The AMSAT Journal magazine
+ AMSAT’s web presence at www.amsat.org

The AMSAT News Service
———————–
We need two or more volunteers to step forward who can dedicate time
on a rotating shift of news editors. The AMSAT News Service (ANS)
sends out a weekly news bulletin of everything of interest to amateur
radio in space.

The entire ANS crew (currently 3 editors) helps round up the news
and each ANS editor takes a week as editor to compile the week’s ANS
bulletins. We’ll get you into the bulletin rotation and you’ll take
your turn as the ANS editor this week.

The AMSAT Journal Magazine
————————–
We need two or more volunteers who can help compile one of AMSAT’s
key membership benefits … The AMSAT Journal Magazine. An assistant
editor is needed to help our existing team of editors (currently 3)
to locate articles and establish contact with potential authors. All
you need is an eye for articles of interest to amateur radio in
space. You’ll compile input from AMSAT HQ, volunteer authors, and
amateur radio news sources into articles for publication in our bi-
monthly magazine.

We also need one volunteer who is capable of assuming the position
of editor-in-chief of the AMSAT Journal. You’ll help develop article
sources and using AMSAT provided software and templates compile the
32-page magazine for six issues per year. Our publishing system is
the Adobe InDesign CS6 package. This can be learned quickly by any
computer literate ham. InDesign is MS-Word on steroids.

AMSAT’s Web Presence
——————–
Help is needed on the front to locate and publish up to date content
for the AMSAT web. We publish late breaking news of amateur radio in
space. We also publish reference information to help operate on the
satellites …
software, radios, antennas, operating techniques. Web content
containing late-breaking operating news and reliable operator tips
currently has several gaps needing to be filled. Our WordPress
environment makes the web display easy but you’ll be spending your
volunteer time on the content. This is a job for 5 or more volunteers
and needs to be filled immediately!

AMSAT also is looking for a webmaster who will assume responsibility
for the display of all content in a WordPress environment. The basic
framework is in place but can definitely stand to be fine tuned and
made into a world class display of amateur radio in space. For most
hams on-line www.amsat.org is our “front door” and we are looking for
the most capable help on this important user interface!

Our team is the “voice of AMSAT”. News, operator tips, and
membership benefits are important products for AMSAT User Services.
For questions or to volunteer please contact AMSAT’s Vice President
of User Services, JoAnne Maenpaa, K9JKM at k9jkm@amsat.org

[ANS thanks AMSAT Vice President of User Services, JoAnne Maenpaa,
K9JKM for the above information]

———————————————————————

73 on 73 Award #4 – EA5TT

Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, who is sponsoring the award for contacts made
via the AO-73 (FUNcube-1) amateur radio satellite, recently
recognized Manuel D. Ruiz Carrasco, EA5TT, for becoming the fourth
recipient of the 73 on 73 Award. He submitted a list of 73 stations
worked via AO-73 between September 1, 2014 and December 8, 2014.

The award aims to promote activity on AO-73. The requirements are
straight-forward:

1. Work 73 unique stations on AO-73.
2. Contacts must be made on or after September 1, 2014.
3. There are no geographic restrictions on your operating location.

There will be no cost for this award (donations to AMSAT-UK and
AMSAT-NA’s Fox program are encouraged though).

No QSL cards are required. When you complete the requirements, email
your log extract including the callsign of each station worked, time
GMT, and date to n8hm@arrl.net as well as the address where you’d
like the award certificate sent.

Congratulations Manuel!

[ANS thanks Paul N8HM for the above information]]

———————————————————————

Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF, Reflects on Her First ARISS Contact

In her blog shared 16 Dec 2014, Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF,
reflects on her first ever ARISS school contact with twenty students
from Elena di Savoia in Bari and “Alessandro Volta” in Bitonto. In
her comments she thanks the “army of volunteers in many countires”
who make the contacts possible and how impressed she was with the
quality of all the questions that “showed a great interest and
knowledge in science and technology…”

“Yesterday I had my first HAM radio contact with school pupils. A
big hello to the students of the schools ‘Elena di Savoia’ in Bari
and ‘Alessandro Volta’ in Bitonto!  It was fun talking to you and
thanks for the great questions!

Amateur radio contacts between astronauts and school kids have a
long tradition on ISS, thanks to a little army of volunteers in many
countries who work with the local schools not only on the day of
contact, but also in the weeks and months leading up to the event:
they teach students about radio technology and about space, to get
them ready and hopefully excited about the event.

From my side, I only needed to be ready on the proper channel at the
proper time: it is very important, because we need direct line-of-
sight with the amateur radio station on the ground and the pass is
only about ten minutes long. A couple of minutes before the expected
acquisition-of-signal time, I started making calls to check if
someone was already picking me up. Eventually I picked up a call from
the ground station and sure enough, we started our conversation. I
heard them loud and clear, which positively surprised me: somehow I
expected signal quality not to be as good. I hope they had the same
quality on the other side.

On such contacts, there’s no time for small talk and formalities: in
less than ten minutes, we had to make sure that the 20 students who
were lined up to ask their question got their chance. So here I was,
ready to go. And here came the first question – are you ready? Here’s
it is:

‘It is known that people become taller when they are in space. What
happens to bio-molecules? Is there any alteration in the tertiary
structure of proteins?’

I almost fell off my chair… well, if I had had a chair. (Wonder what
a good equivalent of this expression would be in weightlessness… any
suggestions?)

Where are the good old question about space food and the space
toilet? Jokes apart, I was really impressed with all the questions:
they showed a great interest and knowledge in science and technology
and gave me great hope for our future generations of scientists and
engineers. Keep up the great work, girls and boys!”

Cristoforetti’s adventures in space can be followed at

https://plus.google.com/+SamanthaCristoforetti/posts

[ANS thanks Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between ELENA DI SAVOIA, BARI AND
ALESSANDRO VOLTA, BITONTO, Italy and Astronaut Samantha
Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF using callsign IR0ISS. The contact began
Monday 15 December 2014 at 1518 UTC and lasted about nine and a half
minutes. Contact was direct via IZ7EVR.
ARISS Mentor was IKØWGF.

The  Alessandro Volta school teaches communications, social-history,
mathematics, science and technology in different contexts: life,
study, job. In addition it fosters useful competence, allowing
students to access  continuous innovations through 3 specializations:
Mechanics and Mechatronics, IT and Telecommunications, Electronics
and Electro-technics.

ARISS mentor Francesco De Paolis, IK0WGF proposed to Radio Contact
Coordinator Mr. Michele Mallardi IZ7EVR to set up a direct contact,
with the support by IK1SLD back-up ground station, and this was
accepted. The event took place in Elena di Savoia school, where an
audience of more than 200 students, visitors (including some Italian
Air Force officers) and Media (2 TV, 2 newspapers) participated at
contact site, and about 200 at both schools. Total of more than 400
people.

Before the contact, Mrs. Rosa Tagliamonte by ASI (Italian Space
Agency) presented the Cristoforetti mission and the Italian
contribution to the International Space Station. Mr. Michele Mallardi
IZ7EVR presented ARISS and explained how a contact with the ISS is
performed via Ham Radio.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Yekaterinburg, Russia, direct via TBD
Contact is presently  scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is a go for Sun 2014-12-21 11:55 UTC  (primary) or Sun 2014-
12-21 13:00 UTC (backup)

Kursk, Russia,  direct via TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is  a go for Thu 2014-12-24 TBD UTC

Kursk, Russia, direct via  TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is a go for  Fri 2014-12-25 TBD  UTC

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Revised Tracking Utilites for DESAPTCH and Shin-en2

The spacecrafts, DESAPTCH and Shin-en2 are still alive.

Masahiro Sanada JI1IZR has recently revised the predict tracking
utilites for the extension of the data range.

The new versions can be obtained from:

http://ji1izr.air-nifty.com/ham_satellite/2014/12/artsat2-desp-11.html

[ANS thanks Masahiro,JI1IZR for the above information]

+ Radio ham helps ESA with tracking widget

Thanks to radio amateur Chip Sufitchi N2YO the European Space
Agency’s new satellite tracking widgets are live

The tracking widgets are fed with the latest orbital tracks for ESA
missions, or missions with significant ESA participation. The
default track shows the ISS.

Track ESA missions

http://blogs.esa.int/rocketscience/track-esa-missions/

ESA tracking widgets are powered by

http://www.n2yo.com/

[ANS thanks Southgate ARN for the above information]

+ In Liue of the recent SSTV transmissions from the International
Space Station, everyone is reminded that information is available by
visiting the ARISS SSTV Blogspot.

http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Also, the full set of archived SSTV images are located at:

http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Those that receive images can upload to the above link. The best of
the best uploads may make it to the blog.

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org
_______________________________________________
Sent via AMSAT-BB@amsat.org. AMSAT-NA makes this open forum available
to all interested persons worldwide without requiring membership. Opinions expressed
are solely those of the author, and do not reflect the official views of AMSAT-NA.
Not an AMSAT-NA member? Join now to support the amateur satellite program!
Subscription settings: http://amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb
AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-348

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* SSTV transmissions from the International Space Station
* Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule
* OSCAR Number for DESPATCH
* UWE-3 CubeSat Update
* Send your code into space with astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-348.01
ANS-348 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 348.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
December 14, 2014
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-348.01

SSTV transmissions from the International Space Station

The Russian ARISS team members plan to activate SSTV from the ISS on
Thursday December 18 and Saturday December 20, 2014.

Expected SSTV mode will be PD180 on 145.800 MHz with 3 minute off
periods between transmissions. A total of 12 different photos will be
sent during the operational period.

Start time would be around 14:20 UTC on December 18 and 12:40 UTC on
December 20. The transmissions should terminate around 21:30 UTC each
day.

For ongoing information visit the ARISS SSTV Blogspot
http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Also, the full set of archived SSTV images are located at:
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Those that receive images can upload to the above link. The best of
the best uploads may make it to the blog.

SpaceX CRS-55 will be launching this week and delays in the launch could
adjust SSTV operational times.

[ANS Thanks Gaston ON4WF, ARISS-Europe chairman, for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Istituto Tecnico Statale Economico e Tecnologico “Elena di Savoia” — ”
Piero Calamandrei”, Bari, Italy, direct via IZ7EVR and State Technical
Institute of Technology Alessandro Volta, Bitonto, Italy, direct via IZ7EVR
Contact is presently scheduled to be with IRØISS
Contact is a go for: Mon 2014-12-15 15:18:40 UTC 44 deg

Yekaterinburg, Russia, direct via TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is a go for Sun 2014-12-21 11:55 UTC (primary) or Sun 2014-12-21
13:00 UTC (backup)

Kursk, Russia, direct via TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is a go for Thu 2014-12-24 TBD UTC

Kursk, Russia, direct via TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is a go for Fri 2014-12-25 TBD UTC

ARISS is always glad to receive listener reports for the above contacts.
ARISS thanks everyone in advance for their assistance. Feel free to send
your reports to aj9n at amsat.org or aj9n at aol.com.

For US schools, just a reminder that proposals for hosting an ARISS
contact are due December 15, 2014.

[ANS thanks Charlie, AJ9N, for the above information]

———————————————————————

OSCAR Number for DESPATCH

Prof. Akihiro Kubota of the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan has informed
AMSAT-NA of the successful launch on December 3 of deep space probe DESPATCH.

One important mission for DESPATCH is an experiment in what is called
“cooperative diversity communication.” In this experiment, an attempt will be
made to collect signals from the spacecraft received not only at the ground
station in Tokyo, but also at many ham radio stations around the world. This is
in order to reconstruct the original data from the spacecraft.

Reception of such weak signals to reconstruct data from the spacecraft will
require the expertise of exceptionally skilled ham operators. The builders are
thereby providing a rare opportunity to receive radio signals transmitted by a
spacecraft in deep space, and ask for cooperation radio amateurs around the
world in the project.

Initially, it was expected that the spacecraft would last only a few days but
now it appears that this assessment was pessimistic with a longer life now
expected..

Since DESPATCH appears to have met all of the requirements for an OSCAR number,
including IARU coordination, I hereby with the authority vested in me be the
AMSAT-NA President, do confer on DESPATCH, the OSCAR number Fuji OSCAR 81 or
FO-81.

I use the Fuji designation in recognition of the long history of contributions
the Japanese have made to Amateur Radio satellites.

I trust that Fuji OSCAR-81’s mission will be successful and much valuable date
collected.

73,
William (Bill) Tynan, W3XO
OSCAR Number Administrator

Further information about the Cooperative Data Reconstruction project can be
found at the link below.

http://despatch.artsat.jp/en/Cooperative_Data_Reconstruction

[ANS thanks Bill, W3XO, for the above information]

———————————————————————

UWE-3 CubeSat Update

UWE-3 was launched with FUNcube-1 on November 21, 2013, the team says they will
now be temporarily ending operations.

Today, more than one year after launch, there will be a temporary end of
operations caused by the end of funding.

However, UWE-3 is in a very good health condition with fully charged batteries
and operations may be continued depending on future research plans.

Without any reception from ground, UWE-3 will carry out a warm reset every four
days and switch regularly between the redundant on-board processors and radios.
Therefore, UWE-3 will switch back to its nominal frequency of 437.385 MHz.

Nevertheless we appreciate the extensive support we received from the HAM
amateurs in the past and hope that also in the future the status of UWE-3 will
be monitored with your support, like you did so many times in the past year.
Thank you so much for the very helpful cooperation in this respect!

UEW-3 News
http://www7.informatik.uni-
wuerzburg.de/forschung/space_exploration/projects/uwe_3/uwe_3_news/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Send your code into space with astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI

Leading UK space organisations have joined forces with UK Astronaut Tim Peake
KG5BVI and Raspberry Pi to offer students a chance to devise and code their own
apps or experiment to run in space. Two Raspberry Pi computers are planned to be
flown to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of Tim’s 6 month mission
and both will be connected to a new “Astro Pi” board, loaded with a host of
sensors and gadgets.

Launched December 10 at an event held by the UK Space Agency, the Astro Pi
competition will be officially opened at the BETT conference (January 21-24) and
will be open to all primary and secondary school aged children who are resident
in the United Kingdom. The competition will be supported by a comprehensive
suite of teaching resources that are being developed by ESERO-UK and Raspberry
Pi.

During his mission to the ISS, Tim Peake KG5BVI plans to deploy the Astro Pi
computers in a number of different locations on board the ISS. He will then load
up the winning code whilst in orbit, set them running, collect the data
generated and then download this to Earth where it will be distributed to the
winning teams.

Speaking at the Astro Pi launch event, Dr David Parker, Chief Executive of the
UK Space Agency, also revealed that the UK Space Agency has been given a £2
million programme, as part of the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement, to support
further outreach activities around Tim’s mission, particularly to help inspire
interest in STEM subjects.

Tim Peake KG5BVI said I’m really excited about this project, born out of the
cooperation among UK industries and institutions. There is huge scope for fun
science and useful data gathering using the Astro Pi sensors on board the
International Space Station. This competition offers a unique chance for young
people to learn core computing skills that will be extremely useful in their
future. It’s going to be a lot of fun!

To help students on their way in developing their code, five inspirational
themes have been devised to stimulate creativity and scientific thinking. The
themes are Spacecraft Sensors, Satellite Imaging, Space Measurements, Data
Fusion and Space Radiation.

In the primary school age category, teams will be asked to devise and describe
an original idea for an experiment or application which can be conducted on the
Astro Pi by Tim during his mission. The two best submissions will get the
opportunity to work with the Astro Pi team to interpret their ideas and the team
at the Raspberry Pi Foundation will then code them ready for flight on the ISS.

In the secondary school age group, the competition will be run across three age
categories, one for each of Key Stages 3, 4 and 5 (in England and Wales, and
their equivalent ages in Scotland and Northern Ireland). In the first phase,
competitors can submit their ideas for experiments and applications. At least
the best 50 submissions in each age category will win a Raspberry Pi computer
and an Astro Pi board on which to code their idea. In phase 2, all teams will
develop code based on their original concept and two winning teams will be
selected in each age category. The winning teams’ code will be readied for
flight by the Raspberry Pi Foundation and CGI.

As well as having their code uploaded to the ISS, all winning teams will each
receive a class set of Raspberry Pi and Astro Pi boards, meet the Astro Pi team
and participate in a winners event during Tim’s flight.

In addition to the main prizes, each of the UK space companies supporting the
project have offered a prize. These prizes will be awarded to the best
submission associated with each of the themes, across the age ranges.

ESERO-UK and Raspberry Pi are developing a comprehensive suite of teaching
resources to link to the curriculum and assist teachers of STEM subjects in
engaging their students in the competition. As well as explaining how to use and
write code for the Astro Pi and its sensors, the resources will provide a
context for the Astro Pi in the curriculum and link to teaching subjects and
areas.

The first two resources of the series are available now in the National STEM
Centre eLibrary and the rest will follow.

Launching the Astro Pi computers, and consequently the successful implementation
and completion of this competition is subject to nominal progress through the
ESA integration programme and operations on-board the ISS.

BBC TV News: Astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI invites Raspberry Pi challenge
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-30415207

Astro Pi: Your code in space http://astro-pi.org/

[ANS thanks the UK Space Agency for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-341

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT Board Approves Technology Development Seed Funding
* November/December AMSAT Journal is Ready
* AMSAT SKN ON OSCAR 2015
* ARISS Discusses Ham TV, Elects New International Officers
* Amateur radio spacecraft received over 1 million km from Earth
* Japanese Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads are Launched
into Deep Space
* HAMSAT II – Dhruva Space and AMSAT India
* SpinSat Now in Orbit
* Surrey Space Centre SME-SAT
* AMSAT Events
* Call for Proposals ARISS Contact Opportunity
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-341.01
ANS-341 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 341.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE December 7, 2014
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-341.01
———————————————————————
AMSAT Board Approves Technology Development Seed Funding
The AMSAT Board of Directors met on December 2, 2014. As a part of
AMSAT’s “Design The Next AMSAT Satellite” challenge, the Board of
Directors approved $5000, within the 2015 engineering budget, to be
used as seed money for future satellite development. Additional fund
raising sources will also be investigated and pursued.

AMSAT President Barry Baines, WD4ASW, said, “We’re prepared to
return to space starting in 2015 with a fleet of satellites that will
equal, if not exceed, the performance, and availability to the
average ham, of our previously popular AMSAT OSCAR 51. Meanwhile, we
are preparing for the future looking to potentially leverage new
technologies, to provide the best opportunities for enhancing amateur
radio’s presence in space.”

Director Tom Clark, K3IO, noted the need for a defined future systems
program. Tom said, “We saw a significant number of both new and old
members who want to see the development of critical system elements
for future opportunities by 2018-20. As I see it, critical ‘tall
poles’ in applying potential technologies require significant work to
begin now to ensure success.”

AMSAT is interested in supporting technology ideas that enhance the
utility of using the CubeSat form factor to support more robust
amateur satellite capabilities. The scope of potential interest in
not limited; some examples of technology enhancement might include:

+ Microwave technology suitable for use in amateur spacecraft. This
includes the need to identify optimum frequency bands.

+ Complementary, low-cost ground systems, including an effective ~1º
antenna pointing system.

+ Define and develop optimum coding and modulation schemes for low
power microwave use.

+ Attitude determination & control systems to point the spacecraft
antennas towards the user while maximizing solar panel production.

Individuals interested in learning more about this initiative should
contact AMSAT Vice President-Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY (n0jy at
amsat.org).

Meanwhile, the development of AMSAT’s current series of the Fox-1
cubesats continues on schedule. AMSAT Vice-President of Engineering,
Jerry Buxton, N0JY reported during the Board meeting that
construction and testing of five Fox satellites is on schedule:

+ Fox-1A will launch on a NASA ELaNa flight during the 3rd quarter
of 2015 from Vandenberg AFB,

+ Fox-1B will fly with the Vanderbilt University radiation
experiments expected in 2016.

+ Fox-1C will launch on Spaceflight’s maiden mission of the
SHERPA multi-cubesat deployer during the 3rd quarter of 2015.
This flight was purchased by AMSAT.

+ Fox-1D is a flight spare for Fox-1C. If not needed as a spare
it will become available to launch on any open launch slot which
becomes available and be submitted in a CSLI proposal in 2015.

+ Fox-1E is built as a flight spare for Fox-1B but has been
included in a student science proposal as part of the November,
2014 Cubesat Launch Initiative (CSLI) for an ELaNa flight slot.
If selected the Fox-1B spare will fly as Fox-1E.

More details of the “Design The Next AMSAT Satellite” challenge can
be found on-line at:

http://www.amsat.org/?p=3395

– and – in the November/December 2014 AMSAT Journal, currently in-
transit to your QTH.
[ANS thanks the AMSAT Board Of Directors for the above information]
———————————————————————
November/December AMSAT Journal is Ready
The November/December 2014 AMSAT Journal is completed and has been
sent to the print shop.

The contents of this issue include:

+ AMSAT Announcements
+ Apogee View
+ November 15 – 40th Anniversary of AO-7 Launch
+ A Checklist to Design The Next AMSAT Satellite!
Jerry Buxton, N0JY
+ AMSAT Engineering Update
Jerry Buxton, N0JY
+ Satrack – Doppler and AZ/EL Control Software
Pedro Converso, LU7ABF
+ Operating FO-29 from CN73
Lee (Doc) Ernstrom, WA7HQD
+ Taking Part in the ARISS Project on a $500 Budget
Dr. Michael Butler, MA, MSc, PhD, G4OCR
+ How to Get Your AMSAT Challenge Coin
+ AMSAT Field Operations Report
Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK
+ ARISS 2014: A Program in Transition
Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, et al
+ An Eyeball QSO in India
Burns Fisher W2BFJ

Thanks to all who contributed!
[ANS thanks the AMSAT Journal for the above information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT SKN ON OSCAR 2015
You are cordially invited to participate in Straight Key Night on
OSCAR 2015, sponsored by AMSAT for radio amateurs throughout the
world.

This year’s event is being held in memory of Captain Charles Dorian,
W3JPT, who passed away in 2014, aged 92. Chuck, who had held many
senior positions in the U.S. Coast Guard, was one of AMSAT’s earliest
members and served as secretary of the Board of Directors.

Participation in AMSAT SKN on OSCAR is easy and fun. Just operate
CW, using a straight key or non-electronic “bug,” through any
amateur satellite between 0000 and 2400 UTC on January 1, 2015.
There is no need to send in a log, but all participants are asked to
nominate someone they worked for “Best Fist.” Your nominee need not
have the best fist of those you heard, only of those you worked.
Send your nomination to w2rs@amsat.org. A list of “Best Fist”
nominees will be published in early February.
[ANS thanks Ray, W2RS for the above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS Discusses Ham TV, Elects New International Officers
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is
continuing explore the possibility of establishing a network of
ground stations to enable the use of the Ham TV video system during
ARISS school contacts. Mark Steiner, K3MS, updated the ARISS
International team on the topic during its November meeting,
conducted by teleconference. Kerry Banke, N6IZW, who works on ARISS
hardware issues, reported that a document under development will
describe just what is required to build a ground station. He and
ARISS International Project Selection & Use Committee representative
Lou McFadin, W5DID, have successfully received Ham TV transmissions.

ARISS-EU President Gaston Bertels, ON4WF, has been working with
European Space Agency (ESA) management to finalize the agreement that
transfers custody of the Ham Video transmitter from ESA to ARISS.
Steiner told the teleconference that more “blank” test transmissions
could take place, once the custodial agreement is finalized.

NASA Astronaut Mike Hopkins, KF5LJG, successfully installed and
commissioned the ARISS) Ham Video system last March. The system can
transmit video of the crew and the interior of the Columbus module on
the 2.4 GHz band (S-band). Last April, Japanese Astronaut Koichi
Wakata, KC5ZTA, served as the host for a successful final
commissioning pass for the Ham Video transmitter and camera. The
ARISS project, led initially by ARISS-EU, AMSAT-Italy, and ESA, would
enhance ARISS school contacts by providing a video and audio
downlink, plus an audio-only uplink.

Operating under the call sign OR4ISS, the S-band transmitter can be
connected to one of two ARISS patch antennas on Columbus. Radiated RF
power is on the order of 10 W EIRP. The commissioning process
primarily involved making sure that ground stations in Europe would
be able to copy the DTV downlink signal. Commissioning of the overall
“Ham TV” system culminated more than a decade of planning and
preparation.

During the November 18 teleconference ARISS International delegates
re-elected the current slate of officers for new 2-year terms
starting on January 1, 2015. The incumbents are ARISS Chair Frank
Bauer, KA3HDO; ARISS Vice-Chair Oliver Amend, DG6BCE, and ARISS
Secretary-Treasurer Rosalie White, K1STO. In keeping with tradition,
Canada’s ARISS delegate Ian MacFarquhar, VE9IM, handled the election
logistics.
[ANS thanks ARISS, ARRL, & AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
Amateur radio spacecraft received over 1 million km from Earth
Michal Zawada SQ5KTM received signals from the ARTSAT2:DESPATCH and
Shin’en2 spacecraft on Friday evening, December 5 at a distance of
around 1,100,000 km from Earth.

Ham radio spacecraft launched into deep space

http://amsat-uk.org/2014/12/03/ham-radio-spacecraft-launched-into-

deep-space/
[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
Japanese Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads are Launched into
Deep Space
This week, Japan successfully launched its Hayabusa 2 asteroid
sample-return mission into deep space, and with it, two satellites
carrying Amateur Radio payloads. A Japan Aerospace Exploration
Agency (JAXA) rocket lifted off on schedule early on December 3
(UTC), carrying the Hayabusa 2 spacecraft on the first leg of its
journey to Asteroid 1999 JU3. Along for the ride into deep space are
two Amateur Radio satellites, Shin’en 2 (Abyss 2) and ARTSAT2:
DESPATCH. The launch had been postponed twice owing to unfavorable
weather conditions. Shin’en 2 will identify as JG6YIG, while
ARTSAT2:DESPATCH will use the call sign JQ1ZNN.

Shin’en2 carries a 0.1 W CW beacon on 437.505 MHz and telemetry on
437.385 MHz (0.8 W) using a mode similar to WSJT. It will also carry
a F1D digital store-and-forward transponder with an uplink of 145.942
MHz and a downlink at 435.270 MHz (0.4 W), but not the Amateur Radio
Mode J linear transponder announced earlier. The data format is
posted on the Kagoshima University website.

A linear SSB/CW transponder had been part of the initial design,
but, according to Hideo Kambayashi, JH3XCU, that had to be abandoned
because of regulatory issues. The digital transponder will offer
earthbound hams an opportunity to test the limits of their
communication capabilities, however. The project also is hoping to
gather listener reports.

ARTSAT2:DESPATCH carries a 7 W CW transmitter on 437.325 MHz.
Onboard will be the first sculpture ever to be carried into deep
space. The ARTSAT2: DESPATCH mission is seeking “exceptionally
skilled ham operators” as part of its “cooperative diversity
communication” experiment. This effort will attempt to intercept
signals from the spacecraft not only at the ground station in Tokyo,
but at Amateur Radio stations around the world, “in order to
reconstruct the original data from the spacecraft.”

“Reception of such weak signals to reconstruct data from the
spacecraft will require the expertise of exceptionally skilled ham
operators,” the satellite’s developers explained.

The two spacecraft will have an elliptical orbit around the Sun and
travel to a deep space orbit between Venus and Mars. With an orbital
inclination of nearly zero, the spacecraft should stay in Earth’s
equatorial plane. The distance from the Sun will be between
approximately 6.5 million and 12 million miles.
[ANS thanks ARRL and AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
HAMSAT II – Dhruva Space and AMSAT India
The Economic Times report Dhruva Space, a two-year-old start-up co-
founded by space technologist and ham radio operator Sanjay Nekkanti
VU3ISS/AB3OE, sealed a deal with AMSAT India on November 30, 2014 to
develop HAMSAT II. VUsat-OSCAR-52_HAMSAT

It will be the successor to HAMSAT VO-52 which went silent on July
11, 2014 due to the failure of the on-board lithium ion batteries.
HAMSAT provided a valuable communications resource for the amateur
radio community for over 9 years.

Dhruva’s satellites are expected to be launched on ISRO’s workhorse
Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV). Nekkanti said his team is
working closely with the space organization for design approvals and
testing of the satellite.

The AMSAT India Secretary Nitin Muttin, VU3TYG has released this
statement:

We are pleased to announce that AMSAT India and Dhruva Space Pvt.
Ltd. have signed a Memorandum of Understanding on November 30th 2014
to pursue the development of a follow up mission to HAMSAT launched
in 2005 on-board the PSLV-C6. HAMSAT II is envisioned to fill the gap
created by the recent end of life of HAMSAT and shall continue
servicing the societal needs in disaster management,
amateur/emergency radio communications and education.

Some of the contemplated payloads for HAMSAT II include:
* U/V Analog FM Transponder
* U/V Linear Transponder, 50 kHz
* APRS Digipeater
* Digitalker

Read The Economic Times article at

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/45354501.cms

AMSAT India

http://amsatindia.org/

[ANS thanks Dinesh, AB3DC and AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
SpinSat Now in Orbit
The US Naval Research Laboratory SpinSat satellite was successfully
deployed from the International Space Station on November 28. SpinSat
arrived at the ISS on September 21 via the SpaceX Falcon 9 resupply
vehicle. For the next few days, SpinSat’s orbit will approximate that
of the ISS. The ISS real-time tracker on the ISS Fan Club website can
show when the spacecraft are within range.

The 125-pound SpinSat, a 22- inch diameter sphere, carries a 2 W
9600 bps AX.25 packet radio store-and-forward system on 437.230 MHz.
The satellite’s primary mission is to demonstrate a new micro-
thruster technology, from which SpinSat derives its name; its 12
electronically controlled solid-propellant thrusters will be fired in
pairs to spin the spacecraft.

Equipped only with primary batteries and just 4.8 grams of fuel, the
satellite’s working phase is expected to last up to 6 months
[ANS thanks ARRL and AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
Surrey Space Centre SME-SAT
The Surrey Space Centre (SSC) are developing a 3U CubeSat SME-SAT
expected to launch into a 550-620 km orbit using the ISIPOD CubeSat
deployer.

The mission objectives are:
A: Outreach – The satellite will provide beacons for which amateur
satellite users and ham radio users will be able to receive.
B: Space qualification and performance characterisation of sensors.
* High performance COTS Gyroscopes (x3).
* High precision MEMS accelerometers.
* Aperture Star Camera, At a later point in the mission these will
be used in conjunction with the ADCS to characterise the closed loop
performance of the sensors.
C: Performance characterisation of Nano-Control Moment Gyros (CMGs)
for agility. The mission is equipped with 4-Nano-CMGs in a pyramid
configuration for ADCS. This part of the mission will evaluate the
performance of this system on the ADCS and agility of the satellite.
D: Space qualification and performance characterisation of the EPS
The EPS for this mission has heritage from the Delfi-C3 and other
missions and includes additional improvements to be demonstrated on
this mission.
E: Smart Thermal Radiation Devices (STRD tiles) SME-SAT is equipped
with a number of STRD tiles on the outside faces of the satellite for
passive thermal management of the internal structure.
F: Flux Gate Magnetometer The mission contains a scientific grade
miniaturized flux gate magnetometer that sits on the end of a
deployable boom to improve the performance of the sensor. This
payload will be switched into the ADCS for evaluation of performance
during parts of the mission but is not the primary magnetometer for
ADCS.
G: GPS SME-SAT also contains an experimental GPS system that will be
switched into the ADCS loop at stages in the orbit to evaluate the
performance of the system.

Planning a 9k6 RC-BPSK UHF downlink using AX25.

Further information at

http://www.surrey.ac.uk/ssc/research/space_vehicle_control/smesat/

index.htm

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination

http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT Events
Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

* Friday and Saturday, 11-12 December 2014 – Tampa Bay Hamfest in
Plant City FL (Agricultural Show Center)

* Sunday, 4 January 2015 – Ham Radio University in Bethpage NY
(Briarcliffe College)

* Saturday, 10 January 2015 – Thunderbird Hamfest 2015 in Phoenix AZ
(43rd Avenue, between Greenway and Bell Roads)

* Saturday, 14 February 2015 – Greater Los Angeles Mensa Regional
Gathering 2015 in Los Angeles CA (Concourse Hotel at Los Angeles
International Airport) – satellite- and AMSAT-related presentation

* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 February 2015 – Yuma Hamfest in Yuma AZ
(Yuma County Fairgrounds, 32nd Street between Pacific Avenue & Avenue
3E, south of I-8 exit 3)

* Saturday TBD in mid-March 2015 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club
Hamfest in Scottsdale AZ

* Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ (22nd
Street, east of Columbus Blvd.)

* Saturday TBD in early May 2015 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association
Hamfest in Sierra Vista AZ

* Saturday TBD in early June 2015 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show
Low AZ
[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]
———————————————————————
Call for Proposals ARISS Contact Opportunity
Proposal Window October 17 to December 15, 2014.

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program
is seeking formal and informal education institutions and
organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates
that the contact would be held between May 1, 2015 and December 31,
2015. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact contact
dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS is
looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of
participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
education plan.
The deadline to submit a proposal is December 15, 2014. Proposal
information and documents can be found at
www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.
The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate
in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are
approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students and educators
to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via
Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space
station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford
education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from
astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn
about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an
opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless
technology, and radio science. Because of the nature of human
spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the
ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate
changes in contact dates and times.
Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space
agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this educational
opportunity by providing the equipment and operational support to
enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and students
around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program is managed
by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and ARRL (American
Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA.
More Information

Interested parties can find more information about the program at
www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS.
For proposal information and more details such as expectations,
proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of
Information Sessions go to

http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please direct any questions to ariss@arrl.org.
[ANS thanks ARISS, AMSAT-Edu, and the ARRL for the above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS News
Upcoming Contacts

* From 2014-11-10 to 2014-12-07, there will be no US Operational
Segment (USOS) hams on board ISS. So any schools contacts during
this period will be conducted by the ARISS Russia team.
[ANS thanks ARISS, Gaston, ON4WF and Charlie, AJ9N for the above
information]
———————————————————————
Satellite Shorts From All Over
COSMOS-2491 RS-46

Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB reports that the COSMOS-2491 satellite carries
RS-46 operating on 435.465 MHz and 435.565 MHz (+/- Doppler).

The satellite was launched on December 25, 2013 and is in a 1,515.8
km by 1,489.1 km 82.5 degree inclination orbit.

Track COSMOS-2491 / RS-46 at

http://www.n2yo.com/satellite/?s=39497

Listen for RS-46 online with the SUWS WebSDR located near London

http://amsat-uk.org/2014/08/15/suws-websdr-moves-to-new-site/

COSMOS-2499 Callsign RS-47!

COSMOS-2499 (2014-028E) was launched on May 23, 2014 and is now in a
1,510.6 km by 1,158.8 km 82.4 degree orbit. Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB has
received signals from the satellite on approximately 435.465 MHz and
435.565 MHz (+/- Doppler). On November 30 the satellite started
identifying itself in Morse code on 435.465 MHz as RS-47.

There has been some mystery concerning the purpose of COSMOS-2499.
In a post updated November 20, 2014 Anatoly Zak @RussianSpaceWeb
wrote: Ground observations indicated that the mystery satellite had
not exceeded 0.3 meters in size. Previously, two Rockot launches
with trios of Rodnik/Strela-3M launches also carried Yubileiny
(a.k.a. MiR) experimental satellites with a reported mass from 48 to
100 kilograms. As with the previous launch, observers were at a
complete loss about the possible purpose of the satellite.

Cosmos-2499 has made a number or orbital changes since it was first
launched. For further information see

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/Cosmos-2499.html

Track COSMOS-2499 / RS-47 at

http://www.n2yo.com/?s=39765

Listen for RS-47 online with the SUWS WebSDR located near London

http://amsat-uk.org/2014/08/15/suws-websdr-moves-to-new-site/

RS-47 Telemetry data

http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?p=52752

Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB describes receiving the 435.465 MHz and 435.565
MHz signals at

http://tinyurl.com/R4UAB-COSMOS-2499

[ANS thanks Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB and AMSAT-UK for the above
information]
Job Opportunity: Quantum CubeSat Electronics and Software Engineer

The Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) at the National University
of Singapore (NUS) is looking for a talented and motivated engineer
with electronics and software expertise to join a young and dynamic
team developing science-grade cubesats to host state-of-the-art,
quantum communications experiments.
The successful candidate will be responsible for the electronics and
software of the satellite platform and will be engaged in the
complete cycle of satellite development from PDR, to operation of
satellites in space. They will work with the team to:

Specify and integrate spacecraft subsystems from our contracted
cubesat company.
Develop software to run the experiments and downlink the data
via an s-band network.
Perform extremely rigorous on-the-ground testing and
verification of the satellite and its payload.
Assist with electronics and software related issues with the
satellite and the payload as they arise.

They will need to be comfortable in a small-team academic
environment, flexible to changing priorities and requirements, and
they will need to develop a good understanding and appreciation of
the science payload and its working so as to best fulfill their
duties.

A proven track-record in developing successful, optimized,
electronics and software for control of experiments and
instrumentation in space or similar harsh environments is required.
Previous experience with the space industry, space hardware and/or
cubesats is very desirable but all cubesat-specific technical
training can be provided on-the-job by an internationally successful
cubesat company.

For an overview article on the project see:

http://www.quantumlah.org/media/story/2012_OPN_Alexfeature.pdf

Both Singaporeans and international applicants are encouraged to
apply. NUS is a globally ranked university and Singapore is a clean,
vibrant, multicultural English-speaking country with very high
standards of living. Salary is based on experience and skills but
will be internationally competitive.

Interested candidates should send a CV and cover letter to
cqtrb@nus.edu.sg and
cqtalej@nus.edu.sg

[ANS thanks CubeSat.org mailing list for the above information]
———————————————————————
/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

 

MHz while you’re away at work

http://antoninoporcino.xoom.it/VoxRecorder/

ARISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) Blog and Gallery
http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.co.uk/

Information on the MAI-75 SSTV experiment
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/education-26.html

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Send your message “from the Moon”

The LuxSpace 4M amateur radio payload is expected to fly around the
Moon at the end of October and you can upload a message to the 4M
website that will be transmitted on 145.980 MHz using JT65B during
the flight.

There is room for 2500 messages each up to 13 characters long. Your
message could be your name/callsign or “73 de M5AKA”.

During the lunar flyby, the spacecraft will be about 399,636 km from
Earth. The LuxSpace team wish to encourage radio amateurs around the
world to receive the transmissions and send in data. There will be a
number of Experiments and Contests with prizes to the winners in each
experiment and category. Details are given on page 19 of 4M Mission:
a Lunar FlyBy experiment.

4M stands for Manfred Memorial Moon Mission in memory of Professor
Manfred Fuchs, founder and chairman of OHB group, Bremen, who passed
away on April 27, 2014.

Register and Upload your message at
http://moon.luxspace.lu/messages/

4M Mission: a Lunar FlyBy experiment
https://ukamsat.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/lxs-4m-eme2014-a4-v3.pdf

Further information on this project is at
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/09/01/4m-lunar-payload/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Contract to Build Es’hailSat Includes AMSAT-DL Phase 4 Transponders

Gunter Krebs reports on his Space Pages on the web that Es’hailSat has
signed a contract with MELCO to build the Es’hail-2 geostationary
comsat.

Es’hail 2 is a planned communication satellite operated by
Es’hailSat, the Qatar Satellite Company. It will also feature an
radio amateur payload.

The new satellite will be positioned at the 26° East hotspot
position for TV broadcasting and significantly adds to the company’s
ability to provide high quality, premium DTH television content
across the Middle East and North Africa. It will feature Ku-band and
Ka-band transponders to provide TV distribution and government
services to strategic stakeholders and commercial customers who
value broadcasting and communications independence, interference
resilience, quality of service and wide geographical coverage.
Es’hail 2 is expected to be launched at the end of 2016.

In September 2014, a contract with MELCO was signed to build the
satellite based on the DS-2000 bus.

Es’hail 2 will also provide the first Amateur Radio geostationary
communication capability linking Brazil and India. It will carry two
“Phase 4″ Amateur Radio transponders. The payload will consist of a
250 kHz linear transponder intended for conventional analogue
operations in addition to another transponder which will have an
8 MHz bandwidth. The latter transponder is intended for experimental
digital modulation schemes and DVB amateur television. The uplinks
will be in the 2.400-2.450 GHz and the downlinks in the
10.450-10.500 GHz amateur satellite service allocations.
Both transponders will have broad beam antennas to provide full
coverage over about third of the earth’s surface. The Qatar Amateur
Radio Society andQatar Satellite Company are cooperating on the
amateur radio project.
AMSAT-DL is providing technical support to the project.

This story is posted at:
http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/eshail-2.htm

[ANS thanks Gunter’s Space Pages for the above information]

———————————————————————

Chicago Media Coverage St. Joan of Arc School ARISS Contact

Here is a link to local Chicagoland coverage of the St. Joan of Arc
ARISS contact:

http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2014/09/08/students-at-lisle-school-chat-
with-astronaut-aboard-international-space-station

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country.  Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

* Friday through Sunday, 12-14 September 2014 – ARRL Southwestern
Division Convention 2014 in San Diego CA (near Montgomery Field and I-
805/CA-163 interchange)
* Sunday, 25 October 2014 – Hamfest Chattanooga 2014 in Chattanooga
TN (Alhambra Center, near TN-320 and I-75 exit 3)
* Saturday, 8 November 2014 – Tucson Hamfest 2014 in Marana AZ
(along I-10 west frontage road, east of exit 236)
* Saturday, 6 December 2014 – Superstition Superfest 2014 in Mesa
AZ (Mesa Community College, Dobson Road between Southern Avenue & US-
60 exit 177)
* Saturday, 10 January 2015 – Thunderbird Hamfest in Phoenix AZ
(43rd Avenue, between Greenway and Bell Roads)
* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 February 2015 – Yuma Hamfest in Yuma
AZ (Yuma County Fairgrounds, 32nd Street between Pacific Avenue &
Avenue 3E, south of I-8 exit 3)

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Upcoming Contacts

* A direct contact via 4U1ITU with students at Institut Florimont,
Petit-Lancy, Switzerland is scheduled for Wed 2014-09-17
08:17:28 UTC 88 deg.

To celebrate ESA’s 50th anniversary, an audience comprised of
students from several countries will gather in the International
Conference Centre Geneva (CICG).

The nearby ITU (International Telecommunications Union) Headquarters
hosts the amateur radio station 4U1ITU. This ARISS contact will be
operated by the station’s trustee Attila Matas (HB9IAJ / OM1AM).

About 20 VIPs will be present in the 4U1ITU radio room (the “shack”
in Ham parlance). Via a video link, the audience in the CICG will
participate in the event.

Latest News

* September 9, 2014

A direct contact with students at Lanier Middle School and Lanier
Cluster Schools in Sugar Hill, GA, USA  via W4GR was successful at
11:16:25 UTC 83 deg.

Read and listen to a local media report about the contact:

http://www.gwinnettdailypost.com/news/2014/sep/09/radio-contact-
allows-lanier-students-to-talk-with/

Welcome to the Lanier Cluster, home of the Longhorns! We are a group
of schools with a common goal: Learn, Lead, Succeed. We are comprised
of one special needs preschool (The Buice School), three elementary
schools (Sugar Hill Elementary, Sycamore Elementary, White Oak
Elementary), one middle school (Lanier Middle), and one high school
(Lanier High). Our schools are located in the greater Atlanta metro
area in the largest school district in Georgia. Our schools and
cluster are named after nearby Lake Lanier, which part of the
Chattahoochee River system.

Our schools strive to create authentic learning environments for our
students. Towards that end, our elementary schools, Lanier Middle,
and Lanier High have project based learning programs for students. At
Lanier High, students choose to be a part of a school within a school
(academy model) as we guide students towards career and college
readiness. Lanier High was also recently certified as a Georgia STEM
high school, the only all-inclusive, traditional high school in
Georgia that has received this STEM certification.

Our students are excited about science and space exploration. They
have participated in regional and state science fairs, designed an
experiment flown in microgravity, and chatted with a NASA Earth
scientist live on NASA TV. They have presented at conferences,
participated in robotics and app challenge events, and even won an
Emmy for work on a 3D computer animation for a PBS documentary. The
students of Lanier Cluster are excited to be a part of this ARISS
contact!

September 8, 2014

A direct contact with students at St. Joan of Arc  School, Lisle,
IL, USA via K9LEZ  was successful  at 18:34:45 UTC 84 deg. Students
interviewed astronaut Alexander Gerst KF5ONO.

Listen to a local media report:
http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2014/09/08/students-at-lisle-school-chat-
with-astronaut-aboard-international-space-station/

St. Joan of Arc Catholic School is located in Lisle, Illinois, a
western suburb of Chicago. We are a pre-K to 8th grade school with
about 600 students. St. Joan provides an educational environment
which grants each student access to the highest quality and richest
variety of integrated educational experiences within our means. We
are committed to preparing our students to think critically and
become confident, sensitive, Christian leaders capable of adapting
and contributing to their community. Our school was awarded the
National Blue Ribbon Award for Academic Excellence in 2011. Our
school was named an IMSA (Illinios Math and Science Academy) Fusion
School in 2012. Our school participated in NASA’s microgravity
program through the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas in 2013.
The teachers directly involves in this contact completed the American
Radio Relay League’s (ARRL) summer teacher institute program and are
working with local radio amateurs to successfully complete this
contact and to provide additional opportunities to our classrooms.

September 5, 2014

A direct contact with students in St. Petersburg, Russia was
successful 2014-09-05 10:00 UTC.  No other details are available at
this time.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Keith, W5IU and Charlie, AJ9N for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

*Patrick Stoddard in October QST

See AMSAT’s own, Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK on page 79 of October’s
QST. The digital version is available online at
http://www.arrl.org

[ANS thanks the ARRL for the above information]

*Share your Experience

There are lots of hamfests that occur every month. Please try to get
out and share your experiences. I attended the SFTARC hamfest on
Saturday, September 13, 2014 in Gardner, KS. Randy, KD0HKD, gave a
presentation and made a few contacts including one lady’s first satellite
QSO. My point is that with the new Fox-1 series of satellites being
launched next year, the opportunity to welcome new members and
operators is increasing. Let’s begin attracting new membership by
being present.

[ANS thanks Joe, K6WAO for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org