AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletin

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-137

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Fox-1 Development, Launch, and Frequency Coordination Status at Dayton
* AMSAT FieldOps Team Fox-1 Operating Guide is Available
* US Naval Academy CubeSat Launch to Include Next APRS Satellite
* Iowa CubeSat students get ham radio licenses
* Extreme DX satellite contact between UK and Texas
* International Space Station Partners Adjust Spacecraft Schedule
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-137.01
ANS-137 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 137.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE May 17, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-137.01

———————————————————————

Fox-1 Development, Launch, and Frequency Coordination Status at Dayton
AMSAT Dayton Hamvention Annoucements (Saved)

During the AMSAT Forum at the Dayton Hamvention, AMSAT Vice President
Operations, Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA, and AMSAT Vice President – Engineering
Jerry Buxton, N0JY, provided more information about the Fox-1 satellites under
development. Buxton, N0JY, says Fox-1A has passed all environmental testing and
is integrated into the P-POD deployment canister. “The ‘remove before flight
pin’ has been pulled, the doors closed on the P-POD, and everything is aboard
the shipping container now en route to Vandenberg Air Force Base in California
for launch”, said Buxton.

Previously Buxton had announced plans to incorporate an L band receiver in Fox-
1C and Fox-1D. The addition will allow ground commanded selection of the U/v
(normal Fox-1 bands) or the new L/v 1.2 GHz (23 cm) mode. Both bands will
operate as FM single channel.
http://www.amsat.org/?p=4000

During the satellite operations segment of the AMSAT Forum Glasbrenner
provided the details of the uplink and downlink frequencies for the Fox-1 FM
cubesat fleet.

Fox-1 Frequencies

Uplink FM (67 Hz tone)             Downlink FM

Fox-1A             435.180 MHz                    145.980 MHz

RadFxSat/Fox-1B*   435.250 MHz                    145.960 MHz

Fox-1C*            435.300 MHz                    145.920 MHz
1267.300 MHz **                 145.920 MHz

Fox-1D*            435.350 MHz                    145.880 MHz
1267.350 MHz **                 145.880 MHz

* Pending IARU Coordination, If needed, changes will be announced
** U/v and L/v operations switchable by command station,
not operational simultaneously

According to Buxton, the team is planning to have an affordable L band uplink
ground station available to amateurs by the time Fox-1C is on orbit.

+ Fox-1A will launch on a NASA ELaNa flight scheduled during the
third quarter, 2015 from Vandenberg AFB. Fox-1A is a passenger
aboard this launch driven by the schedule of the primary payload.
When updates are available they will be announced via the ANS and
in the AMSAT Journal.

+ Fox-1B will fly with the Vanderbilt University radiation
experiments expected in 2016.

+ Fox-1C will launch on Spaceflight’s maiden mission of the SHERPA
multi-cubesat deployer on a SpaceX Falcon 9 flight planned for
late 2015.

+ Fox-1D is a flight spare for Fox-1C. If not needed as a spare
it will fly with the University of Iowa HERCI radiation mapping
experiment.

+ Fox-1E “Evolution” will carry a Mode J linear transponder. The
transponder is planned to be 30 kHz wide and will also have a
1200 bps BPSK telemetry beacon. Launch opportunities are being
developed, to be announced at a later date.

AMSAT has an immediate need to raise funds to cover both the launch contract
and additional materials for construction and testing for Fox-1C. Please help
us to continue to keep amateur radio in space. Donations may be made via the:

+ Paypal and credit card payment on the AMSAT website at
http://www.amsat.org

+ Donation link in the AMSAT store:
http://store.amsat.org/catalog/

+ Call the AMSAT office at (888) 322-6728

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Engineering and AMSAT Operations Teams for the above
information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT FieldOps Team Fox-1 Operating Guide is Available

AMSAT’s Director of Field Operations, Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK, invites you
to view and download the “Fox-1 Operating Guide” which was released at the
2015 Dayton Hamvention. This color PDF file is designed to print double-sided.
Two different resolution versions are available:

+ Low resolution PDF suitable for on-screen display (~400 KB size)

+ High resolution, press quality PDF for hard-copy printing (~2 MB size)

To access these files visit the AMSAT web and follow the path:

http://www.amsat.org –> Satellite Info –> Station and Operating Hints.

The direct link is
http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=2144
where you’ll find the link to the Guide.

[ANS thanks the AMSAT FieldOps Team for the above information]

———————————————————————

US Naval Academy CubeSat Launch to Include Next APRS Satellite

Sometime on or about May 20, the next US Naval Academy satellites and Brno
University PSK31 transponders head into space from Cape Canaveral on an Atlas 5
launcher and into an approximately 50° orbit. The launch will include the Psat
APRS satellite — a pair of identical 1.5 U cubesats (A and B) — as well as the
BRICsat and USS Langley (Unix Space Server Langley) nanosatellites.

“Psat is a Naval Academy student satellite project named in honor of one of
our graduates, Bradford Parkinson, of GPS fame, which contains an APRS
transponder for relaying remote telemetry, sensor, and user data from remote
users and Amateur Radio environmental experiments or other data sources back to
Amateur Radio experimenters via a global network of Internet-linked ground
stations,” explained APRS developer Bob Bruninga, WB4APR. In addition to the
data transponder, a secondary Brno University transponder will support multi-
user PSK31 text messaging. The APRS downlink will be 145.825 MHz (1200 baud
AX.25 APRS).

“We welcome radio amateurs worldwide to tune into the downlinks and either
IGate packets into the global APRS-IS system or to e-mail me,” Bruninga said.
“After launch, the next several orbits will be over USA and Europe.” Bruninga
said PSAT, including the PSK31 transponder, would not be available for use
until all on-orbit checks are complete, a process he said could take “many,
many days.” He also requested reports on any PSK31 (FM) heard on 435.350 MHz
(the PSK31 uplink is 28.120 MHz).

The PSK31 multi-user FDMA transponder experiment on Psat and BRICsat  is
similar to the one on RAFT and PCSAT2. It will allow messaging among up to 30
modest ground stations simultaneously, Bruninga said.

Psat is one of five APRS-networked Amateur Radio satellites that will be in
orbit during 2015, and all will appear on the live APRS downlink page. The
others include PCsat-1, in orbit since 2001, QIKcom-1, set to launch in
September, QIKcom-2, set to launch in December, and the ARISS packet radio
system on board the International Space Station since 2007.

BRICsat will carry a PSK31 transponder with a 28.120 MHz uplink (2.5 kHz
bandwidth) and a UHF FM downlink on 435.350 MHz. Gunter’s Space Page describes
USS Langley as “a proof-of-concept mission for providing global Internet access
via a nanosatellite constellation.” The satellite will act as a web server and
router in space, using Internet Protocol and Linux. Downlinks 437.475 MHz (9600
baud AX.25 packet telemetry) with uplink at 145.825 MHz. The IARU coordination
page said that while 28.120 MHz is not in the band plan as a satellite
frequency, “the panel considered the motivation for this frequency as to give
lower class license holders in the US the opportunity to participate in the
project.”

Bruninga said satellite experiments such as Psat “serve our educational and
outreach goals for student projects encouraging young people to be interested
in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.” He said he hopes other schools
will build either additional 145.825 MHz relay satellites or experimental
sensors. “We hope that Psat will be the ‘egg’ in this chicken-egg conundrum,”
he added.

[ANS thanks ARRL Letter for 5/14/2015 for the above information]

———————————————————————

Iowa CubeSat students get ham radio licenses

The University of Iowa reports its students will conduct a Van Allen radiation
belt experiment with the AMSAT Fox CubeSat

Thanks to a proposal by the UI Department of Physics and Astronomy, a group of
senior electrical and computer engineering students will reenact James Van
Allen’s original experiment — this time with updated technology. Group members
Kevin Klosterman KD9CPF, Bryan Senchuk KD9CPD, Tyler Dunkel KE0CHR, and Patrick
Maloney KD9CPD took on the task as a part of their senior design project for
the College of Engineering.

The group is trying to figure out how much energy is emanating from the Van
Allen belts at a specific altitude. To measure that, they’ve built a radiation
sensor attached to a circuit board that will launch into space on a small
satellite. There, the radiation sensor will detect energetic particles  from
the Van Allen belts. The satellite will sit in a low-Earth orbit and circle the
globe every 90 minutes, some data will be transmitted in real time, but all of
it is stored for later transmission.

“I feel like we’ve learned something new every day,” Klosterman says.

Not only did the students have to come up with a design concept, write the
code to run the device, and build the circuit board by hand, they also had to
learn and become licensed ham radio operators as well.

The satellite that the students are using to launch into space is part of the
CubeSat program — an initiative supported by NASA to help give students more
hands-on experience with space research — and is being constructed by AMSAT,
the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, whose mission is to foster amateur
radio participation in space technology. The data from a full day of operating
the experiment will be transmitted from the satellite as it makes a single pass
over the CubeSat tracking station on top of Van Allen Hall.
The final result will be a full mapping of the radiation levels at a low Earth
orbit.

It is hoped the Fox CubeSat with an FM voice transponder will be launched
later this year.

Read the full story at
http://now.uiowa.edu/2015/05/seniors-reenact-van-allen-radiation-belt-
experiments

Each year 100’s of students are introduced to amateur radio through University
CubeSat satellite programs with many going on to get their amateur license.

AMSAT Fox
http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=1113

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA and University of Iowa for the above information]

———————————————————————

Extreme DX satellite contact between UK and Texas

On April 27, 2015 at 1901 GMT, Cuban radio amateur Hector Martinez
W5CBF/CO6CBF achieved a 7537.8 km DX contact with UK amateur Peter Atkins G4DOL
via FO-29.

Hector reported, “I am pleased to report that Peter G4DOL and I had another
extreme QSO on FO-
29. It is my furthest contact on the birds!

Back on October 2013, Peter and I had a very nice contact between EL92sd,
Cienfuegos, Cuba and IO80so, Weymouth area, UK. It was a 7286 km contact and
probably the first contact between UK and Cuba on FO-29!

Peter and I desired to try again on FO-29, this time between EM21hs, Texas, US
and his habitual spot in IO80so. We were able to complete a very nice CW
contact on the 92319 orbit of FO-29. Peter had just 0.1 degree as maxim
elevation while I had 0.8 during the 80 seconds mutual window.

As before, Peter did all the hard work by driving until his habitual spot at a
cliff-top and setting up his “portable satellite station” (19 elements Yagi for
435 MHz and 10 elements Yagi for 145 MHz both with horizontal polarization). FO-
29 was sounding really good on these orbits. It was a solid 559 satellite
contact, we were very impressed.

We made the calculations using our 10 digit grid squares at
http://no.nonsense.ee/qth/map.html

The distance between the stations was 7537.799 km (4683.77 mi). To my
knowledge, the longest distance achieved on FO-29 until now had been 7,533.685
km between Frank, K4FEG and Erich, DK1TB
http://www.qrz.com/db/k4feg

UPDATE 2015-05-08: K4KEG has now revised his distance to 7,538.685 km. This
puts his contact with DK1TB just ahead of that of W5CBF and G4DOL.

It appears that an even longer distance is achievable. It has been reported
that FO-29 has a “theoretical maximum range” of 7502 km, but I guess that at
least 7600km is doable. We will try to break our own record!

This contact was possible thanks to the great feature implemented on SatPC32
V12.8b. There is an option of seeing the frequency you are at the satellite
receiver at any time during a pass. It allows the operators to tune the right
frequencies and attempt a contact without having to search for each other.

Thanks very much to Peter for his persistence, effort and all the fun!”

2013 FO-29 satellite contact between Cuba and the UK
http://amsat-uk.org/2013/10/20/fo-29-satellite-contact-between-cuba-and-the-uk/

FO-29 information
http://amsat-uk.org/satellites/two-way-comms-satellites/fuji-oscar-29-jas-2/

[ANS thanks Hector, W5CBF/CO6CBF and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

International Space Station Partners Adjust Spacecraft Schedule

NASA and its international partners agreed Tuesday to set a new schedule for
spacecraft traffic to and from the International Space Station.

The partner agencies agreed to adjust the schedule after hearing the Russian
Federal Space Agency’s (Roscosmos) preliminary findings on the recent loss of
the Progress 59 cargo craft. The exact dates have not yet been established, but
will be announced in the coming weeks. Roscosmos expects to provide an update
about the Progress 59 investigation on Friday, May 22.

The return to Earth for NASA’s Terry Virts, ESA (European Space Agency)
astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti and Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov now is
targeted for early June. NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts
Mikhail Kornienko and Gennady Padalka will remain aboard the station to begin
Expedition 44.

The next Russian cargo craft, Progress 60, will launch in early July to
deliver several tons of food, fuel and supplies. The space station has
sufficient supplies to support crews until the fall of 2015.

The Soyuz spacecraft carrying Expedition 44’s Kjell Lindgren of NASA, Oleg
Kononenko of Roscosmos, and Kimiya Yui of the Japan Aerospace Exploration
Agency, will launch in late July from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

The date of SpaceX’s seventh resupply flight under its commercial resupply
services contract with NASA still is under review but remains targeted for no
earlier than June 19. The mission will deliver to station additional supplies
and research that improve life on Earth and drive progress toward future space
exploration. It also will deliver the first of two international docking
adapters, which will enable future commercial crew vehicles to dock to the
orbiting laboratory.

Additional 2015 space station-related launch dates also are under review.

NASA will continue to update the launch schedule online at:
http://www.nasa.gov/launchschedule

For more information about the International Space Station, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/station

[ANS thanks NASA for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country.  Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, May 15-17 2015, Dayton Hamvention in
Dayton OH (Hara Arena)

*Thursday, 21 May 2015 – International Microwave Symposium 2015 in
Phoenix AZ

*Saturday, 6 June 2015 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show Low AZ

*Friday and Saturday, 12-13 June 2015 – HAM-COM in Irving TX (west of
Dallas)

*Thursday, 9 July 2015 – presentation for the Escondido Amateur Radio
Society in Escondido CA

*Friday and Saturday, 7-8 August 2015 – Austin Summerfest in Austin TX

*Saturday and Sunday, 22-23 August 2015 – Boxboro Hamfest and ARRL
New England Convention in Boxborough MA

*Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, October 16-18 2015, AMSAT Symposium in
Dayton OH (Dayton Crown Plaza)

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Upcoming ARISS Contacts

It is unlikely that there will be any contacts with the Columbus module
station until after a crew change, which will probably occur in late June or
July.
Watch
http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html
for information about upcoming contacts as they are scheduled.

****************************************************************************

Latest ARISS News

* Gagarin from Outer Space: A contact was successful Thu 2015-05-07 at 08:30
UTC with Ryazan State Radio Technical University, Ryazan, Russia, direct via
RK3SWB. The ISS callsign was RSØISS, and the astronaut was Mikhail Korniyenko,
RN3BF.

* A contact was successful Sat 2015-05-09 08:20 UTC between Kursk, Russia, WWII
veterans, direct via TBD. The ISS callsign was RSØISS, and the astronaut was
Gennady Padalka, RN3DT.

* Contacts on Sat 2015-05-09 09:52:06 UTC 27 deg with Istituto Tecnico
Industriale Statale “Enrico Fermi,” Lucca, Italy, direct via IQ5LU, and with
Studi di Firenze – Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto Fiorentino,
Italy, direct via IQ5PO, were both successful. The ISS callsign was IRØISS, and
the astronaut was Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF, who answered 22 questions.
There were several hundred in attendance at both locations, along with
newspaper and TV media. The event was streamed live on the Web.

State Technical Industrial Institute is named for Enrico Fermi and is located
in Lucca, Northern Tuscany. Five year courses are offered in Mechanics,
Electrotechnics, Electronics, Information, and Communication Tecnology with
several laboratories. There are about 700 students, aged 15 through 19. The
school had an Amateur Radio Club with the callsign IK5YOI (license expired).

[ANS thanks ARISS, and Charlie, AJ9N for the above information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

* Reminder: Cambi-Hams DXpedition to Mull Island is Active May 15-21

The Cambi-Hams group is going to activate Mull, Inner Hebrides (IOSA NH15,
SCOTIA CN10, WW Loc. IO76EJ) from May 15 to 21. They plan to be active on 80-
10m on SSB, CW, RTTY, and PSK; also on 6m, 4m, and 2m, and on satellites: AO-7
(Mode B), FO-29, SO-50, and AO-73. The group also hopes for short trips to Iona
(EU-008) and Treshnish Island (EU-108), see their website for updates on that.
QSL via ClubLog OQRS or via bureau.
http://dx.camb-hams.com/

Watch AMSAT’s Upcoming Satellite Operations page for late breaking news about
DX and grid operations:
http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=3921

[ANS thanks the DXNL Newsletter 1936 for May 13, 2015 for the above information]

First all CW 73 on 73 Award

Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, reports,
“Congratulations to Hideo Kambayashi, JH3XCU, for working 73 different stations
on AO-73 since September 1, 2014. Notably, he is the first to work all 73
different stations using CW.”

For more information on the award see
http://amsat-uk.org/funcube/73-on-73-award/

AO-73 was launched on November 21, 2013 and is the first spacecraft to have a
primary mission of educational outreach to schools and the smallest ever
satellite to carry a linear (SSB/CW) transponder for radio amateurs.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

New NASA Deputy Administrator is a Radio Ham

Prof. Dava Newman KB1HIK was sworn in as NASA Deputy Administrator on May 15
from her MIT office.

Her appointment had been confirmed by the U.S. Senate on April 27. NASA
Administrator Charles Bolden (formerly KE4IQB) said, “I am delighted with the
Senate confirmation of Dr. Dava Newman to be the deputy administrator of NASA.
The strong bipartisan support Dr. Newman received in the Senate is a reflection
of her well-earned reputation and renown as a global leader in science and
technology research and policy.”

Newman is a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and of engineering
systems. On the MIT faculty since 1993, she directs the Institute’s Technology
and Policy Program and MIT Portugal Program, and is co-director of the
Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics’ Man Vehicle Laboratory. She is a
Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology faculty member, and a
Margaret McVicar Faculty Fellow.

Her research has included modeling human performance in low and micro-gravity
conditions, examining the dynamics and control of astronaut motion, and the
development of assisted walking devices for the physically handicapped. Perhaps
her most prominent project has been development of the BioSuit, a skintight
spacesuit that would give astronauts unprecedented comfort and freedom in
exploration of planetary surfaces and extra-vehicular activity.

After accepting the confirmation, Newman said, “It’s an enormous honor to
serve at NASA in times when our country is extending humanity’s reach into
space while strengthening American leadership here on Earth. I’m profoundly
grateful to President Obama, the United States Senate, and Administrator Bolden
— along with everyone at MIT. I can’t wait to come aboard.”

http://amsat-uk.org/2015/05/16/new-nasa-deputy-administrator-is-a-radio-ham/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE SPECIAL BULLETIN
ANS-135

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Fox-1 News From Dayton
* AMSAT FieldOps Team Fox-1 Operating Guide is Available

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-135.01
ANS-135 AMSAT News Service Special Bulletin

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 135.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
May 15, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-135.01

Fox-1 News From Dayton

During the Dayton Hamvention, AMSAT Vice President Operations, Drew
Glasbrenner, KO4MA, and AMSAT Vice President – Engineering Jerry Buxton,
N0JY, provided more information about the Fox-1 satellites under
development. Buxton, N0JY, says Fox-1A has passed all environmental testing
and is integrated into the P-POD deployment canister. “The ‘remove before
flight pin’ has been pulled, the doors closed on the P-POD, and everything
is aboard the shipping container now en route to Vandenberg Air Force Base
in California for launch”, said Buxton.

Previously Buxton had announced plans to incorporate an L band receiver in
Fox-1C and Fox-1D. The addition will allow ground commanded selection of the
U/v (normal Fox-1 bands) or the new L/v 1.2 GHz (23 cm) mode. Both bands
will operate as FM single channel. (See: http://www.amsat.org/?p=4000)

During the satellite operations segment of the AMSAT Forum Glasbrenner
provided the details of the uplink and downlink frequencies for the Fox-1 FM
cubesat fleet.

Fox-1 Frequencies

Uplink FM (67 Hz tone)             Downlink FM

Fox-1A             435.180 MHz                    145.980 MHz

RadFxSat/Fox-1B*   435.250 MHz                    145.960 MHz

Fox-1C*            435.300 MHz                    145.920 MHz
1267.300 MHz **                 145.920 MHz

Fox-1D*            435.350 MHz                    145.880 MHz
1267.350 MHz **                 145.880 MHz

* Pending IARU Coordination, If needed, changes will be announced
** U/v and L/v operations switchable by command station,
not operational simultaneously

According to Buxton, the team is planning to have an affordable L band
uplink ground station available to amateurs by the time Fox-1C is on orbit.

+ Fox-1A will launch on a NASA ELaNa flight scheduled during the
third quarter, 2015 from Vandenberg AFB. Fox-1A is a passenger
aboard this launch driven by the schedule of the primary payload.
When updates are available with firm dates they will be announced
via the ANS bulletins and in the AMSAT Journal.

+ Fox-1B will fly with the Vanderbilt University radiation
experiments expected in 2016.

+ Fox-1C will launch on Spaceflight’s maiden mission of the SHERPA
multi-cubesat deployer on a SpaceX Falcon 9 flight planned for
late 2015.

+ Fox-1D is a flight spare for Fox-1C. If not needed as a spare
it will fly with the University of Iowa HERCI radiation mapping
experiment.

+ Fox-1E “Evolution” will carry a Mode J linear transponder. The
transponder is planned to be 30 kHz wide and will also have a
1200 bps BPSK telemetry beacon. Launch opportunities are being
developed, to be announced at a later date.

AMSAT has an immediate need to raise funds to cover both the launch contract
and additional materials for construction and testing for Fox-1C. Please
help us to continue to keep amateur radio in space. Donations may be made
via the:

+ Paypal and credit card payment on the AMSAT website at
http://www.amsat.org

+ Donation link in the AMSAT store:
http://store.amsat.org/catalog/

+ Call the AMSAT office at (888) 322-6728

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Engineering and AMSAT Operations Teams for the above
information]

——————————————————————–

AMSAT FieldOps Team Fox-1 Operating Guide is Available

AMSAT’s Director of Field Operations, Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK, invites you
to view and download the “Fox-1 Operating Guide” which was released at the
2015 Dayton Hamvention. This color PDF file is designed to print
double-sided. Two different resolution versions are available:

+ Low resolution PDF suitable for on-screen display (~400 KB size)

+ High resolution, press quality PDF for hard-copy printing (~2 MB size)

To access these files visit the AMSAT web and follow the path:

http://www.amsat.org –> Satellite Info –> Station and Operating Hints.

The direct link is http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=2144 where you’ll find the
link to the Guide.

[ANS thanks the AMSAT FieldOps Team for the above information]

/EX

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-130

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Deadline for 2015 TAPR/AMSAT Banquet ticket is Tuesday, May 12th at 1800 EDT
* AMSAT at Dayton Hamvention 2015
* Work Fox-1A at Dayton
* Top 10 Reasons to Come to Dayton
* 7th European CubeSat Symposium
* ISS Ham Video transmitter now transmitting
* NASA Hosts Media Call on Draft Solicitation for New Class of Launch Services

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-130.01
ANS-130 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 130.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
May 10, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-130.01

Deadline for 2015 TAPR/AMSAT Banquet ticket is Tuesday, May 12th at 1800 EDT

The speaker at the 2015 TAPR/AMSAT Banquet will be Michael Ossmann, AD0NR, on
“Adventures of a Hacker Turned Ham.” Tickets ($35 each) MUST be purchased online
in advance at the AMSAT Store no later than 1800 EDT (2300 UTC) Tuesday, May
12th.  Tickets will not be sold at the Hamvention or at the door.

Tickets purchased online may be collected at the AMSAT booth (433-435, 444-446).
More information may be found at http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=190.

[ANS thanks Alan, WA4SCA, for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT at Dayton Hamvention 2015

The AMSAT theme for this year is “Year of The Fox”, as we expect to launch
both Fox-1A and Fox-1C in 2015 and we’re announcing the plans for Fox-1D and
Fox-1E.

The AMSAT booth is in the same location inside the Ball Arena as last year,
in booths 433-435 and 444-446. The Tracking Software Demos (433) and
Engineering & Education (434-435) are across the aisle from the Beginner’s
Corner (444) and Membership, Books & Shirts (445-446). The closest entrance
to the AMSAT booth is the Ball Arena entrance (Door 1) at the southeast
corner of the building. The satellite QSO demonstrations will be outside
across from the entrance to the Ball Arena.

AMSAT Forum
———–
The AMSAT forum will be Saturday morning from 11:15 a.m. through 1:30 p.m.
in Forum Room 5, close to the AMSAT booth. See the commercial vendor layout
map in the Hamvention program or the Hamvention website for the location of
Forum Room 5 (same as the last few years).

The following speakers will be presenting at the AMSAT Forum:

+ Moderator: Alan Biddle, WA4SCA

+ “AMSAT Status Report.” Barry Baines, WD4ASW, AMSAT-NA President,
will highlight recent activities within AMSAT and discuss some
of the challenges, accomplishments, and exciting projects of the
organization.

+ “ARISS Report 2015″ Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, AMSAT-NA Vice President
for Human Spaceflight, will discuss ARISS development & operations
on the International Space Station.

+ “AMSAT-NA Fox Satellite Program.” Jerry Buxton, N0JY, AMSAT-NA
Engineering Vice President, will discuss the upcoming launches
of four Fox spacecraft and exciting new engineering developments.

+ “AMSAT Satellite Operations.” Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA, AMSAT-NA
Operations Vice President, will discuss current satellites, as
well as those planned for launch in the next year.

+ “AMSAT’s Skunk Works.” Tom Clark, K3IO, AMSAT-NA President
Emeritus, will discuss some innovative R&D items for future
spacecraft.

+ “Amateur Satellites, Education, and You!” EMike McCardel, KC8YLD,
AMSAT-NA Educational Relations Vice President, will discuss the
resources and equipment which supports the educational goals of
AMSAT-NA.

On-the-air Satellite Demonstrations
———————————–

Keith Pugh, W5IU and other volunteers will be conducting satellite
demonstrations during the Hamvention. They will be demonstrating satellite
operation using a manual station to work all the currently available FM
satellites and SSB satellites. Hamvention has provided us a nice fenced area
right outside the Ball Arena entrance in which to do our satellite
demonstrations. A schedule of satellite passes for the Hamvention will be
available in the Beginner’s Corner and in the demonstration area.

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Dayton Hamvention Posse for the above information]

———————————————————————

Work Fox-1A at Dayton

Bring your HT to Dayton Hamvention, you can work each other on the Fox-1
engineering unit repeater at the AMSAT Engineering Booth!

Uplink:   435.180 MHz FM, CTCSS 67.0 Hz
Downlink: 145.980 MHz FM ± Doppler (which should be minimal)

[ANS thanks Jerry Buxton, N0JY, AMSAT VP Engineering, for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Top 10 Reasons to Come to Dayton

10. Rub shoulders with 25,000 of your best friends at the largest hamfest
in the United States, including nearly all of the AMSAT Directors and
senior officers.

9. Find out how to organize a contact with the astronauts on the
International Space Station for your local school or youth group from our
Education and ARISS experts.

8. Pickup the latest AMSAT golf shirts, T-shirts, and hats.  Get your copy
of the updated “Amateur Satellite Frequency Guide” (laminated frequency
chart) and Gould Smith’s just revised “Getting Started with Amateur
Satellites” (book).  We’ll also have assembled wide-band preamps that are
great for portable operation.

7. See the latest equipment from Icom, Yaesu, Kenwood, Flex, Alinco, M2,
Arrow, and many other manufacturers of amateur radio equipment and
accessories.  Take advantage of discounted pricing you won’t find anywhere
else.

6. See demonstrations of SatPC32 and MacDoppler satellite tracking
software, and get your operational questions answered.  Meet Don Agro,
author of MacDoppler (Friday & Saturday, 2-3 p.m.).  See a demonstration
of the LVB Tracker, a computer interface to the Yaesu azimuth-elevation
rotors.  Talk with Mike Young, who has built more LVB Trackers than anyone
else.  Assembled LVB Trackers will be available.

5. Hear the latest on the *five* Fox satellites, the geosynchronous
rideshare opportunity, the International Space Station, other current and
future satellites, Education news, and an AMSAT update at the AMSAT Forum
Saturday, from 11:15 to 1:30.

4. Get one-on-one guidance on setting up your satellite station and making
contacts at our “Beginner’s Corner”.  Witness live demonstrations of
contacts through satellites AO-7, FO-29, SO-50, AO-73, and the Fox-1C
engineering model using handheld antennas.

3. Bring your dual-band HT and listen (on 2m FM) to the Fox-1A engineering
model, and transmit through the model on 70cm.  Meet and interact with
some of the Engineering Team members working on the Fox-1 satellites.

2. Get satellite station and operating tips from some of the best
satellite operators in the country, including John Papay K8YSE (1,405
grids confirmed), Doug Papay KD8CAO (1,045 grids), Drew Glasbrenner KO4MA
(1,036 grids), Paul Stoetzer (444 grids), and Keith Pugh W5IU (ARISS
Mentor).

1. Receive special premiums when you join or renew your AMSAT membership
at Dayton, including an updated “Amateur Satellite Frequency Guide”
(laminated frequency chart), an AMSAT pen/stylus, and special pricing on
the SatPC32 satellite tracking software.

[ANS thanks Steve, N9IP, for the above information]

———————————————————————

7th European CubeSat Symposium

7th European CubeSat Symposium that will take place at Liège (Belgium) on 9-11
September 2015. The Symposium is co-organized by the von Karman Institute and
the University of Liege (Space Structures and Systems Laboratory). As in the
previous years, the Symposium is open to all CubeSat community around the World.

For more information and deadlines, please visit the symposium website
www.cubesatsymposium.eu

Please remember to submit your abstract before the 15th June 2015.
If you are a student, please apply for the sponsorship before that date.

The Symposium will be followed by a short course in astrodynamics organized by
the University of Liège (more information at this link).

[ANS thanks Dr. Masutti for the above information]

———————————————————————

ISS Ham Video transmitter now transmitting

Friday May 1st, 2015 the Ham Video transmitter on board the Columbus
module of the International Space Station was powered on and started
transmitting in “Blank Transmission” (BT) mode.

In this mode, the transmitter is operated without camera. The digital
TV signal is fully formatted, but the content of the video is black
and the content of the audio is at zero level. From a technical
perspective, the BT signal is all that is needed for testing and fine
tuning ground stations.

The European network of chained ground stations is presently nearly
complete. Six ground stations span the continent in “X”  formation.
For each ascending pass over Europe, four stations provide about ten
minutes of solid copy and the same is true for descending passes:

–    Ascending passes: Lisbon (Portugal ==> Poitiers (France) ==>
Casale Monferrato (North Italy ==> Kolo (Poland)
–    Descending passes : Cork (Ireland) ==> Poitiers (France) ==>
Casale Monferrato (North Italy ==> Matera (South Italy.

The chained ground stations are streaming the digital video to the
BATC server (British Amateur Television Club). BATC  set up a
multiviewer page, accessible at:

http://www.batc.tv/iss/

The page shows all six streams from the chained  ground stations. Each
view can be maximized to full screen and the audio of each stream can
be set to level or muted.

Presently, active stations stream technical data provided by the
software developed by Jean Pierre Courjaud F6DZP. Several data are
most interesting to observe:
–    the “constellations”, which visualize the QPSK (quaternary PSK)
modulated signal
–    the  digital Signal/Noise ratio = MER (dB) (Modulation Error Ratio)
–    the control LEDs that change from red to green on decoding the
digital signal.

The Ham Video transmitter frequency is 2395MHz and the symbol rate is 2.0Ms/sec.
More information is available at:

http://www.ariss-eu.org/columbus.htm

The Ham Video transmitter will stay on as long as on board operations
permit. When the ground stations will be operating reliably, the Ham
Video transmitter will be used to enhance ARISS school contacts.
Uplink will remain VHF audio only. This operational mode is dubbed
ARISS Ham TV.

[ANS thanks Gaston, ON4WF, for the above information]

———————————————————————

NASA Hosts Media Call on Draft Solicitation for New Class of Launch Services

NASA’s Launch Services Program has issued a draft Request for Proposal (RFP) for
a new Venture Class Launch Services (VCLS), which would be commercial launch
services for small satellites and experiments on science missions using a
smaller than currently available class of rockets.
NASA Logo

NASA will host a media teleconference at 1 p.m. EDT Monday, May 11 to discuss
this strategic initiative, the RFP and the expectation for this class of launch
services.

At present, launch opportunities for small satellites — often called CubeSats
or nanosatellites — and small science missions are mostly limited to ride-share
type arrangements, flying only when space is available on NASA and other
launches. The Launch Services Program seeks to develop alternatives to this
approach and help foster other launch services dedicated to transporting smaller
payloads into orbit. The services acquired through such a contract will
constitute the smallest class of launch services used by NASA.

Participants in the media briefing are:

Mark Wiese, chief, Flight Projects Branch, Launch Services Program Business
Office, NASA’s Kennedy Space Center
Garrett Skrobot, mission manager, Educational Launch of Nanosatellites
(ELaNa), Launch Services Program, NASA’s Kennedy Space Center

This solicitation, and resulting contract or contracts, is intended to
demonstrate a dedicated launch capability for smaller payloads that NASA
anticipates it will require on a recurring basis for future science and CubeSat
missions. CubeSats already are used in markets, such as imagery collection and
analysis. In the future, CubeSat capabilities will include abilities, such as
ship and aircraft tracking, improved weather prediction, and broader Internet
coverage.

NASA intends to award one or more firm fixed-price VCLS contracts to accommodate
132 pounds (60 kilograms) of CubeSats a single launch or two launches carrying
66 pounds (30 kilograms) each. The launch provider will determine the launch
location and date, but the launch must occur by April 15, 2018.

To listen to the media teleconference, call 321-867-1220, 321-867-1240 or
321-867-1260 or listen online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

Media may participate in the briefing by calling the Kennedy Space Center news
center at 321-867-2468 within 15 minutes prior to the start of Monday’s
teleconference to obtain a passcode for voice access.

The draft RFP is open for written questions and comments from industry entities
until Wednesday, May 20. The final RFP, if issued, is anticipated to be released
in June. The draft RFP may be accessed at:

http://go.nasa.gov/1KMTeDR

For more information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/home/CubeSats_initiative.html

NASA’s Launch Services Program is focused on assuring the availability of long-
term launch services for NASA while also promoting the continued evolution of
the U.S. commercial space launch market. The capability anticipated to meet the
requirement for a smaller launch vehicle represents an emerging category of
launch services.

For more information about NASA’s Launch Services Program, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/launchingrockets/index.html

[ANS thanks NASA for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-123

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Announcing EO-79 transponder testing for one full orbit – May 4
* EO-79 / QB50p1 First Transponder Test Success
* 2015 AMSAT-NA Board of Directors Nominations Notice
* “Where Over the World Is Astronaut Scott Kelly?” Geography From
Space Trivia Contest
* Delfi-C3 has been in orbit 7 years
* $50SAT/MO-76/Eagle-2 Update
* 2015 ARRL/TAPR DCC (Digital Communications Conference) Announced
* AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention – Fourth call for volunteers
* AMSAT Plans Dayton Rollout for 2015 “Getting Started” Satellite Book
* AMSAT FieldOps Team SO-50 Operating Guide is Available
* AMSAT-SM donates $1600 USD for the FOX satellite project
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over
SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-123
ANS-123 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 123
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
May 3, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-123
Announcing EO-79 transponder testing for one full orbit – May 4

Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG from AMSAT-NL reported via the AMSAT-BB that
on Monday May, there is a fairly high chance that the AMSAT-NL
transponder will be tested for one full orbit.

Details will be made available on short notice, but the target time
for an activation starts at approximately 08:30 UTC and may last
until about 10:10 UTC.

The aim of the test is to characterize the power budget on board EO-
79. Usage of the transponder is being encourage. Please also report
the QSOs and signal reports to pa3weg at amsat.org

[ANS thanks Wouter Wouter PA3WEG for the above information]
———————————————————————
EO-79 / QB50p1 First Transponder Test Success

AMSAT-NL is delighted to announce that an initial series of tests of
the FUNcube transponder payload aboard the QB50p1 CubeSat have been
successfully completed.

QB50p1 is one of two QB50 precursor spacecraft that were launched
from Yasny in Russia in June 2014.

The primary science payloads are still being extensively tested but
it has now been possible to undertake a short test of the transponder
payload as well. The transponder is intended as a long term secondary
mission following the initial technology demonstration and de-risking
phase.

After spending ten months in space, the transponder was commanded on
for short periods during each of the three morning passes over Europe
on Monday 27th April 2015. A number of FUNcube team members in the
Netherlands and in the UK were standing by to run through a
predefined test plan.

The transponder has a similar performance to that of FUNcube-1 but
the passband is nominally 5 kHz wider by design.

It is not yet known when this transponder may be available for
regular usage but AMSAT-NL is delighted to be able to report that the
hardware is functioning and is very grateful to the QB50 project, the
Von Karman Institute and ISIS B.V. for their ongoing support.

More information about the QB50 project can be found at
https://www.qb50.eu/

AMSAT-NL: http://amsat-nl.org

AMSAT-UK: http://amsat-uk.org

[ANS Thanks Graham G3VZV for the above information]
———————————————————————
2015 AMSAT-NA Board of Directors Nominations Notice

It is time to submit nominations for the upcoming AMSAT-NA Board of
Directors election. Four director’s terms expire this year: Barry
Baines, WD4ASW, Alan Biddle, WA4SCA, Mark Hammond, N8MH, and Jerry
Buxton, N0JY. In addition, up to two Alternates may be elected for
one year terms.

A valid nomination requires either one Member Society or five
current individual members in good standing to nominate an AMSAT-NA
member for Director. Written nominations, consisting of the nominee’s
name and call, and the nominating individual’s names, calls and
individual signatures should be mailed to: AMSAT-NA, 10605 Concord
St, #304 Kensington, MD 20895-2526. In addition to traditional
submissions of written nominations, which is the preferred method,
the intent to nominate someone may be made by electronic means. These
include e-mail, Fax, or electronic image of a petition. Electronic
petitions should be sent to MARTHA at AMSAT.ORG or Faxed to (301) 822-
4371. No matter what means is used, petitions MUST arrive no later
than June 15th at the AMSAT-NA office. If the nomination is a
traditional written nomination, no other action is required. If it is
other than this, i.e. electronic, a verifying traditional written
petition MUST be received at the AMSAT-NA office at the above address
within 7 days following the close of nominations on June 15th.

ELECTRONIC SUBMISSIONS WITHOUT THIS SECOND, WRITTEN VERIFICATION ARE
NOT VALID UNDER THE EXISTING AMSAT-NA BYLAWS.

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Office for the above information]
———————————————————————
“Where Over the World Is Astronaut Scott Kelly?” Geography From
Space Trivia Contest

During his year-long stay on the International Space Station,
astronaut Scott Kelly wants to test your knowledge of the world
through a geography trivia game on Twitter. Traveling more than 220
miles above Earth, and at 17,500 miles per hour, he circumnavigates
the globe more than a dozen times a day. This gives Kelly the
opportunity to see and photograph various geographical locations on
Earth. In fact, part of his job while in space is to capture images
of Earth for scientific observations.

Follow @StationCDRKelly on Twitter and each Wednesday, Kelly will
tweet a picture and ask the public to identify the place depicted in
the photo. The first person to identify the place correctly will win
an autographed copy of the picture. Kelly plans to continue posting
weekly contest photos until he returns from the space station in
March 2016.

For more information, visit
http://tinyurl.com/ANS123-ScottKelly.

To learn more about the One-Year Mission, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/content/one-year-crew.

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message for April 30, 2015
for the above information]
———————————————————————
Delfi-C3 has been in orbit 7 years

As of April 28, Delfi-C3 has been in orbit 7 years.

Wouter Weggelaarb, PA3WEG, reports, “When we designed Delfi-C3, no-
one would have dreamed it would last this long.

“The satellite still remains healthy and strong. We are delighted to
still get the support of the ham radio community and in all those
years there have been very few days where no telemetry was decoded
and submitted. Thank you very much to those still decoding and
sending in telemetry and also to those still signing up for new
accounts.

“Delfi-C3 has been praised numerous times as the ideal example of a
cooperation of radio amateurs and an university and the team is very
proud of that. Together we have demonstrated the first successful
Distributed Ground Station Network (DGSN) built around radio
amateurs. We as a community can be very proud of this achievement!
Without your continued support, this would not have been possible.”

Wouer goes on to report that they may need to re-locate their data
collection server. When this happens he will report appropriate
updates to the AMSAT-BB.

[ANS Thanks Wouter PA3WEG for the above information]
———————————————————————
$50SAT/MO-76/Eagle-2 Update

The following status of $50sat/MO-76, one of the first Pocketqubes,
was recently posted by Michael Kirkhart,KD8QBA on the 50dollarsat
Yahoo group. Here is an excerpt:

“17 Months in Space, Still Working, and How Long Will a $10 Camera
Battery last

“Tuesday, April 21, 2015 marked the 17 month anniversary of the
launch of $50SAT/MO-76/Eagle-2, and believe or not, it is still
operating. Unfortunately, the battery capacity has degraded to the
point where the satellite spends a significant amount of time with
the battery voltage below the 3300 mV minimum required for enabling
the transmitter. As a result, those of us who live in the northern
hemisphere no longer hear any transmissions during the evening
passes, and for now, rarely hear any during the daytime passes as
well. The last telemetry packet I captured here in EN82 land was
April 21, and the last one which was error-free on April 10.
Fortunately, I have been able hear it operate over Anton’s (ZR6AIC)
WebSDR station in South Africa during the evening passes (which occur
between 4:00 and 6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time), and occasionally am
able to capture error-free telemetry packets. The last one available
is from April 24 at 21:25 UTC.

“This situation was fully expected; when looking at the battery
voltage chart (which, along with all the other telemetry, is
available from our Dropbox at
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/l3919wtfiywk2gf/AABRl4iM5BFqVAcLQGSmdsVga/
Telemetryanalysis/Current-Telemetry)
the readings took a large drop sometime after February 12. Given
this was a $10 camera battery that had gone through over 6,000
orbits, each with temperature swings of -30 degrees C to +30 degrees
C, it is surprising it has lasted this long! At this point, it is
starting to behave more like a large capacitor than a battery.

“As we get closer to summer here in the northern hemisphere (and
after this winter, it cannot come soon enough), $50SAT/MO-76/Eagle-2
will spend more time in the sun before it makes each pass; this means
it will be warm enough to enable solar power sooner in the pass, and
makes it more likely it we will be able to hear it transmit before it
disappears over the southern horizon. Those of you who live in the
southern hemisphere, however, should still be able to hear it during
both daytime and evening passes. If you could, we would certainly
appreciate any telemetry you could gather and post.

“The orbit continues to decay at an average rate of about 1.5
km/week; apogee is just below 570 km at 569.8 km, and perigee is at
538.2 km. Someday, I will attempt to determine when it might actually
de-orbit. If any of you have access to STK or some other fancy
software which might be able to do a de-orbit prediction, please feel
free to run a simulation and let us all know. Some basic parameters
you might need are as follows:

TLEs as of 2015-04-24, 23:53:15 UTC:

EAGLE 2
1 39436U 13066W 15114.82864817 .00033340 00000-0 23789-2 0 9991
2 39436 97.7463 190.7550 0022811 281.2509 78.6152 15.04244039 77466

Using these, the following can be computed:
Semi-major axis = 5743.7488705249 km
Apogee = 569.7766621696 km
Perigee = 538.1516552847
Average cross-sectional area = 0.014252 m^2
Mass = 210 g
Area/mass ratio = 0.06787 m^2/kg

In the meantime, I will continue to update the Dropbox with any new
telemetry gathered. Please keep it coming, even if it has errors or
is incomplete. At this point, we are happy to simply know that it is
still operating.”

[ANS Thanks Howie DeFelice AB2S and Michael Kirkhart, KD8QBA for the
above information]
———————————————————————
2015 ARRL/TAPR DCC (Digital Communications Conference) Announced

The 2015 DCC will be in Chicago on October 9 – 11
in the northwest suburb of Arlington Heights not far from O’Hare
airport.The DCC has two full days of Technical presentations on
Friday & Saturday and on Sunday morning a deep dive into a technical
subject.
On Saturday there is a full day of concurrent Introductory sessions.
Be sure to register for the DCC and reserve your hotel room early.
DCC information is available at:
http://www.tapr.org/dccLook forward to your participation in the DCC.

TAPR at Dayton Hamvention
TAPR will have booths, forums and a joint banquet with AMSAT at the
Dayton Hamvention. Details about TAPR activities at the Hamvention
are available at: http://www.tapr.org/dayton

[ANS thanks Mark WB9QXB for the above information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention – Fourth call for volunteers

The Dayton Hamvention is less than three weeks away!

Last year, we had 52 people assist with the AMSAT booth at Dayton.
We’ve had a good response so far to our call for volunteers, but we
could really use another 10-15 people.

The interaction with AMSAT members, satellite operators, designers,
and builders makes the whole experience a lot of fun. Meet or renew
acquaintances, exchange operating tips, and find out what antennas,
software and equipment other AMSAT members use. We currently expect
all of the AMSAT senior officers and 5 of the 7 board members to be
there too.

The 2015 Hamvention is May 15-17. Would you consider helping AMSAT
at Dayton this year?

If you’re an experienced operator, great! We can use you and your
experience.

If you’ve never operated a satellite before, but want to learn more,
that’s OK. We can use your help too.

Whether you’re available for only a couple of hours or if you can
spend the entire weekend with us, your help would be greatly
appreciated.

Please send an e-mail to Steve, n9ip@amsat.org if you can help.
Thank you!

[ANS thanks Steve N9IP for the above information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT Plans Dayton Rollout for 2015 “Getting Started” Satellite Book

Gould Smith’s book, “Getting Started With Amateur Satellites”, is
being updated to tell you all about how you can get ready to operate
through the Fox-1 satellites launching later this year. Additional
chapters in the book tell you about tracking software, orbital
mechanics, antennas, radios, Doppler tuning, and operating
techniques. Chapters are also being added to tell you about the new
satellites soon becoming available for amateur radio.

Going beyond brief descriptions in hamfest flyers, this book will
provide a complete reference for new satellite users to assemble a
basic station and to make your first satellite contacts. Also this
book you will teach you how to incrementally upgrade your initial FM
satellite station, time and budget permitting, to include automated
tracking as well as operating through the CW/SSB linear passband
satellites.

A companion Fox-1A reference sheet is also being planned for release
at Dayton. This will be made available for AMSAT’s FieldOps team for
distribution at hamfests and satellite operating demonstrations.

Watch for the 2015 “Getting Started With Amateur Satellites” book
and reference sheet at the AMSAT booth at the Dayton Hamvention. The
book will also be available in the AMSAT Store shortly after Dayton:
http://store.amsat.org/catalog/

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Office for the above information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT FieldOps Team SO-50 Operating Guide is Available

AMSAT’s Director of Field Operations, Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK says
the FieldOps team is working to make how-to-operate-satellites
information readily available on the web. Based on a hamfest handout
designed and written by Patrick, “Getting Started with the FM
Satellites”, is available for download. Patrick shows the basic
equipment and techniques to learn successful operating on the
satellites. This guide also gives specific information on how to
operate via SO-50, the only currently available FM satellite at the
moment.

Patrick’s guide is posted at:

http://www.amsat.org –> Satellite Info –> Station and Operating
Hints.

The direct link is http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=2144 where you’ll
find the link “Operating FM Satellites” (and a link to the Spanish
version also).

[ANS thanks the AMSAT FieldOps Team for the above information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT-SM donates $1600 USD for the FOX satellite project

”AMSAT-SM believe that FOX project is very important to continue to
develop amateur radio on board satellites. We therefore hope that our
contribution can help the FOX satellites up in space.”

AMSAT-SM in Sweden has aprox 150 members. Membership is currently
free and registration is done online at our website: www.amsat.se

[ANS thanks Lars Thunberg SM0TGU for the above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS News

+ A Successful double contact was made with schools in South Africa
and in Italy. Participants at Sol Plaatje Primary School, Mahikeng,
South Africa and Scuola Secondaria di 1 Grado, Caprino Bergamasco,
Italy queried Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF who was using
the Callsign IRØISS. The contact began 2015-05-02 14:34:27 UTC and
lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was telebridged via
IK1SLD. ARISS Mentor was IZ2GOJ.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Ryazan, Russia, direct via TBD
Contact is a go for Thu 2015-05-07 08:30 UTC
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS
The scheduled astronaut is Mikhail Korniyenko RN3BF

Kursk, Russia, WWII veterans, direct via TBD
Contact is a go for Sat 2015-05-09 08:20 UTC
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS
The scheduled astronaut is Gennady Padalka RN3DT

From 2015-05-11 to 2015-06-14, there will be no US Operational
Segment (USOS) hams on board ISS. So any schools contacts during
this period will be conducted by the ARISS Russia team.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N information]
———————————————————————
Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Grid Master Award # 3
Congratulations to WA4NVM Rick for working and confirming all 488
US grids
GRID MASTER AWARD #3 4-26-2015

+ 5 in EM55 Award
Congratulations to WF7L Jeff for 5 in EM55 award # 58

[ANS Thanks Damon WA4HFN for the above
———————————————————————
/EX

AMSAT User Services and the Editors of the AMSAT New Service pass on
our condolences to ANS Weekly Co-Editor Joe Spier K6WAO and his
family on the death of Joe’s mother this week.

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-116.02

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT-NA Opportunity for Rideshare to Geostationary Orbit
* Nayif-1 CubeSat mission will have FUNcube transponder
* Central States VHF Society Annual Conference, July 23 – 26
* Current and Upcoming Satellite Operations
* AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention – Third call for volunteers
* Design The Next AMSAT Satellite! – Submission Deadline May 30
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over
SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-116.02
ANS-116.02 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 116.02
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
April 26, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-116.02
AMSAT-NA Opportunity for Rideshare to Geostationary Orbit

AMSAT is excited to announce that we have accepted an opportunity to
participate in a potential rideshare as a hosted payload on a
geostationary satellite planned for launch in 2017. An amateur radio
payload, operating in the Amateur Satellite Service, will fly on a
spacecraft which Millennium Space Systems (MSS) of El Segundo, CA is
contracted to design, launch, and operate for the US government based
on their Aquila M8 Series Satellite Structure.

A meeting to discuss this potential rideshare took place on April 13
at Millennium Space Systems that included Dr. Bob McGwier, N4HY;
Franklin Antonio, N6NKF, co-founder of Qualcomm; Jerry Buxton, N0JY,
AMSAT Vice President of Engineering and member of the board for AMSAT-
NA; Dr. Tom Clark, K3IO, Director and President Emeritus of AMSAT-NA;
Phil Karn,KA9Q; and Michelle Thompson, W5NYV.

Hosting the meeting for MSS were Stan Dubyn as founder and chairman
of MSS, Vince Deno as president of MSS, Jeff Ward, K8KA, of MSS as VP
for Product Development, formerly with SSTL and University of Surrey
Space Center, and Ryan Lawrence of MSS as Project Manager on the
spacecraft mission. Attending by telephone were Dr. Jonathan Black,
Associate Research Director of Hume Center for Aerospace Systems and
Associate Professor of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering and Dr.
Michael Parker, KT7D, founder of RINCON Research Corp.

Following the meeting, Dr. Bob McGwier, N4HY, Director of Research
at the Hume Center for National Security and Technology of Virginia
Tech, and former director and former VP Engineering of AMSAT,
described this as an opportunity to go forward with “AMSAT-Eagle”
which, in the 2006-2008 timeframe, evolved into a microwave payload
to be flown to geostationary orbit as a hosted payload. It would have
provided digital communications to small terminals on the ground and
a linear bent pipe transponder had it flown. This failed to go
forward in part due to lack of an affordable flight opportunity.

McGwier outlined the next steps toward developing this mission:

1) To organize an effort at Virginia Tech to make a firm proposal
to MSS and its US government sponsor, and organize an effort
to raise sufficient funds to pay for development of the mission.

2) Enable Dr. Jonathan Black to lead the construction project at
Virginia Tech in the Space@VT Center. Sonya Rowe, KK4NLO, Project
Manager at the Hume Center will be the project manager.

3) Work for development of a low-cost microwave ground station for
amateur radio still needs to be determined.

4) Dr. Michael Parker, KT7D, will solicit the cooperation of the
Rincon Research Corp. for development of the software radio
technology for this payload.

The AMSAT Board of Directors has accepted the invitation to
participate in this potential rideshare payload opportunity. AMSAT
expects to be involved in the development of the ground station and
the payload RF development, and will serve as the amateur radio
(hosted) payload operator once the satellite has been launched.

McGwier summarized, “The launch is currently scheduled for 2017 and
the payload must be delivered for testing and integration by Spring
of 2016. It is an ambitious schedule and all involved will have to
gain and maintain a serious level of commitment to that which they
agree to undertake.” AMSAT President, Barry Baines, WD4ASW, said,
“The AMSAT leadership is excited to fly a Phase-IV geostationary
amateur satellite payload. This is an evolving development as we
collaborate with the VT Hume Center with a project that provides
technical challenges to create a new amateur radio capability in
space that will provide a variety of benefits not only for amateurs
but also for emergency communications and STEM educational outreach.”

The transponder is expected to support a wide range of voice,
digital, and experimental advanced communications technologies. A
decision is expected soon specifying the microwave uplink and
downlink bands.

Additional information on the Aquila M8 Series Satellite can be viewed
on-line:
http://www.millennium-space.com/
http://www.millennium-space.com/platforms#aquila

AMSAT has posted a photo of the GEO opportunity team with the
Millennium Aquila satellite at: http://www.amsat.org.

[ANS thanks Bob McGwier, N4HY and AMSAT-NA for the above information]
———————————————————————
Nayif-1 CubeSat mission will have FUNcube transponder

AMSAT-UK and AMSAT-NL are delighted to announce that a FUNcube
communications package has been selected as a major payload for the
Nayif-1 CubeSat mission.

This mission is intended to provide Emirati students with a tool to
design and test systems in space. It is being developed by the
Emirates Institution for Advanced Science and Technology (EIAST) in
partnership with American University of Sharjah (AUS).

It is expected that this payload will provide a large amount of
valuable environmental data from space together with a new,
enhanced, UHF to VHF linear transponder.

The AMSAT team will be working closely with the Emirati students, in
collaboration with support partner, ISIS – Innovative Solutions In
Space B.V. from the Netherlands, to develop this new system in time
for the launch which is scheduled to take place towards the end of
2015.

This exciting news was announced on April 25, 2015 during the Dutch
“Interessedag Amateursatellieten” or “Satellite Interest Day” event
in Apeldoorn.

More information, with details of frequencies and planned operating
schedules, will be made available as soon as possible.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
Central States VHF Society Annual Conference, July 23 – 26

The Central States VHF Society Annual Conference for 2015 is being
held in the Denver Colorado Metro area between Thursday July 23rd and
Sunday July 26th. The local sponsor this year is Rocky Mountain Ham
Radio. The convention site is the Denver Marriott Westminster; the
venue is available for booking at the Society special conference rate
of $109 per night. Please plan on booking your vacation around the
conference as the special room rate is available from Monday July
20th through Wednesday July 29th.

The conference will feature the traditional activities, Banquet,
Luncheons and hospitality suites, technical programs, noise figure
measurement, antenna range, Rover vehicle show and tell. Speaker for
the Saturday evening banquet is Rick Roderick K5UR First Vice
President of ARRL and an avid VHFer. There are a wide variety of
activities available along the Front Range of Colorado and there will
be an offering of a choice of side trips designed to entertain the
entire family. Operating opportunities under consideration include
operating from the Rocky Mountain Ham Radio remote base station in
Pueblo, microwave operating from local mountain tops and the chance
to score a microwave VUCC in a weekend! Just bring your own
equipment! There will be introductory programs geared to newcomers to
weak signal operation on the VHF+ bands that will be promoted locally
and designed to encourage younger hams to get involved in DX’ing and
contesting.

Conference registration, as well as a link to the conference venue
for bookings, is now available at http://2015.csvhfs.org/ Please
visit the site if you need any other additional information

[ANS thanks Doug K2AD for the above information]
———————————————————————
Current and Upcoming Satellite Operations

The following information is from the AMSAT “Upcoming Satellite
Operations” page that is maintained by Paul Stoetzer N8HM.
The following information was last updated April 25, 2015.
The most current information can be viewed anytime by visiting
http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=3921

Maritime Mobile – Captain Yuri Bodrov, UT1FG/MM, is heading north
from the Panama Canal through the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean en
route to the Port of Sept-Îles in Quebec aboard the M/V Greenwing.
He is active on all satellites as well as six meters and HF from open
water grids. Track his progress on MarineTraffic. Note that Yuri
operates half duplex, so do not attempt to call while he is talking.

Arkansas (EM23/EM33) – Dave Swanson, KG5CCI, will be active on two
passes of FO-29 (2038Z and 2222Z) and one pass of AO-7 (2059Z) from
the EM22/EM23 line just north of Texarkana, AR on April 25, 2015.

Cuba (FL11) – Pavel, CO7WT, is active on SO-50 from FL11 in eastern
Cuba, mostly on evening passes during the week, and all day on
weekends.

Norway (KQ50) – Erling, LA4FPA, will be active from Vardø, Norway
(KQ50ni) with an FT-847 and an Arrow Antenna April 25 – April 30,
2015.

Florida / Dry Tortugas Islands (EL84) – Mike, WA0SPG, will be active
on FO-29 and SO-50 as WA0SPG/4 from the Dry Tortugas (EL84) May 4 –
May 6, 2015. QSL via home call. He will also be active on HF. See the
March 2, 2015 edition of the OPDX Bulletin for more details (Thanks
to John, K8YSE via the AMSAT-BB for this information).

Scotland (IO76) – The Camb Hams will be active on all satellites
from the Isle of Mull as GS3PYE/P May 15 – May 21, 2015. For more
information, see http://dx.camb-hams.com/

Cayman Islands (EK99) – Bill, NZ5N, will be active from the Cayman
Islands as ZF2EM on SO-50 May 20 – May 25, 2015. This is primarily an
EME DXpedition and they will only be on SO-50 passes when the moon is
not up.

Guernsey (IN89) – Peter Goodhall, 2E0SQL, will be active from
Guernsey (IN89) as 2U0SQL/P July 22 – July 28, 2015. He will likely
be using an FT-817 as the uplink transmitter and a FUNcube Dongle
with a laptop as the downlink receiver with an Arrow Antenna.
Operation may be sporadic and/or by sked only as the primary purpose
of the trip is for the IOTA contest.

Please submit any additions or corrections to n8hm at arrl.net

Satellite Schedule Notes

AO-73 (FUNcube-1) – Currently in full time transponder mode until
the evening of April 26, 2015 (UK time).

AO-7 – Currently operating in Mode B while in sunlight. As of April
5, 2015, the satellite appears to be losing power upon entering
eclipse several times per day and, by design, resets into Mode B when
it powers up. Since it is entering eclipse several times per day, the
24 hour timer that switches the satellite into Mode A is reset and
never has the opportunity to switch the satellite to Mode A. Note
that in the past, the satellite has unexpectedly switched modes. This
has often been observed to coincide with the presence of extremely
strong signals in the passband. Pleae limit your uplink power to no
more than 100 watts ERP.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention – Third call for volunteers

The Dayton Hamvention is less than four weeks away!

Last year, we had 52 people assist with the AMSAT booth at Dayton.
We’ve had a good response so far to our call for volunteers, but we
could really use another 10-15 people.

The interaction with AMSAT members, satellite operators, designers,
and builders makes the whole experience a lot of fun. Meet or renew
acquaintances, exchange operating tips, and find out what antennas,
software and equipment other AMSAT members use. We currently expect
all of the AMSAT senior officers and 5 of the 7 board members to be
there too.

The 2015 Hamvention is May 15-17. Would you consider helping AMSAT
at Dayton this year?

If you’re an experienced operator, great! We can use you and your
experience.

If you’ve never operated a satellite before, but want to learn more,
that’s OK. We can use your help too.

Whether you’re available for only a couple of hours or if you can
spend the entire weekend with us, your help would be greatly
appreciated.

Please send an e-mail to Steve, n9ip@amsat.org if you can help.
Thank you!

[ANS thanks Steve, N9IP, Dayton Team Leader, for the above
information]
———————————————————————
Design The Next AMSAT Satellite! – Submission Deadline May 30

At the 2014 AMSAT Space Symposium AMSAT Vice President – Engineering
Jerry Buxton announced the plan for the next generation of AMSAT
satellites. “The door is open for everyone, to submit their ideas.
AMSAT Engineering has a long term strategy and this is the first
step.”

The Engineering long term strategy includes the following goals

* Advancement of amateur radio satellite technical and communications
skills
* Enhance international goodwill
* Grow and sustain a skilled pool of amateur radio satellite engineers
* Establish and maintain partnerships with educational institutions
* Develop a means to use hardware common to all opportunities

With respect to the last goal Jerry said “Within the bounds of the
type of satellite it takes to achieve any of the various orbit
opportunities, let’s consider in those plans the possibility of
developing a platform that can suit any and all orbits. Perhaps a
modular CubeSat, using a common bus as we did in Fox-1, which gives
great flexibility in building and flying different sizes and
configurations of CubeSats with simple common-design hardware
changes.”

Submissions should be thorough and contain the following
information. The purpose of the proposal is not just in suggesting
an idea; being an all-volunteer team AMSAT needs your help in
carrying out the idea.

Design
Implementation – CubeSat platform
Estimated timeline
Cost – volunteer resources, commercial (COTS) units
Launch – how does it get to orbit
Strategy – how it fits into AMSAT’s Engineering long term strategy
As mentioned above the idea should be based on the CubeSat platform.
This is the standard through which we will look for launches in the
foreseeable future.

In considering your proposal, Jerry encourages you to contact him,
(n0jy@amsat.org using Subject: Design the Next AMSAT Satelleite), for
more details on the criteria.

A guidebook to the criteria is now available for download at

http://tinyurl.com/ANS032-SatelliteGuide.

In particular, if you plan to include a university as a partner to
provide experiments or other support and you are not representing
that university, please contact Jerry for assistance in working with
our existing partners or establishing a new partnership.

“Being amateur radio operators, it is easy for us to fall into a
particular trap because of our history of communicating with other
amateurs throughout the world” says Jerry. “Specifically, most people
who are not already involved in the world of satellite technology are
unaware of or simply overlook the provisions of the current ITAR and
soon to be EAR export rules particularly with regard to deemed
exports which requires governmental permission to discuss satellite
projects with foreign nationals.”

While all amateurs are invited to submit ideas, U.S. amateurs must
take particular care of they choose to become involved in a
collaboration which includes individuals from other countries. It is
permissible to receive ideas and proposals from outside the U.S., but
it is not permitted for U.S. Persons to export or share design ideas
with other countries unless they have taken the proper steps to
insure compliance with ITAR and deemed export rules.

Additionally, those wishing to work on proposals should use care in
presenting themselves in their contacts. While the goal is for AMSAT
to build and launch the satellite, it is not an AMSAT project until
it is accepted by the AMSAT Board of Directors. It is acceptable to
represent yourself as members of a project team that plans to submit
a proposal to AMSAT for a future satellite project, as the AMSAT name
is well known.

“It is not our intention that ideas be submitted to AMSAT-NA which
would be more appropriately handled by an AMSAT organization in a
country where AMSAT is established. AMSAT-NA is seeking ideas from
amateurs in North America and will certainly consider ideas from
amateurs in countries which do not have an established AMSAT
organization or relationships with an existing AMSAT organization.”

The deadline for submissions is May 30, 2015. After the submission
date the ideas will be screened for completeness and then reviewed by
a board consisting of the AMSAT Engineering Team, AMSAT Senior
Officer and Board of Directors representatives, and aerospace
industry members. The review board may modify or consolidate ideas
and will consider which meet the criteria to become a project based
on feasibility, cost, and the ability to bring value to the amateur
satellite community. The review process is expected to be completed
in September 2015.

For those ideas selected to become a project which satisfy the
requirements for an ELaNa launch, the idea authors will be asked to
work with the AMSAT Engineering Team on an ELaNa proposal.

The Engineering Team will then work on the details of execution for
the selected project(s) and present a proposal to the AMSAT Board of
Directors in October 2015 for final approval to begin work. Once
approved, any ELaNa proposals will be submitted in November 2015 and
the project(s) will move forward.

Now is the time for YOU to begin working on the next AMSAT satellite!

[ANS thanks AMSAT Engineering for the above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between East Coast Chapter Tuskegee
Airmen, Inc., Youth In Aviation Program (ECCTAI YIAP) and Oxon Hill
High School, Oxon Hill, Maryland, USA and Astronaut Samantha
Cristoforetti IZØUDF using Callsign NAISS. The contact began 2015-04-
24 16:41:27 UTC and lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was
direct via K6DUE. ARISS Mentor was KA3HDO.

Contact Audience was about 180-190
VIPs included two documented original Tuskegee Airmen and one WWII
Navy Veteran. Over a dozen from the East Coast Chapter Tuskegee
Airmen organization attended and wore Red Jackets commemorating the
Tuskegee Airmen.

The school live-streamed the event on their school newspaper
website, and recorded 100+ views the day of the event. Indirect
participants is confirmed and expected to increase when more are
confirmed. The contact was streamed into all the Price Georges
County, Maryland Schools.

News organizations: WUSA9 (TV), WRC News4 (TV), Andrews
Gazette(Newspaper), CTV Prince George’s County News (TV-Local Cable),
Prince George’s County Public Schools Communication Office.
12 questions were asked and 11 were answered. The last question was
barely discernable in the static.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Double School Contact
Sol Plaatje Primary School, Mahikeng, South Africa. and
South Africa, and Scuola Secondaria di I Grado, Caprino Bergamasco,
Italy
The contact will be a telebridge via IK1SLD
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be IRØISS
The scheduled astronaut is Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF
Contact is a go for: Sat 2015-05-02 14:34:27 UTC

School Information

Scuola Secondaria di I Grado:

Caprino Bergamasco and its school are located atop of hills in
between Bergamo and Lecco region. The school facility, recently
built, serve the small community of 3000 people, it has pupils from
age 3 to 14. Students from 11 to 14 have been involved in the ARISS
activity, belonging to classes 1E, 2E, 2F and 3E.

Sol Plaatje Primary School:

It is a co-ed school having Gr.0-Gr.7. There are 1216 learners in
the school, planet Earth and beyond is part of the curriculum and as
a school they try to develop the learner’s knowledge about space
bodies and inculcate a love for the subject within the learners.

Sol Plaatje Primary School participated on at the 2014 SAASTA
Astronomy Quiz with a team – made by Ebenitha Esterhuizen,
Kgotlholela Seagisa, Oratile Selatlhedi and Orefile Morule, prepared
by the teacher Ms Micalla Lucas – and resulted the best among more
than 1.700 schools.

Upcoming Russian Contacts

Ryazan, Russia, direct via TBD
Contact is a go for Thu 2015-05-07 08:30 UTC
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS
The scheduled astronaut is Mikhail Korniyenko RN3BF

Kursk, Russia, WWII veterans, direct via TBD
Contact is a go for Sat 2015-05-09 08:20 UTC
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS
The scheduled astronaut is Gennady Padalka RN3DT

From 2015-05-11 to 2015-06-14, there will be no US Operational
Segment (USOS) hams on board ISS. So any schools contacts during
this period will be conducted by the ARISS Russia team.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

ARISS passes along our condolences to the families of recent silent
keys:
Max IW1CNF who helped with many of the ARISS Italian telebridge
contacts.
Clive G3CWV who was very active in AMSAT

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N information]
———————————————————————
Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Videos of the presentations from The 2015 CubeSat Workshop held
April 1 at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) are now
available on YouTube.
http://tinyurl.com/ANS116-CubesatVideos

The presentation schedule and slide PDF’s are at
http://www.acser.unsw.edu.au/events/cubesat2015.html

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

+ March/April AMSAT Journal – in the Mail
Members began receiving their AMSAT Journals in the mail this
week. Keep an eye out for yours.
Membership in AMSAT is required to receive the Journal.
Annual membership is $44.00,
Join today! http://tinyurl.com/ANS116-JoinAMSAT
———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-116.01
SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-116.01
ANS-116 AMSAT News Service Special Bulletin

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 116.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
April 25, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-116.01

AMSAT-NA Opportunity for Rideshare to Geostationary Orbit

AMSAT is excited to announce that we have accepted an opportunity to
participate in a potential rideshare as a hosted payload on a
geostationary satellite planned for launch in 2017. An amateur radio
payload, operating in the Amateur Satellite Service, will fly on a
spacecraft which Millennium Space Systems (MSS) of El Segundo, CA is
contracted to design, launch, and operate for the US government based
on their Aquila M8 Series Satellite Structure.

A meeting to discuss this potential rideshare took place on April 13
at Millennium Space Systems that included Dr. Bob McGwier, N4HY;
Franklin Antonio, N6NKF, co-founder of Qualcomm; Jerry Buxton, N0JY,
AMSAT Vice President of Engineering and member of the board for AMSAT-
NA; Dr. Tom Clark, K3IO, Director and President Emeritus of AMSAT-NA;
Phil Karn, KA9Q; and Michelle Thompson, W5NYV.

Hosting the meeting for MSS were Stan Dubyn as founder and chairman
of MSS, Vince Deno as president of MSS, Jeff Ward, K8KA, of MSS as VP
for Product Development, formerly with SSTL and University of Surrey
Space Center, and Ryan Lawrence of MSS as Project Manager on the
spacecraft mission. Attending by telephone were Dr. Jonathan Black,
Associate Research Director of Hume Center for Aerospace Systems and
Associate Professor of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering and Dr.
Michael Parker, KT7D, founder of RINCON Research Corp.

Following the meeting, Dr. Bob McGwier, N4HY, Director of Research
at the Hume Center for National Security and Technology of Virginia
Tech, and former director and former VP Engineering of AMSAT,
described this as an opportunity to go forward with “AMSAT-Eagle”
which, in the 2006-2008 timeframe, evolved into a microwave payload
to be flown to geostationary orbit as a hosted payload. It would have
provided digital communications to small terminals on the ground and
a linear bent pipe transponder had it flown. This failed to go
forward in part due to lack of an affordable flight opportunity.

McGwier outlined the next steps toward developing this mission:

1) To organize an effort at Virginia Tech to make a firm proposal
to MSS and its US government sponsor, and organize an effort
to raise sufficient funds to pay for development of the mission.

2) Enable Dr. Jonathan Black to lead the construction project at
Virginia Tech in the Space@VT Center. Sonya Rowe, KK4NLO, Project
Manager at the Hume Center will be the project manager.

3) Work for development of a low-cost microwave ground station for
amateur radio still needs to be determined.

4) Dr. Michael Parker, KT7D, will solicit the cooperation of the
Rincon Research Corp. for development of the software radio
technology for this payload.

The AMSAT Board of Directors has accepted the invitation to
participate in this potential rideshare payload opportunity. AMSAT
expects to be involved in the development of the ground station and
the payload RF development, and will serve as the amateur radio
(hosted) payload operator once the satellite has been launched.

McGwier summarized, “The launch is currently scheduled for 2017 and
the payload must be delivered for testing and integration by Spring
of 2016. It is an ambitious schedule and all involved will have to
gain and maintain a serious level of commitment to that which they
agree to undertake.” AMSAT President, Barry Baines, WD4ASW, said,
“The AMSAT leadership is excited to fly a Phase-IV geostationary
amateur satellite payload. This is an evolving development as we
collaborate with the VT Hume Center with a project that provides
technical challenges to create a new amateur radio capability in
space that will provide a variety of benefits not only for amateurs
but also for emergency communications and STEM educational outreach.”

The transponder is expected to support a wide range of voice,
digital, and experimental advanced communications technologies. A
decision is expected soon specifying the microwave uplink and
downlink bands.

Additional information on the Aquila M8 Series Satellite can be viewed
on-line:
http://www.millennium-space.com/
http://www.millennium-space.com/platforms#aquila

AMSAT has posted a photo of the GEO opportunity team with the
Millennium Aquila satellite at: http://www.amsat.org.

[ANS thanks Bob McGwier, N4HY and AMSAT-NA for the above information]

/EX

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-109

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Fox-1C and Fox-1D Include L-Band Uplink; Fox-1E Linear Transponder Announced
* Immediate Volunteer Opening at AMSAT: Cubesat Thermal Engineering
* AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention — Second call for volunteers
* “GB4MBC” – Special Event Station – Cancelled
* Clive Wallis – G3CWV – SK
* Cayman Island on Satellites May 20-25
* NASA Cube Quest Challenge

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-109.01
ANS-109 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 109.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
April 19, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-109.01

Fox-1C and Fox-1D Include L-Band Uplink; Fox-1E Linear Transponder Announced

AMSAT Vice President – Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, announced plans to
incorporate an L band receiver in Fox-1C and Fox-1D. The addition will allow
ground commanded selection of the U/v (normal Fox-1 bands) or the new L/v
1.2 GHz (23 cm) mode. Both bands will operate as FM single channel.

Rather than adding a complete new receiver, the L band “Project Downshifter”
will convert the received L band signal down to the Fox-1 uplink frequency
and feed it to the regular UHF receiver on the Fox-1 satellite. The design
will not require an additional antenna on the satellite because the existing
UHF antenna will work for L band receive as well.

In concert with the development of the satellite segment, a new group of
volunteers is working on a companion uplink station to convert UHF to the L
band uplink frequencies:

+ Bruce Herrick, WW1M
+ Dan Hubert, VE9DAN
+ Elizabeth Schenk, KC1AXX
+ Dave Smith, W6TE
+ Alfred Watts, AF5VH

The team is planning to have an affordable L band uplink ground station
available to amateurs by the time Fox-1C is on orbit.

In further news, Jerry announced the plan to construct a Fox-1E “Evolution”
variation of the Fox-1 series which will carry a Mode J linear transponder.
The transponder is planned to be 30 kHz wide and will also include a 1200
bps BPSK telemetry beacon. The purpose of the project is to test a design for a
linear transponder that could be made available to CubeSat builders as a
secondary, or even primary radio payload thus bringing more opportunities for
amateur radio in space as well as offering AMSAT’s proven communications skills
as a telemetry option.

AMSAT has been approached for a launch opportunity for Fox-1E in 2016, but
launch details can not be shared at this time.

Jerry concluded, “It is important that we find additional resources to help
the Fox-1 Team with these new endeavors. We are looking for volunteers who
have solid RF building and testing experience to work on both the
downshifter and the transponder prototyping and construction.” If you would
like to help and be a part of the success of Fox-1C/D and Fox-1E, please
contact Jerry through the AMSAT Engineering volunteer form page on-line at:
http://ww2.amsat.org/?page_id=1121.

[ANS thanks AMSAT Vice President – Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, for the
above information]

———————————————————————

Immediate Volunteer Opening at AMSAT: Cubesat Thermal Engineering

AMSAT Vice President – Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, says he has an
immediate need for a volunteer who is experienced in thermal engineering.
Opportunities include upcoming AMSAT CubeSats up to 6U in LEO and HEO, and
larger spacecraft up to 150 kg.

Jerry says Sinda, Thermica, and Patran software experience would be helpful.

If you would like to help and be a part of the success of Fox-1C/D and
Fox-1E, please contact Jerry through the AMSAT Engineering volunteer form
page on-line at:
http://ww2.amsat.org/?page_id=1121.

[ANS thanks AMSAT Vice President – Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, for the
above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention — Second call for volunteers

The Dayton Hamvention is less than five weeks away!

It is time to be creating your shopping list and making your travel plans.
If you can stay for more than a day and you want to stay at the AMSAT
hotel, contact Martha ASAP.

Last year, we had 52 people assist with the AMSAT booth at Dayton. We’ve
had a good response so far to our call for volunteers, but we could really
use another 10-15 people.

The interaction with AMSAT members, satellite operators, designers, and
builders makes the whole experience a lot of fun.  Meet or renew
acquaintances, exchange operating tips, and find out what antennas,
software and equipment other AMSAT members use.   We currently expect all
of the AMSAT senior officers and 5 of the 7 board members to be there too.

The 2015 Hamvention is May 15-17.  Would you consider helping AMSAT at
Dayton this year?

If you’re an experienced operator, great!  We can use you and your
experience.

If you’ve never operated a satellite before, but want to learn more,
that’s OK.  We can use your help too.

Whether you’re available for only a couple of hours or if you can spend
the entire weekend with us, your help would be greatly appreciated.

Please send an e-mail to Steve, n9ip@amsat.org if you can help. Thank you!

[ANS thanks Steve, N9IP, Dayton Team Leader, for the above information]

———————————————————————

“GB4MBC” – Special Event Station – Cancelled

With respect to the planned activation of the Special Event Station –
“GB4MBC” on HF and satellite during 24th -27th April 2015 -Location: ”
Flatholm  Island”   EU124. Due to circumstances beyond our control ,”Barry
Amateur Radio Society” South Wales, regrets that the visit and activation
has been cancelled.

An attempt for contacts from our mainland station with its Marconi
special call GB0MDI -Locator IO81JJ

[ANS thanks Ken, GW1FKY, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Clive Wallis – G3CWV – SK

From Jim Heck, G3WGM, Hon Sec AMSAT-UK

It is with great sadness that I have to inform you that I have just learnt of
the passing of our dear friend Clive Wallis, G3CWV on 27th March 2015.

Clive has been a very staunch supporter of AMSAT from the very early days. Many
will recall his intense interest and loyalty in following UOSAT-2/UO-11. He
maintained a very comprehensive web site with details of the spacecraft’s
activities. He wrote many articles for Oscar News about his activities. He
attended many AMSAT-UK Colloquia.

For 17 years between 1996 and 2013 Clive produced monthly reports on OSCAR-11
(UoSAT-2).
The report archive is at http://www.g3cwv.co.uk/newsarch.htm

Clive’s OSCAR-11 page http://www.g3cwv.co.uk/oscar11.htm

In 1993 Clive Wallis G3CWV took over distribution of satellite related BBC
software
http://amsat-uk.org/2011/12/11/bbc-micro-and-amsat-uk-software-library/

He was awarded the Louis Varney cup for 2015 by the RSGB, and although he knew
of the award before his passing, the formal presentation is not until 25 April.

His funeral is to be held on Tue 22 April 2015 at 3.00pm at Christchurch,
Bedford Road, Hitchin, Herts, UK. I am sure that his family would appreciate the
presence of any AMSAT members who are able to be there.

We send our condolences to his widow, Janet.

RIP, Clive.

73s
Jim Heck G3WGM
Hon Sec AMSAT-UK

[ANS thanks Jim Heck, G3WGM, Hon Sec AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Cayman Island on Satellites May 20-25

ZF2, CAYMAN ISLANDS. Operators Pete/N8PR and Bill/NZ5N will be active as
ZF2EM from the Cayman Islands between May 20-25th. Main activity will be
focused on 2 meter EME, but with some HF SSB and maybe JT65HF. They will
also have 2m/440 and an Elk antenna for some possible FM satellite QSOs
if the passes are at times when the moon is not up. QSL via N8PR.

[ANS thanks Ohio/Penn DX Bulletin #1210 for the above information]

———————————————————————

NASA Cube Quest Challenge

The Cube Quest Challenge, sponsored by NASA’s Space Technology Mission
Directorate Centennial Challenge Program, offers a total of $5 million to teams
that meet the challenge objectives of designing, building and delivering flight-
qualified, small satellites capable of advanced operations near and beyond the
moon.

1) You are cordially invited to subscribe to the official, new, Cube Quest
Challenge mailing list!
The Cube Quest mailing list will:
* Broadcast official announcements regarding the Challenge
* Enable list members to post messages, share ideas, collaborate, and
offer Challenge-related services
* Be monitored by Cube Quest to approve list members and keep posts
on-topic

To subscribe, visit:
https://lists.nasa.gov/mailman/listinfo/cube-quest-challenge  and follow
the instructions.

2) Revised Operations and Rules and other documents have recently been
posted to the Cube Quest web pages.
To keep up-to-date, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/cubequest/details/ and
keep your eyes on the News and Updates announcements.  (News and Updates
will also be posted to the Cube Quest mailing list.)

3) Cube Quest judges Dr. David Klumpar and Bruce Yost will be attending
the April 22-24 CubeSat Developers Workshop at Cal Poly, so be sure to say
“hi”.

4) Less than 108 days before the first Cube Quest Ground Tournament!
There’s still time to register your team. Download the official Operations
and Rules document, then visit the http://www.nasa.gov/cubequest/details/
“how to enter” link to register your team.

[ANS thanks Jim Cockrell for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-102

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

[Ed. note – Apologies for the delay in the distribution of the ANS bulletins
this week. Our regular editor is dealing with a family emergency.]

In this edition:

* TAPR/AMSAT Dinner Featured Speaker at Dayton
* AMSAT Hotel Room Reservations for Dayton Hamvention
* AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention — Call for volunteers
* AMSAT Awards Update
* Updates to Format in AMSAT Weekly Keplerian Elements Distribution
* AMSAT on Newsline Video Update

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-102.01
ANS-095 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 095.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE April 12, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-102.01

———————————————————————

TAPR/AMSAT Dinner Featured Speaker at Dayton

The ninth annual TAPR/AMSAT Banquet will be held on Friday night, May 15, at
1830 EDT. This dinner is always a highlight of the AMSAT (Radio Amateur
Satellite Corp.) and TAPR (Tucson Amateur Packet Radio) activities during
the Dayton Hamvention.

This year’s speaker will be Michael Ossmann, AD0NR, “Adventures of a Hacker
Turned Ham”. Michael Ossmann, AD0NR, grew up as a computer nerd embracing
the hacker ethos. Eventually Michael became very interested in the security
of wireless systems such as remote keyless entry, garage door openers,
Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth. He designed Ubertooth One, a Bluetooth sniffer that
was successfully funded on Kickstarter. Not one to rest, Michael later
designed and successfully funded HackRF One, an open source SDR platform
that attracted the attention of the amateur radio community. Michael will
talk about his unique perspective on the community as an outsider looking
in, why he resisted getting a license for years, and why he finally decided
to join. Michael will also share his thoughts on what it means to be a
hacker, what it means to be a ham, and what amateur radio may look like in
the decades to come.

Tickets ($35 each) must be purchased online in advance on the AMSAT website
at www.amsat.org through the AMSAT Store tab. Tickets will not be sold at
the Hamvention or at the door. Tickets purchased online may be collected at
the AMSAT booth (433-435, 444-446). The Banquet will take place at the
Kohler Presidential Banquet Center, 4572 Presidential Way, Kettering, OH
45429 (just south of Dayton). The cash bar will open at 1830 EDT, with the
dinner commencing around 1900 EDT.

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Hamvention Posse for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Hotel Room Reservations for Dayton Hamvention

Once again, this year, as in previous years AMSAT has reserved a block of
rooms for the Dayton Hamvention at the Country Inn & Suites in Fairborn,
Ohio. The cost is $109 per night. The cutoff date for reservations is April
12.

First priority will be given to AMSAT members assisting with the booth
operations, satellite operating demonstrations, and the AMSAT Forum
presentations. Call Martha at the AMSAT office at 301-822-4376 to give her
your arrival/departure dates and your credit card information.

[ANS thanks Martha at the AMSAT Office for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention — Call for volunteers

Last year, we had 52 people assist with the AMSAT booth at the Dayton.  It
was the efforts of those volunteers that made the 2014 Dayton Hamvention a
success for AMSAT.

The interaction with AMSAT members, satellite operators, designers, and
builders makes the whole experience a lot of fun.

The 2015 Hamvention is May 15-17.  Would you consider helping AMSAT at
Dayton this year?

Whether you’re available for only a couple of hours or if you can spend the
entire weekend with us, your help would be greatly appreciated.

Please send an e-mail to Steve, n9ip at amsat.org if you can help.

[ANS thanks AMSAT’s Hamvention Chairman Steve Belter, N9IP for the above
information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Awards Update

Here are the awards that have been submitted thus far in 2015.

Here are our latest inductions into some of the AMSAT awards community.

The following have entered into the Satellite Communicators Club for
making their first satellite QSO.

Nicolas Romero, KG5BON
Steve Kristoff, AI9IN
Hope Lea, KM4IPF
Faith Hannah Lea, WA4BBC
Zechariah Lea, WX4TVJ

To see all the awards visit http://www.amsat.org or
http://www.amsatnet.com/awards.html

[ANS thanks Bruce Paige, KK5DO, AMSAT Director Contests and Awards, for the
above information]

———————————————————————

Updates to Format in AMSAT Weekly Keplerian Elements Distribution

The AMSAT verbose format will no longer be distributed by AMSAT email. This
is the element set that looks like the following:

Satellite: AO-07
Catalog number: 07530
Epoch time:      15021.49149419
Element set:     174
Inclination:      101.5028 deg
RA of node:       001.3581 deg
Eccentricity:    0.0011670
Arg of perigee:   228.2064 deg
Mean anomaly:     245.5090 deg
Mean motion:   12.53610988 rev/day
Decay rate:       -1.6e-07 rev/day^2
Epoch rev:           83887
Checksum:              279

Please note that the following NASA 2-line (TLE) format will continue
to be sent. The NASA 2-line TLE) format looks like this:

AO-07
1 07530U 74089B   15021.49149419 -.00000016  00000-0  17235-3 0  1747
2 07530 101.5028 001.3581 0011670 228.2064 245.5090 12.53610988838873

On January 22, 2015 I requested comments on discontinuing the AMSAT
verbose format and the comments that I have received to date indicate
that very few people would be affected by this change. The AMSAT
verbose format has out lived its usefulness. Those that are affected
by this change are considering work-arounds to allow them to use the
NASA 2-line (TLE) format. Note that most satellite tracking programs
readily accept the NASA 2-line (TLE) format if the correct upload
options are chosen.

The NASA 2-line elements will continue being sent each week as they
are now. In effect, the weekly email that you now receive will
consist only of one email entitled orbYYDDD.2l.amsat (for example).
The YY in the email title is the year (15 for 2015) and DDD is the
Julian day of the year (022 for January 22nd).

The email entitled orbYYDDD.amsat (for example) will NOT be sent.

One more time, the weekly NASA 2-line element (NASA TLE) format email
will continue to be sent each week as usual.

Joe Fitzgerald notes that another source of current Keplerian 2-line
data (TLE) is now available. The following URL has current data for
the AMSAT satellite list including the ISS and is updated at least
daily using the latest ISS elements from Johnson Spaceflight Center.

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ftp/keps/current/nasabare.txt

New satellites are added as soon as possible – so there is no need
to wait for the Thursday bulletin if you need an update right now.

[ANS thank Ray Hoad, WA5QGD, AMSAT Keeper of the Keps, for the above
information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT on Newsline Video Update

AMSAT gets a nice mention in the Amateur Radio Newsline video report this
week:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=HXBAsjdt0bA

At about the 3 minute point Newsline reports on our ANS bulletin about the
new 2015 updated “Getting Started” book will be released at Dayton.

[ANS thanks the Amateur Radio Newsline for the above information

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
JoAnne Maenpaa, K9JKM
k9jkm@amsat.org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-095

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT Plans Dayton Rollout for 2015 “Getting Started” Satellite Book
* TAPR/AMSAT Joint Hamvention Banquet Will be on May 15
* March/April Edition of the AMSAT Journal Sent to Printers
* LibreCube Open Source CubeSat Projects
* AMSAT-SM Announces Committee for 2015-2016
* ISS Slow Scan TV Expected Weekend of April 11
* GRACE mission P-PODs including Fox-1A were integrated in the NPSCuL
* Wisconsin Balloon Launch Includes 2M Voice Beacon
* Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 9 to the
International Space Station
* 21st Century Teacher Academy
* US ARISS School Proposal Window Closes in 10 Days
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over
SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-095.01
ANS-095 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 095.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE April 5, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-095.01
AMSAT Plans Dayton Rollout for 2015 “Getting Started” Satellite Book

Gould Smith’s book, “Getting Started With Amateur Satellites”, is
being updated to tell you all about how you can get ready to operate
through the Fox-1 satellites launching later this year. Additional
chapters in the book tell you about tracking software, orbital
mechanics, antennas, radios, Doppler tuning, and operating
techniques. Chapters are also being added to tell you about the new
satellites soon becoming available for amateur radio.

Going beyond brief descriptions in hamfest flyers, this book will
provide a complete reference for new satellite users to assemble a
basic station and to make your first satellite contacts. Also this
book you will teach you how to incrementally upgrade your initial FM
satellite station, time and budget permitting, to include automated
tracking as well as operating through the CW/SSB linear passband
satellites.

A companion Fox-1A reference sheet is also being planned for release
at Dayton. This will be made available for AMSAT’s FieldOps team for
distribution at hamfests and satellite operating demonstrations.

Watch for the 2015 “Getting Started With Amateur Satellites” book
and reference sheet at the AMSAT booth at the Dayton Hamvention. The
book will also be available in the AMSAT Store shortly after Dayton:
http://store.amsat.org/catalog/

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Office for the above information]
———————————————————————
TAPR/AMSAT Joint Hamvention Banquet Will be on May 15

Join us at the Dayton Hamvention this year for the TAPR/AMSAT
Banquet on Friday evening, May 15. Doors open at 1830 for a cash bar,
with buffet dinner served at 1900.

Reservations must be made in advance in the AMSAT Store:
http://store.amsat.org/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=88 with
the cost of $35 per person. Tickets will not be sold at Dayton.
Tickets purchased online may be picked up at the AMSAT booth (433-
435, 444-446). Orders must be placed by 1800 EDT, Tuesday, May 12th.
No exceptions.

Come hungry and loosen your belt a notch. The dinner menu includes:

+ Choice of entree:
o Prime Rib of Beef
o Chicken Piccata with Lemon Caper Sauce
o Medallions of Grilled Pork Tenderloin
+ Fresh Mashed Potatoes
+ Wild Rice Pilaf with Pecans and Apricots
+ Fresh Garden Tossed Salad
+ Rolls
+ Assorted Cakes and Cheesecakes
+ Coffee and Ice Tea
+ There will be a cash bar serving beer, wine, and mixed drinks.

Watch for the upcoming announcement of this year’s after dinner
speaker.

The dinner will be held at:
Jefferson Room
The Kohler Presidential Banquet Center
4548 Presidential Way
Kettering, OH 45429

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Dayton Hamvention Posse for the above
information]
———————————————————————
March/April Edition of the AMSAT Journal Sent to Printers

March/April edition of the AMSAT Journal was sent to the printers
March 31. Editor JoAnne Maenpaa, K9JKM, Would like to thank Bernhard,
VA6BMJ; Douglas, KA2UPW/5; James, K3JPH; and Joe, KB6IGK, for their
help on getting this issue ready.

Contents include
+ AMSAT Announcements – Board of Directors Nominations Notice
+ Apogee View
by Barry Baines, WD4ASW
+ Amateur Satellites at Anchorage Engineer’s Week
by Craig Bledsoe. KL4E
+ Pairing SDR dongles with smaller Windows 8.1 tablets
by Patrick Stoddard WD9EWK
+ The Gizmo Revisited
by Art Payne VE3NGF
+ AMSAT Field Day
+ The Satellite Attitude Manipulating System (SAMS) Prototype
by Mark Spencer WA8SME
+ AMSAT Nets
by Keith Pugh W5IU
+ IARU: 29 MHz Uplinks
by Ray Soifer W2RS
+ AMSAT Engineering Update
by Jerry Buxton NØJY
+ ARISS SSTV Results
+ AMSAT at the HamCation
+ AMSAT and University of Iowa Partner on Scientific Payload
for Fox-1D
+ Orbital Debrief for March/April 2015
by Paul Stoetzer N8HM
+ Minutes of the 2014 AMSAT-NA Board of Directors Meeting

[ANS thanks JoAnne K9JKM for the above information]
———————————————————————
LibreCube Open Source CubeSat Projects

Those of you interested in open source may want to have a look at
www.librecube.net where you will find a number of common CubeSat
products available for you.

You may freely modify, produce, improve, and share them. Please read
the included license files for details.

They are hosted by LibreCube, a non-profit initiative that has the
objective to promote open source CubeSat design and foster
collaboration among the CubeSat community.

Your Feedback is most welcome.

[ANS thanks LibreCube and the CubeSat mailing list for the above
information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT-SM Announces Committee for 2015-2016

AMSAT-SM Committee for 2015-2016 has been announced

Chairman Hakan – SM7WSJ
Secretary Lars – SM0TGU
Treasurer Kim – SM1TDX.

At the moment AMSAT-SM has 148 members but only a few are active via
satellite. But, we are still alive and we are very active with news
on our website and Twitter.

AMSAT-SM is the Swedish section of AMSAT with aprox 150 members
(2015). One of our objectives is to inform Swedish hams about the fun
with amateur satellites! Not many SM hams are active via satellite at
the moment. With the help from our swedish webpage and HF-net we hope
that more swedish hams should be using amateur satellites.
The AMSAT-SM annual meeting is held every spring. We run a HF-net on
80 meters every Sunday with lots of news about satellites and space.

AMSAT-SM website
http://www.amsat.se/

English language website
http://www.amsat.se/english-info/

AMSAT-SM is using the Internet homepage for members information and
news. You can find articles, news, links and lots of more information
about satellites. The large main page is only in Swedish because
there are allready a lot of good sites about amateur satellites in
english. We provide the following information:

FAQ and technical page
New amateur satellites update
Latest telemetry from several microsats
A news service on the homepage called e-Journal
Active on Twitter, Facebook and Youtube. See links on right frame on
webpage.

AMSAT-SM has a mailing list (just like the AMSAT-BB list) that was
started in 1998. Most of the mail are in swedish, but you are welcome
to subscribe.
Send an e-mail to: amsat-sm-subscribe@yahoogroups.co.uk

Contact: You can reach AMSAT-SM at:

AMSAT-SM
c/o Lars Thunberg
Revirvägen 17
192 73 Sollentuna
Sweden

E-mail:
info at amsat.se

English website
http://www.amsat.se/english-info/

[ANS thanks Lars Thunberg SM0TGU and AMSAT-SM for the above
information]
———————————————————————
ISS Slow Scan TV Expected Weekend of April 11

In commemoration of the 54th anniversary of the first human
spaceflight by Yuri Gagarin which took place on April 12, 1961, the
Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) announced that SSTV activity
will take place from the ISS. As with similar to events this past
winter the images can be captured on 145.800 MHz FM using SSTV mode
PD180.

Those capturing images are encouraged to upload them to
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/submit.php
Uploaded images may be viewed at
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/

Please be advised that situational demands on crew time could result
in postponement or cancellation of any ARISS activity. Please pay
attention to the possibility of any change in scheduling.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]
———————————————————————
GRACE mission P-PODs including Fox-1A were integrated in the NPSCuL

UPDATE – The P-PODs were delivered to Naval Postgraduate School this
week and have been integrated in the NPSCuL.

The video linked below was provided to all of the GRACE mission
CubeSat teams by Justin Foley of Cal Poly.

Justin says “A few years back we put together a video that outlines
the process we go through to get CubeSats on the Atlas V. This video
follows the payload we put on NROL-36, aka OUTSat, which launched
from VAFB and carried 11 cubes. The process is very similar to what
your satellites are going through now.”

Photos of the P-POD integration in the Cal Poly clean room, which is
where this video begins the story, can be viewed at
http://www.amsat.org/. The last two CubeSats were integrated in their
P-POD March 26. All of the P-PODs then head up to the Naval
Postgraduate School next week for integration in the NPSCuL and
acceptance testing, and then be sent on to Vandenberg (cue video) –

[ANS Thanks to Justin D. Foley for the YouTube video link and AMSAT
for the above information]
———————————————————————
Wisconsin Balloon Launch Includes 2M Voice Beacon

Wisconsin HAB is doing our second launch, which is participating as
part of the Global Balloon Space Challenge.

Date: 4/18/2015
Time: 8:00 AM CDT Setup, 9:00 AM CDT Launch

If you want to see it in person, EVERYONE is welcome to stop out and
watch. It’s at a park so there’s lots of room. Join us!

Highland Village Park, located at 755 N Park St, Highland, WI 53543
(about 1 hour West of Madison, WI)

If you can’t make it in-person, watch it LIVE on YouTube. That’s
right, we will be streaming LIVE on YouTube @

If you’re into amateur radio, you can monitor our chase & tracking
at FM38 http://www.fm38.org/tiki-index.php.
Additionally, we will be transmitting a voice beacon on 146.430 MHz
and using Simplex @ 146.550 Mhz during the recovery effort.

If you are a visual person and want to follow the balloon via Google
Maps,
you can visit http://aprs.fi/.

Additionally, we will be updating Facebook and tweeting @WisconsinHAB
https://twitter.com/WisconsinHAB/

[ANS thanks Wisconsin High Altitude Ballooning and the
Balloon_Sked at yahoogroups.com mailing list for the above
information]
———————————————————————
Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 9 to the
International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the
Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with
NanoRacks LLC, announce an authentic science, technology, engineering
and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the
U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight
opportunity, Mission 9 to the International Space Station, or ISS,
gives students across a community the ability to design and propose
real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the ISS. This
opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program,
or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity
research minilaboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity
experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space
station in spring 2016 and return it to Earth. An experiment design
competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students —
allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for
their community’s reserved minilab. Content resources for teachers
and students support foundational instruction on science in
microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming
leverages the experiment design competition to engage the community,
embracing a learning community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college.
Informal education groups and organizations are also encouraged to
participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no
later than April 30, 2015. The National Center for Earth and Space
Science Education is available to help interested communities in the
U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 9 to
International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at
http://tinyurl.com/ANS095-New-Flight-Opp.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC
working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the
utilization of the International Space Station as a national
laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space
(http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a
list of all SSEP national partners, visit
http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP
National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message — April 2, 2015 for the
above information]
———————————————————————
21st Century Teacher Academy

The 21st Century Teacher Academy, or 21CTA, is a unique educator
professional development workshop opportunity for K-12 educators. The
workshop is designed to immerse teachers in the best practices and
methodologies to develope and implement real-world, project based learning,
or PBL, curriculum using NASA’s missions. 21CTA is sponsored by the Office
of Education and Public Outreach at NASA’s Ames Research Center, and funded
by NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate.

21CTA is a two-week workshop held July 8-22, 2015. The workshop will be led
by content experts, PBL experts, technical subject matter experts and a
master teacher. The workshop will take place at NASA’s Ames Research Center
in Moffett Field, California. Attendees will receive a $4,500 stipend.
Teacher teams are highly encouraged!

Applications are due April 30, 2015. Interested K-12 educators should apply
through NASA’s One-Stop Shopping Initiative website at
http://go.nasa.gov/1ECJ0kz.

If you have questions about the 21st Century Teacher Academy, please email
ARC-TeacherAcademy@mail.nasa.gov.

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message — April 2, 2015 for the above
information]
———————————————————————
US ARISS School Proposal Window Closes in 10 Days

ARISS is now accepting proposals for U.S. schools wishing to
schedule contacts between their students and the International Space
Station for the next cycle. Details on submitting proposals can be
found below in the attached ARRL News Release.

Message to US Educators

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station

Contact Opportunity

Call for Proposals
Proposal Window February 15 – April 15, 2015

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program
is seeking formal and informal education institutions and
organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates
that the contact would be held between *January 1, 2016 and June 30,
2016*. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact
contact dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS
is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of
participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
education plan.

The deadline to submit a proposal is April 15, 2015.
Proposal information and documents can be found at
www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate
in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are
approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students and educators
to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via
Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space
station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford
education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from
astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn
about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an
opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless
technology, and radio science. Because of the nature of human
spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the
ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate
changes in contact dates and times.

Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space
agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this educational
opportunity by providing the equipment and operational support to
enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and students
around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program is managed
by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and ARRL (American
Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA.

More Information

Interested parties can find more information about the program at
www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations,
proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of
Information Sessions go to www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please direct any questions to ariss at arrl.org.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between CEPES, Jodoigne, Belgium and
Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF using NA1SS The contact began
04-01 09:20 UTC and lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact
was telebridged via K6DUE.
ARISS Mentor was ON4WF.

+ A Successful contact was made between Mimar Sinan Özel Okullari,
Istanbul, Turkey and Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF using NA1SS The
contact began 04-01 09:20 UTC and lasted about nine and a half
minutes. Contact was telebridged via K6DUE.
ARISS Mentor was ON4WF.

From 2015-05-11 to 2015-06-14, there will be no US Operational
Segment (USOS) hams on board ISS. So any schools contacts during this
period will be conducted by the ARISS Russia team.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]
———————————————————————
Satellite Shorts From All Over

Links to ISS and SSTV Related Links as Reported by AMSAT-UK.ORG

ISS Fan Club – Tracking / Predictions
http://www.issfanclub.com/

Free MMSSTV Slow Scan TV software
http://hamsoft.ca/pages/mmsstv.php

iOS SSTV App
https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sstv/id387910013

For more on Slow Scan Television SSTV, see this article SSTV – The
Basics
http://www.essexham.co.uk/sstv-the-basics

How to be successful with the ISS Slow Scan Television (SSTV)
imaging system
http://www.marexmg.org/fileshtml/howtoisssstv.html

IZ8BLY Vox Recoder, enables you to record the signals from the ISS
on 145.800 MHz while you’re away at work
http://antoninoporcino.xoom.it/VoxRecorder/

ARISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) Blog and Gallery
http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.co.uk/

Information on the MAI-75 SSTV experiment
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/education-26.html

Video showing reception of SSTV using the FUNcube Dongle Pro SDR and
SDR-RADIO going into Virtual Audio Cable (VAC) then to MMSSTV
software

ISS SSTV received online with SUWS WebSDR
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/09/06/iss-sstv-on-suws-websdr/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-088

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT FieldOps Team SO-50 Operating Guide is Available
* AMSAT Hotel Room Reservations for Dayton Hamvention
* AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention — Call for volunteers
* ARISS School Proposal Window, for US, Remains Open Through April 15
* Tim Peake and ARISS – GB1SS Listening and Standing By
* Mark T. Vande Hei, KG5GNP, New Astronaut Ham
* Satellite operation from Isle of Mull
* Vote to Name the Next United Launch Alliance Rocket

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-088.01
ANS-088 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 088.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
March 29, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-088.01

AMSAT FieldOps Team SO-50 Operating Guide is Available

AMSAT’s Director of Field Operations, Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK says the
FieldOps team is working to make how-to-operate-satellites information
readily available on the web. Based on a hamfest handout designed and
written by Patrick, “Getting Started with the FM Satellites”, is available
for download. Patrick shows the basic equipment and techniques to learn
successful operating on the satellites. This guide also gives specific
information on how to operate via SO-50, the only currently available FM
satellite at the moment.

Patrick’s guide is posted at:

http://www.amsat.org –> Satellite Info –> Station and Operating Hints.

The direct link is http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=2144 where you’ll find the
link “Operating FM Satellites” (and a link to the Spanish version also).

[ANS thanks the AMSAT FieldOps Team for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Hotel Room Reservations for Dayton Hamvention

Once again, this year, as in previous years AMSAT has reserved a block of
rooms for the Dayton Hamvention at the Country Inn & Suites in Fairborn,
Ohio. The cost is $109 per night. The cutoff date for reservations is April
12.

First priority will be given to AMSAT members assisting with the booth
operations, satellite operating demonstrations, and the AMSAT Forum
presentations. Call Martha at the AMSAT office at 301-822-4376 to give her
your arrival/departure dates and your credit card information.

[ANS thanks Martha at the AMSAT Office for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention — Call for volunteers

Last year, we had 52 people assist with the AMSAT booth at the Dayton.  It
was the efforts of those volunteers that made the 2014 Dayton Hamvention a
success for AMSAT.

The interaction with AMSAT members, satellite operators, designers, and
builders makes the whole experience a lot of fun.

The 2015 Hamvention is May 15-17.  Would you consider helping AMSAT at
Dayton this year?

Whether you’re available for only a couple of hours or if you can spend the
entire weekend with us, your help would be greatly appreciated.

Please send an e-mail to Steve, n9ip at amsat.org if you can help.

[ANS thanks AMSAT’s Hamvention Chairman Steve Belter, N9IP for the above
information]

———————————————————————

ARISS School Proposal Window, for US, Remains Open Through April 15

ARISS is now accepting proposals for U.S. schools wishing to schedule contacts
between their students and the International Space Station for the next cycle.
Details on submitting proposals can be found below in the attached ARRL News
Release.

Message to US Educators

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station

Contact Opportunity

Call for Proposals
Proposal Window February 15 – April 15, 2015

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program
is seeking formal and informal education institutions and
organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS.  ARISS anticipates
that the contact would be held between *January 1, 2016 and June 30,
2016*. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact
contact dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS
is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of
participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
education plan.

The deadline to submit a proposal is April 15, 2015.
Proposal information and documents can be found at
www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate
in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are
approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students and educators
to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via
Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space
station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford
education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from
astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn
about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an
opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless
technology, and radio science. Because of the nature of human
spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the
ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate
changes in contact dates and times.

Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space
agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this educational
opportunity by providing the equipment and operational support to
enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and students
around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program is managed
by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and ARRL (American
Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA.

More Information

Interested parties can find more information about the program at
www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations,
proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of
Information Sessions go to www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please direct any questions to ariss at arrl dot org.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-081

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT Hotel Room Reservations for Dayton Hamvention
* AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention — First call for volunteers
* ITU Symposium Endorses Small Satellite Regulation and Communication Systems
Declaration
* Young Ham’s First Contact is via OSCAR Satellite
* Two Million Packets Uploaded to Data Warehouse (AO-73)
* Astronaut Issues Challenge for UK Students to Contact ISS
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-081.01
ANS-081 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 081.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE March 22, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-081.01

———————————————————————

AMSAT Hotel Room Reservations for Dayton Hamvention

Once again, this year, as in previous years AMSAT has reserved a block of
rooms for the Dayton Hamvention at the Country Inn & Suites in Fairborn,
Ohio. The cost is $109 per night. The cutoff date for reservations is April
12.

First priority will be given to AMSAT members assisting with the booth
operations, satellite operating demonstrations, and the AMSAT Forum
presentations. Call Martha at the AMSAT office at 301-822-4376 to give her
your arrival/departure dates and your credit card information.

[ANS thanks Martha at the AMSAT Office for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT at the Dayton Hamvention — First call for volunteers

Last year, we had 52 people assist with the AMSAT booth at the Dayton.  It
was the efforts of those volunteers that made the 2014 Dayton Hamvention a
success for AMSAT.

The interaction with AMSAT members, satellite operators, designers, and
builders makes the whole experience a lot of fun.

The 2015 Hamvention is May 15-17.  Would you consider helping AMSAT at
Dayton this year?

Whether you’re available for only a couple of hours or if you can spend the
entire weekend with us, your help would be greatly appreciated.

Please send an e-mail to Steve, n9ip@amsat.org if you can help.

[ANS thanks AMSAT’s Hamvention Chairman Steve Belter, N9IP for the above
information]

———————————————————————

ITU Symposium Endorses Small Satellite Regulation and Communication Systems
Declaration

International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) representatives were in Prague
earlier this month to join discussions on the regulatory aspects of orbits and
spectrum usage for nanosatellites and picosatellites. On hand for the
International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Symposium and WorkshopMarch 2-4
were IARU Vice President Ole Garpestad, LA2RR, and former IARU Region 1
President Hans Blondeel Timmerman, PB2T. In particular, discussions centered on
the application of the ITU Radio Regulations. The symposium concluded with the
unanimous endorsement of the “Prague Declaration on Small Satellite Regulation
and Communication Systems.”

“The symposium provided a unique opportunity for experts to examine the
procedures for notifying space networks and consider possible modifications to
enable the deployment and operation of small satellites,” said ITU Secretary-
General Houlin Zhao. “‘The Prague Declaration’ represents an important step in
this direction.”

More than 160 participants from some 40 countries attended the symposium. The
gathering is being considered an important step in preparing for the 2015 World
Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15) in Geneva November 2-27.

Delegates discussed challenges facing small satellite development, including
aspects related to national and international legal and regulatory issues,
frequency management, and radiocommunication standardization. Participants
reiterated the need to ensure the long-term sustainability of small satellites
in outer space. They stressed the importance of implementing national
regulatory frameworks that clearly define the rights and obligations of all
stakeholders, in conformance with international laws, regulations, and
procedures established by the UN General Assembly, the United Nations Committee
on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, and the and ITU.

These regulatory issues relate to the registration of objects launched into
outer space, frequency coordination, and the registration of satellite
networks, as well as compliance with the space debris mitigation guidelines.

ITU Radiocommunication Bureau Director François Rancy, said the ITU, in
partnership with key players, including academe, “is addressing newly emerging
requirements by various industry sectors to place small communication satellite
systems in orbit. “We are examining the regulatory aspects of the use of radio
frequency spectrum and satellite orbits to facilitate the launch and operation
of a new generation of small satellites,” he said.

The symposium was organized by ITU in cooperation with ITU Academia Member,
the Czech Technical University’s Faculty of Electrical Engineering (CTU FEE).

http://www.arrl.org/news/itu-symposium-endorses-small-satellite-regulation-and-
communication-systems-declaration

[ANS thanks the ARRL for the above information]

———————————————————————

Young Ham’s First Contact is via OSCAR Satellite

8-year-old radio amateur Hope Lea, KM4IPF made her first contact just 45
minutes after her callsign appeared in the FCC database. The contact with
Arthur, K4YYL, via the FO-29 satellite, took place on March 11, 2015 at
2100 UT.

Her elder sister Faith, WA4BBC and brother Zechariah, WX4TVJ got to work K4YYL
as well. They had both gained their US Technician licenses in February and
upgraded to the US General a couple of weeks later.

Hope’s younger sister is studying for her license.

Video of the contact is posted here:
https://vimeo.com/122112807

FO-29 information
http://amsat-uk.org/satellites/two-way-comms-satellites/fuji-oscar-29-jas-2/

John Heath G7HIA describes how to work FO-29 in this article
http://amsat-uk.org/beginners/radcom-getting-started-on-satellites/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-BB & AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Two Million Packets Uploaded to Data Warehouse (AO-73)

The FUNcube team are pleased to announce that the Data Warehouse has received
two million packets of telemetry data from ground stations around the world.

FUNcube-1 (AO-73) was launched on November 21, 2013 and since then radio
amateurs and schools have been receiving the telemetry packets transmitted by
the satellite and passing them to the AMSAT-UK Data Warehouse for analysis and
storage.

There are normally several people uploading the same packet but for the 2
millionth it was an individual:

• Carlos Eavis, G3VHF

The Data Warehouse statistics as of 09:53 UT on March 15, 2015 were:

Number of registered users: 1529
Number of active users (data received in last two weeks): 193
Number of active users since launch: 818

Number of packets transmitted by satellite since deployment: 8312304 (2.13 GB)
Number of packets uploaded by users before de-duplication: 8539662(2.19 GB)

Number of packets stored in warehouse: 2000000 (512 MB)

Number of packets recovered & stored – Time – Coverage
• Realtime 2M – 115 days – 25%
• HiRes 3.9M – 1085 minutes – 19%
• WOD 0.56M – 385.78 days – 80%

As always, many thanks for all those individuals and groups who are sending
data to the warehouse.

FUNcube-1 (AO-73) Telemetry:
• Dashboard App
http://funcube.org.uk/working-documents/funcube-telemetry-dashboard/
• Data Warehouse Archive
http://warehouse.funcube.org.uk/
• Whole orbit data
http://warehouse.funcube.org.uk/wod.html?satelliteId=2

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Astronaut Issues Challenge for UK Students to Contact ISS

Tim Peake KG5BVI, the first British ESA astronaut, has issued an invitation to
UK school pupils to contact him via amateur radio whilst he is in space.

Tim will launch to the International Space Station (ISS) in November of this
year and will spend 6 months working and living on the ISS. Thanks to a
collaboration between Amateur Radio on the International Space Stations
(ARISS), the UK Space Agency, the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) and the
European Space Agency (ESA), UK school pupils will be able to contact him
whilst he is on board the ISS via a scheduled amateur radio link-up.

The selected schools/organisations will host a direct link-up with the
International Space Station during a two-day, space related STEM workshop.
ARISS UK will provide and set up all necessary radio equipment (for example,
low earth orbit satellite tracking antennas and radios) to establishing a fully
functional, direct radio link with the International Space Station from their
very own premises. In a ten-minute window when the ISS will be over the UK, an
amateur radio contact will be established with Tim, and students will be able
to ask him questions about his life and work on board the ISS.

During the contact with Tim the students will be able to hear and potentially
see his response immediately. Tim will be using the amateur radio callsign
GB1SS whilst he is talking to UK based schools.

Schools throughout the United Kingdom are being invited to host one of a
limited number of these in-flight calls, which will include space workshops
where students can explore space, space related technologies, the relevance of
space to our digital lives and even analyse data being sent down from orbiting
satellites.

The students taking part in the link-up will have to obtain their full amateur
radio licence to be eligible to operate the radio and one lucky student at each
of the selected schools will be responsible for making contact with the ISS.

An RSGB team and the ARISS UK Operations team will work with the chosen
schools to prepare them for this exceptional opportunity during the mission of
the first British ESA Astronaut.

Tim Peake said:
“I hope to share as much of my mission as possible and am delighted that I
will be able to talk to UK students when the ISS flies over Britain, thanks to
the radio amateur equipment on board the International Space Station and the
ARISS programme.”

Jeremy Curtis, Head of Education at the UK Space Agency, added:
“Both Tim’s space mission and amateur radio have the power to inspire young
people and encourage them into STEM subjects. By bringing them together we can
boost their reach and give young people around the UK the chance to be involved
in a space mission and a hands-on project that will teach them new skills.”

Ciaran Morgan, M0XTD, R.S.G.B. Lead for ARISS and ARISS Operations in the UK,
said:
“Tim Peake, and his Principia mission to the ISS, offers students a unique
insight to space and amateur radio. ARISS (Amateur Radio on the International
Space Station) is delighted to be able to help UK students connect with Tim
whilst he is in space, using only amateur radio equipment on the ISS and in
schools, to help inspire our future generations of scientists, technicians,
engineers and mathematicians.”

John Gould, G3WKL, President of the RSGB said:
“The RSGB is delighted to be able to support the UK Space Agency and Tim’s
journey into space, and looks forward to working with the selected schools.”

How to Apply
The opportunity to be involved in this exciting project opens 20 March 2015.
Eligible institutions are invited to apply in order to register their interest.

Stage 1 application forms, available from the European Space Education
Resource Office web site at
http://tinyurl.com/ariss-timpeake
must be returned no later than Friday 24 April 2015.
Schools/Institutions that are to be invited to proceed to Stage 2 will be
notified in the week commencing 11 May 2015.

Stage 2 applications must be submitted and received by 26 June 2015.
There will then be a selection process involving the UK Space Agency, ESA,
ARISS and the RSGB. The successful schools will be announced at the UK Space
Conference on 14 July 2015.

UK National STEM Centre – Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
http://www.nationalstemcentre.org.uk/elibrary/media/500/ariss

[ANS thanks RSGB and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country.  Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Greater Houston Hamfest and 2015 ARRL Texas
State Convention in Rosenberg TX (southwest of Houston)

*Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ (22nd
Street, east of Columbus Blvd.)

*Friday, 3 April 2015 – presentation for the Associated Radio Amateurs
of Long Beach in Signal Hill CA (Signal Hill Community Center)

*Friday, 17 April 2015 – presentation for the Oro Valley Amateur Radio
Club in Tucson AZ

*Friday through Sunday, 1-3 May 2015 – ARRL Nevada State Convention in
Reno NV (Boomtown Casino Hotel)

*Saturday, 2 May 2015 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in
Sierra Vista AZ

*Thursday, 14 May 2015 – presentation for the Escondido Amateur Radio
Society in Escondido CA

*Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, May 15-17 2015, Dayton Hamvention in
Dayton OH (Hara Arena)

*Saturday, 6 June 2015 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show Low AZ

*Friday and Saturday, 12-13 June 2015 – HAM-COM in Irving TX (west of
Dallas)

*Friday and Saturday, 7-8 August 2015 – Austin Summerfest in Austin TX

*Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, October 16-18 2015, AMSAT Symposium in
Dayton OH (Dayton Crown Plaza)

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Recent Contacts

* Direct contacts with students at Collège Paul Langevin, Saint Junien,
France, via  F8KFZ/P, and at Ecole La Malmaison, Rueil-Malmaison, France, via
F6KFA/p were successful Thu 2015-03-19 08:17:56 UTC. Astronaut Samantha
Cristoforetti, IZØUDF answered questions for students at each school from the
ISS.  French astronaut Claudie Haigneré was on hand at Ecole La Malmaison to
answer additional questions.

The event could be seen in this link from Paul Langevin/F8KFZ (Contact starts
at 23’15”)
http://www.f8kfz.org/ariss-87-retransmission-en-direct/

and from this link from La Malmaison (Contact starts at 57’10”)
http://www.mairie-rueilmalmaison.fr/actualit%C3%A9s/th%C3%A8mes/jeunesse-
scolarit%C3%A9/en-direct-avec-lespace

Collège Paul Langevin

The Collège Paul Langevin, situated in the town center of Saint-Junien in the
west of the Haute Vienne and the Limousin (400 km south of Paris), is a former
primary school that became a general mixed college in 1964. The college follows
a general teaching syllabus and a further syllabus for teaching children of
special needs. The college is composed of 6 sixth year classes, 5 fifth year
classes, 5 fourth year classes, and 4 third year classes. Languages taught are
English, German, Spanish, and Latin. The college also has an athletic syllabus.

This school year, 2014–2015, the college has 615 students split over the four
years. This includes the special needs children who benefit from inclusion in
class life. There are 64 Students in this special needs program. These students
have significant and persistent difficulties in terms of academic learning, but
do not have intellectual disabilities.

Ecole La Malmaison

The elementary school La Malmaison is located in the department of Hauts-de-
Seine in the city of Rueil-Malmaison, about 15 km west of Paris, and 10 km away
from the Versailles Palace. The school is surrounded by famous historic places:
the Castle of Malmaison, where Napoleon Bonaparte and his wife Josephine de
Beauharnais lived at the end of the 18th Century; the banks of River Seine,
depicted by famous Impressionist painters (Renoir, Manet, and Monet) at the end
of the 19th century; Mount Valerien, with its national memorial of 2nd World
War French combatants; and the National Archeologic museum in the Castle of St
Germain-en-Laye city nearby.

The goal of this ARISS project is to encourage the children to study
scientific activities like  life aboard the ISS, the solar system, the day and
night caused by earth rotation, electricity experiences, the air quality on
Earth and on the ISS, the weight on earth and the zero-gravity in space. This
ARISS project is an opportunity to visit the Amateur RadioClub Station of Rueil-
Malmaison (F6KFA) and discover their experiences on radio waves phenomena,
learn the Morse code, and more.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

* Telebridge contacts with students at CEPES, Jodoigne, Belgium, and with
students at Mimar Sinan Özel Okullar i, Istanbul,Turkey, via K6DUE are
scheduled for Wed 2015-04-01 09:20:45 UTC 49 deg. Students will interview
astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, IZØUDF.

CEPES School

Cepes is situated in Jodoigne, a city in the French speaking region of
Belgium. It is a secundary school with 810 students. The students participating
in the ARISS project specialize in Sciences, Mathematics, Languages and Human
Sciences. They are 15 -20 years old.

During this school year, the curriculum is oriented to the ARISS contact :
– Movements of the Earth and planets
– Acquisition of scientific vocabulary
– Studies of volumes and surfaces
– Graphic studies
– Use of instruments and techniques in model building
– Study of the concept of scale and scaling in model building
– Electricity: electrical systems
– Read a map, compass rose, latitude, longitude
– The effect of weightlessness on the human body
– Translation of ARISS contact questions from French into English

Mimar Sinan Collage

Mimar Sinan College is situated in Istanbul, Turkey. The students prepared
the questions after they learned about the ISS during science lessons.They also
watched videos of astronauts working in the ISS.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie, AJ9N and David, AA4KN for the above information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

PQ2 Brazil Satellite Operation March 20-22 Delayed

Just a heads up for a DX opportunity that was scheduled to occur 3/20-22/2015.
The expedition expects a delay of 30 days before the expedition will occur.

Original Message:
Ohio/Penn DX Bulletin #1206

PQ2, BRAZIL (Satellite/6m Op). Operators Pedro/PR8ZX and Augusto/PU8MET
will be active as PQ2ZXT and PQ2/PU8MET, respectively, from Tocantins State
(WW Loc. GI64) between March 20-22nd. Activity will be on the satellites and
6 meters. There are very few operators in this state. QSL via LoTW or
their home callsign, direct or by the Bureau.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-BB for the above information]

N2IEN in Haiti 4/4-4/6

DXpedition to HH coming April 4-6!! Mostly HF cw, some SSB. And will
try to work SO 50 satellite. Hopefully I’ll also be QRV RTTY.

Pat has done very well from the rarely heard FJ and VP2V over the past
month with his Yaesu VX-8 and Arrow antenna. His QSL manager is NR6M.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-BB and Paul, N8HM for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-074

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT 2015 Hamfest Recruiting Brochure Available
* AMSAT Presence at 2015 Science City/Tucson Festival of Books
* New SpaceMath@NASA Resources Available
* 2015 NASA Office of Education — Aeronautics Undergraduate
Scholarship
* ARISS School Proposal Window, for US, Remains Open Through April 15
* More satellite DX News
* $50SAT/MO-76: 15 months, 15 orbits per day, and some unexpected
behavior
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over
SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-074.01
ANS-074 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 074.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE March 15, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-074.01
AMSAT 2015 Hamfest Recruiting Brochure Available

As hamfest season nears we’ve added a link to AMSAT’s 2015
Recruiting Brochure to the page listing the hamfests our AMSAT Field
Ops guys and helpers plan to attend:

http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=218

This color PDF file is a recruiting tool to help share the
excitement of AMSAT and amateur radio in space. The brochure
designed to print double-sided and be folded tri-fold. The AMSAT
office maintains a small stock of these printed brochures. They have
been included in the hamfest support boxes available to support your
event. For more information about these kits, contact:
martha at amsat dot org

If you are setting up a hamfest or club support activity let our
Director of Field Operations, Patrick WD9EWK know via
wd9ewk at amsat dot org and you will be listed on the events page.

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Field Ops team for the above information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT Presence at 2015 Science City/Tucson Festival of Books

AMSAT took part in the University of Arizona’s K7UAZ Amateur Radio
Club booth at the 2015 Science City/Tucson Festival of Books, on the
main mall of the University of Arizona in Tucson on Saturday, 14
March 2015. Science City/Tucson Festival of Books is a large science
fair held yearly in Tucson, and AMSAT is happy to support the K7UAZ
club.

More information about this event is available at:
http://www.sciencecity.arizona.edu/

During the day (0930-1730 local, 1630-0030 UTC), Patrick Stoddard
WD9EWK took advantage of opportunities for on-air demonstrations of
amateur satellite activity. Satellite demonstrations were conducted
using Patrick’s WD9EWK call sign. The radio club’s K7UAZ call sign
was used for making HF contacts. The University of Arizona campus is
in grid DM42.

Patrick posted updates during the day from Science City on his
@WD9EWK Twitter feed. If you aren’t on Twitter, you can view these
in a web browser at:

http://twitter.com/WD9EWK

Satellite QSOs made during the demonstration using Patrick’s WD9EWK
callsign will be uploaded to the Logbook of the World, and Patrick
have QSL cards available on request for those wanting to receive a
written confirmation. Please e-mail him with the
QSO details:
WDEWK at amsat dot org

The K7UAZ club callsign was used for using HF contacts, please
direct those QSL requests to the K7UAZ club, email to
k7uazarc at gmail dot com, or at the club’s postal address:

K7UAZ Amateur Radio Club
Systems & Industrial Engineering Department
The University of Arizona
1127 E. James E. Rogers Way
P.O. Box 210020
Tucson, AZ 85721-0020

PAtrick reports that QSOs were made using his WD9EWK callsign via AO-
7, AO-73, FO-29, SO-50 and a QSO using APRS messages via the ISS
packet digipeater. Patrick would like to thank Kirk Krenzel N7VGJ and
the K7UAZ Amateur Radio Club as well as the Ohio Valley Amateur Radio
Club W0HF, for their hospitality in Tucson.

[ANS thanks Patrick WD9EWK for the above information]
———————————————————————
New SpaceMath@NASA Resources Available

Explore behind-the-scenes mathematics that occur when scientists
make discoveries and engineers solve technical problems in spacecraft
design and spaceflight. Each module uses press releases to spark
student interest, then standards-based mathematics and science skills
are explored that relate to the missions discussed. New modules are
now available that focus on the SAGE III stratospheric aerosol
mission and the JPL InSight Mars Lander mission to be launched in
2016. The multimedia modules follow the 5E education
approach.

The SAGE III stratospheric aerosol mission modules are available at
http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov/SAGEIII/SAGEIII.html.

The JPL InSight Mars Lander mission modules are available at
http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov/Mars.html.

Questions about these resources should be directed to Dr. Sten
Odenwald at
sten.f.odenwald at nasa dot gov.

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message — March 5, 2015 for the
above information]
———————————————————————
2015 NASA Office of Education — Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting applications for the for the
Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship, or AUS, program. The
Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship is for individuals pursuing or
planning to pursue undergraduate studies leading to an Associate’s or
a Bachelor’s degree in areas related to aeronautics. These
scholarships are directed toward enhancing the state of aeronautics
for the nation, transforming the nation’s air transportation system,
and developing the knowledge, tools, and technologies to support
future air and space vehicles.

Eligible students include freshmen, sophomores and juniors at the
undergraduate level. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or nationals.
The scholarship includes 75% of tuition up to $9,000 academic
scholarship, based on tuition amount, and $6,000 for a summer
internship.

Applications are due March 31, 2015.

Applications should be submitted through the NASA One Stop Shopping
Initiative at http://intern.nasa.gov. Applicants should be sure to
select “scholarship” for the type of application.

Questions about the 2015 Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship
opportunity should be emailed to:
NASA.ASP2015 at nasaprs dot com.

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message — March 5, 2015 for the
above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS School Proposal Window, for US, Remains Open Through April 15

February 17, 2015 – ARISS is now accepting proposals for U.S. schools
wishing to schedule contacts between their students and the
International Space Station for the next cycle. Details on
submitting proposals can be found below in the attached ARRL News
Release.

Message to US Educators

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station

Contact Opportunity

Call for Proposals
Proposal Window February 15 – April 15, 2015

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program
is seeking formal and informal education institutions and
organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates
that the contact would be held between *January 1, 2016 and June 30,
2016*. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact
contact dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS
is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of
participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
education plan.

The deadline to submit a proposal is April 15, 2015.
Proposal information and documents can be found at
www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate
in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are
approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students and educators
to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via
Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space
station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford
education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from
astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn
about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an
opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless
technology, and radio science. Because of the nature of human
spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the
ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate
changes in contact dates and times.

Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space
agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this educational
opportunity by providing the equipment and operational support to
enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and students
around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program is managed
by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and ARRL (American
Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA.

More Information

Interested parties can find more information about the program at
www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations,
proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of
Information Sessions go to www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Information Sessions are available for those wishing to obtain
more information or to ask questions about the ARISS Proposal
process. Upcoming sessions will be held Monday March 16 at 7pm EDT
and Thursday March 26 at 4pm EDT. Those interested in attending one
of these sessions should send email to ariss at arrl dot org to
request login information.

Please direct any questions to ariss at arrl dot org.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]
———————————————————————
More satellite DX News:

Mike, WA0SPG, who will be on his first DXpedition, will be active as
WA0SPG/4 from the Dry Tortugas between May 4-6th. Activity will be on
the HF bands using CW and SSB. Equipment will be a KX3 and a FT-817
into a buddipole vertical dipole near saltwater, Alpha vertical and
Loop antenna.

Mike will also be on the satellite using 2x FT-817’s for SO-50 and
FO-29 (CW/SSB) with both arrow and elk antennas. All power will be by
Goal Zero batteries being charged by Solar PV panels. QSL via his
home callsign. Clayton, W5PFG says several AMSAT satellite operators
are working with Mike to prepare for this trip.

[ANS thanks the OPDX Bulletin, John Papay, K8YSE, and Clayton, W5PFG
for the above information]
———————————————————————
$50SAT/MO-76: 15 months, 15 orbits per day, and some unexpected
behavior

Saturday, February 21, 2015 marked the 15 month anniversary of the
launch of $50SAT/MO-76, and you guessed it – it is still operating.

Thursday, February 12, 2015 marked a different milestone – its orbit
has decayed to the point where its mean motion crossed the 15 orbits
per day threshold. The TLEs from Saturday, February 21, 2015
indicate it is now at 15.00521293 orbits per day.

Some people noticed that something odd started happening on Monday,
February 23, and Tuesday, February 24. The $50SAT/MO-76 team noticed
the same thing – during daytime passes in the northern hemisphere,
$50SAT was transmitting once per minute, always sending telemetry in
RTTY format, but never sending GFSK telemetry packets. Moreover, the
total reset count kept going up by one each time.

The link below will list all the RTTY telemetry messages (of which
the $50SAT/MO-76 team are aware) gathered on February 23 and 24:

http://amsat-uk.org/2015/03/05/mo-76-15-months/

What seems to be happening on the decending (daytime) passes is the
CPU is reset just after sending a full RTTY telemetry message, as
here are no GFSK packets sent, but within a half minute the FM Morse
beacon is heard with Stuart’s callsign (GW7HPW, the first one in the
rotation). The teams guess is that the battery voltage is decaying
during the operational cycle, and goes below the 2.9V reset threshold
just after sending the RTTY or just as it is about to send the GFSK
packets. nce the satellite is able to enable solar power (PCB
temperature >= 0 degrees C), it starts behaving normally; it is now
able to send GFSK packets. During ascending (nighttime) passes, it
behaves normally, at least here in EN82 land.

There was a brief time where this behavior stopped (2015-02-25,
17:05 UTC through 2015-02-26, 3:47 UTC). It did, however, start back
up sometime before 2015-02-26, 05:21 UTC, and has continued since.

Why is this happening now? The team is still investigating, but it is
apparent when looking at the chart of battery voltage over the
lifetime of $50SAT/MO-76 that the battery has suffered a sizeable
drop in capacity. If the battery voltage under load is dropping
below 2.9V, how is it able to recover back above 3.3 V (the minimum
required to enable transmission) and nearly complete another
operational cycle? Moreover, why does it always seem to be able to
finish sending an entire RTTY packet before resetting? In the hopes
of better understanding what is happening, I am in the process of re-
assembling my “BoxSat” test setup in an effort to reproduce on the
ground what is happening in space. In the meantime, the once-per-
minute transmission is actually convenient from telemetry monitoring
standpoint, as one no longer has to wait 3 minutes for $50SAT/MO-76
to start transmitting. So, for any of you who have not heard
$50SAT/MO-76, now is the time. Who knows how long it will continue
to operate in this manner? Who knows how long it will continue to
operated at all? Every time an anomaly has occurred and thought,
“this is it – well, it was great while it lasted”, $50SAT/MO-76 has
proven to survive. The team hopes that is the case here as well.

The Dropbox has been updated with all the telemetry observations
through (Wednesday, March 4 2015, and can be accessed via the
following URL:

http://tinyurl.com/ANS-074-50Dollar-Telemetry

I have also uploaded an MP3 file from the daytime pass over EN82
land on Friday, February 27, 2015 starting at 16:59 UTC (11:59 AM
local time); it can be accessed via the following URL:

http://tinyurl.com/ANS-074-50Dollar-MP3

During the recording, I switch back and forth between FM and LSB
modes so I can hear the FM Morse beacon as well as the RTTY telemetry.

Please keep the telemetry observations coming, especially now!

$50SAT was a collaborative education project between Professor Bob
Twiggs, KE6QMD, Morehead State University and three other radio
amateurs, Howie DeFelice, AB2S, Michael Kirkhart, KD8QBA, and Stuart
Robinson, GW7HPW. The transmitter power is just 100 mW on 437.505 MHz
(+/-9 kHz Doppler shift) FM CW/RTTY. $50SAT uses the low cost Hope
RFM22B single chip radio and PICAXE 40X2 processor.

There is a discussion group for $50SAT
http://groups.yahoo.com/groups/50dollarsat/

50DollarSat http://www.50dollarsat.info/

[ANS Thanks Michael Kirkhart KD8QBA, the $50SAT/MO-76 team and AMSAT-
UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS News

Double School Contact for Samantha Cristoforetti, IZØUDF

Saturday, March 7, 2015 at 10:51 UTC, 11:51 local time and at 12:29
UTC, 13:29 local time, students at “G. Salvemini – G. La Pira”,
Montemurlo, Italy, and “Dante Alighieri” 1st Grade Secondary (Middle)
School, Casale Monferrato, Italy established two ARISS contacts with
ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, IZØUDF onboard the
International Space Station. These were direct contacts performed by
Amateur radio ground stations IQ5VR, located at “G. Salvemini – G. La
Pira” in Montemurlo and IK1SLD located at “Dante Alighieri” School in
Casale Monferrato.

Presentation G. Salvemini – G. La Pira
The school “Salvemini – La Pira” is in Montemurlo, province of
Prato, Tuscany region and it is a Secondary Middle School; it has 21
classes with pupils aged between 11 and 14. The name of the school
derives from the fusion of the two schools of the commune. This is
the only secondary middle school of the area. The schoolhouse hosts
around 520 pupils.

Presentation “Dante Alighieri”
The “Dante Alighieri” School is situated a bit off the town centre
of Casale Monferrato, near the ancient Cittadella, province of
Alessandria, Piedmont region. It’s a modern construction, developed
on two main buildings: one for the school’s didactical and
administrative activities, one for the sport activities (gym and
pool). It’s surrounded by a wide playground, with a little plantation
of poplars, planted by the pupils of the school. There are 12
classrooms (4 at the main floor and 8 at the first floor) and
different labs: Science lab, Informatics lab, Techno lab, Art lab,
Maths lab, Languages lab and a coloured and wide library. There is
also a lot of afternoon activities, such as Latin courses, Languages
courses and sport tournaments (soccer, basket, volley). The Dante
Secondary I grade School has a current roll of 230 and a teaching
staff of 29. In the last few years the school has been enhanced by
the richness of its diverse student population.

Mentor Francesco De Paolis IK0WGF proposed to the radio coordinators
Mr. Alessandro Tesconi IK5EHI and Mr. Claudio Ariotti IK1SLD to set
up a combined direct contact, with the support by IK1SLD back-up
ground station and this was accepted. A phone conference call allowed
the full sharing of the events between all the contact sites
involved. The sequence of questions was made alternately by the
students at two schools. ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA
participating to the event in the Montemurlo school, presented the
International Space Station, talked about his experience aboard and
before the AOS trained the students for thecontact. Great Paolo!

Contact was established at 10:51 UTC, 11:51 local time with IR0ISS
via IK1SLD and then via IQ5VR, alternately. Mr. Claudio Ariotti
IK1SLD proposed to astronaut continue the contact during the
following orbit. ESA Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti IZ0UDF agreed.
During the first scheduled contact Cristoforetti answered 10
questions from students. Samantha Cristoforetti was really very
accurate in giving the answers with many details.

At 12:29 UTC, 13:29 local time, contact was established again with
IR0ISS, not on the primary channel, which was interfered, but on a
back-up channel where the event continued normally without problem.
During the second random contact Cristoforetti answered 11 questions
from students and exchanged greetings with the schools. Signals from
the ISS were good during both passes.

Both contacts established with IR0ISS were webcast live on:
http://www.livestream.com/amsat_italia (from Montemurlo)
http://www.livestream.com/ariss (from Casale Monferrato)

The Montemurlo event is available at:

The Casale Monferrato event is available at:
http://livestre.am/545U4

Regional and Local Televisions and newspapers covered the event
also. About 700 students, parents, visitors and media attended the
events at contact sites.

The event was announced on ESA Portal – National News:
http://tinyurl.com/ANS074-ESAPortalNews
(Information is in Italian)

[ANS thanks Francesco IK0WGF for the above information]

+ A Successful contact was made between SCHOOL CITY DIVISION
COUNTRY and Astronaut FNAME LNAME CALLSIGN using CALLSIGN
NA1SS/IRØISS. The contact began YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM UTC and lasted about
nine and a half minutes. Contact was direct/telebridged via CALLSIGN.
ARISS Mentor was CALLSIGN.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Collège Paul Langevin, Saint Junien, France, direct via F8KFZ/P and
Ecole “La Malmaison”, Rueil-Malmaison, France, direct via F6KFA/p
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be IRØISS
The scheduled astronaut is Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF
Contact is a go for: Thu 2015-03-19 08:17:56 UTC

ARISS is always glad to receive listener reports for any of the
contacts. ARISS thanks everyone in advance for their assistance.
Feel free to send your reports to
aj9n at amsat dot org or aj9n at aol dot com.
[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]
———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-067

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT-NA and M2 Antenna Systems Announce Member-Only Special Pricing
* Fox-1A Delivery and P-POD Integration Set For March 25
* AMSAT and University of Iowa Partner on Scientific Payload for Fox-1D
* ISS Deploys Cubesats
* I0/W5PFG/P Active on Satellites from Italy
* Upcoming ARISS Contact 07 March 2015
* Danish Astronaut Earns Technician License
* NASA JPL 2115 MHz Moonshine Signals Received in Australia

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-067.01
ANS-067 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 067.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
March 8, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-067.01

AMSAT-NA and M2 Antenna Systems Announce Member-Only Special Pricing

M2 Antenna Systems, Inc. of Fresno, CA introduced the new satellite antenna LEO-
Pack using their 436CP16 and 2MCP8A yagis during the 2015 HamCation in Orlando,
FL.

The 436CP16 and 2MCP8A are light weight, circularly polarized antennas optimized
for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Satellite communications or other applications where a
small circular polarized antenna is required. Optimum match and gain designed
for the satellite band.

Rear mounted for easy coaxial cable routing. A preamp (not included) can be
mounted close to the antenna for almost no coax loss before the preamp,
maximizing your receive performance.

Computer design techniques help keep spurious side lobes down for optimum signal
to noise rations. Both the 436CP16 and 2MCP8A feature the same CNC machined, O-
ring and silicone-gel sealed, driven element assemblies common to all M2 Yagi
Antennas. This insures years of trouble free performance regardless of weather.

M2 designed a custom LEO cross boom to pair these two antennas together for a
very manageable amateur satellite ground station.

AMSAT-NA and M2 Antenna Systems are pleased to announce that the LEO-Pack system
is being offered to members only at $499, shipping included (US only). Non-
members can join AMSAT-NA at time of purchase to participate in this special
purchase. The M2 list price is $545.99.

To place your order, visit the AMSAT store at: http://store.amsat.org/catalog/

M2 Antenna System’s LEO-Pack page can be found at: http://tinyurl.com/nyhgmcr

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Store and Robert Brown, KR7O, Amateur Marketing and Sales
Manager at M2 Antenna Systems for the above information]

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Fox-1A Delivery and P-POD Integration Set For March 25

Following the successful conclusion of vibration and thermal/vacuum testing
Fox-1 now is stored in a clean environment waiting for launch. AMSAT Vice-
President Engineering, Jerry Buxton, N0JY says several required reports are
being reviewed by the launch provider. Fox-1 completed its Mission Readiness
Review (MRR) at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo CA on February 24 before a review
board of Cal Poly and NASA representatives.

Jerry sums it all up, “Fox-1A delivery/P-POD integration is now set, for March
25, 2015 at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo.  From there, we won’t see her again –
but certainly look forward to hearing from her again!”

Ongoing updates will be posted on the AMSAT web page, on the AMSAT-NA Facebook
page, and in the AMSAT Journal.

[ANS thanks AMSAT Vice-President Engineering, Jerry Buxton, N0JY for the above
information]

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AMSAT and University of Iowa Partner on Scientific Payload for Fox-1D

AMSAT and the University of Iowa have agreed to include the University’s
HERCI (High Energy Radiation CubeSat Instrument) radiation mapping
experiment on Fox-1D. According to Don Kirchner, KDØL, Research Engineer at
the University of Iowa, “HERCI is intended to provide a mapping of radiation
in a low earth orbit. This is of scientific interest for planning CubeSat
test flights for low energy X-Ray detectors.”

“The instrument consists of a digital processing unit (DPU) derived from
processors currently in orbit around Saturn on Cassini and on the way to Jupiter
on the Juno spacecraft,” says Kirchner. “The DPU was shrunk to a CubeSat form
factor with funding from the Iowa Space Grant Consortium.”

The University of Iowa’s history in spaceflight research dates back to the
earliest satellites. As Kirchner puts it, “HERCI can be considered a direct
descendent of the first University of Iowa spaceflight instrument flown on
Explorer I in 1958.  The instrument is being constructed as a Senior Design
Project by four Electrical Engineering students from the UI College of
Engineering, under supervision of Space Physics engineering staff from the
Department of Physics and Astronomy.”

AMSAT’s VP of Engineering, Jerry Buxton, NØJY, noted the win-win benefits of
the agreement, stating, “This partnership with the University of Iowa
illustrates our strategy of leveraging the new CubeSat design to assist
universities that need a way to fly scientific payloads while providing a
viable ongoing platform for amateur radio.”

[ANS thanks Jerry, N0JY, for the above information]

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I0/W5PFG/P Active on Satellites from Italy

Clayton, W5PFG, will be active as I0/W5PFG/P from Italy  between March 7-12th.
He will operate the satellites from Rome (WW Loc. JN61et). He states, “Due to my
work schedule, I will only be available to work satellite passes in the late
evening or early morning hours. If you would like to schedule a contact, please
send an E-mail to w5pfg at arrl.net.

[ANS thanks Ohio/Penn DX Bulletin No. 1205 for the above information]

———————————————————————

ISS Deploys Cubesats

Lambda-Sat was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) from the
Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia on July 13, 2014, in an Orbital Sciences’
Antares rocket CRS-2/ORB-2. Deployment from the ISS took place on March 4, 2015
along with the MicroMAS CubeSat. This followed the deployment of two other
CubeSats GEARRSAT and TechEdSat-4.

The Lambda team encourages amateur radio operators around the world to listen
for and report the Lambda-Sat signal.

Frequency: 437.462 MHz
Downlink: AX.25 Unnumbered Information (UI) packets at 1200 bps AFSK
Transmission Power : 1W
Call Sign KK6DFZ

The Secretary of the Cyprus Amateur Radio Society (CARS) Nestor 5B4AHZ has
written an article on Lambda-Sat, he says:

The naming of the Lambda-sat satellite came from the Greek letter L, lambda, a
reminder of Hellas, Helios, the Greek word Thalassa for sea, the Greek word
Lithos which directly translates to stone (meaning “Land of Light”).

The Lambda-sat was constructed entirely of Greek volunteers who worked
feverishly, selflessly and without any personal gain. Members of Lambda-sat
contributed to the construction of the satellite system each with their
knowledge in robotics, electronics, software development and telecommunications.
The group consists of young people from Greece who traveled to Silicon Valley in
California to participate in this project.

“I want to motivate the youth in Greece to continue to dream,” says the original
initiator of the project, Periklis Papadopoulos, Professor of Aerospace
Engineering of the Federal University of California San Jose, which has been
awarded from NASA for his contribution with the prize Turning Goals Into Reality
(TGIR). As the professor states, “My goal is to demonstrate the capabilities of
young people in Greece.” The professor believes that our country could be active
in this area and this is not an economic issue, but a question of will alone.

Reception reports of Lambda-Sat came be submitted to:
http://lambdasat.com/?page_id=181

Additional Lambda-Sat links:
Lambda-Sat http://lambdasat.com/

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/lambdateam

Article on Lambda-Sat by Nestor 5B4AHZ
http://www.cyhams.org/index.php/en/news-and-events/359-the-first-greek-
microsatellite-is-a-fact

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Upcoming ARISS Contact 07 March 2015

An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants
at G. Salvemini – G. La Pira, Montemurlo, Italy, and “Dante Alighieri” 1st Grade
Secondary (Middle) School, Casale Monferrato, Italy on 07 Mar. The event is
scheduled to begin at approximately 10:51 UTC. The duration of the contact is
approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds. The contact will be direct between
IR0ISS and two other stations IK1SLD and IQ5VR. The contact should be audible
over portions of Italy and adjacent areas. Interested parties are invited to
listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted in
English/Italian.

The school “Salvemini – La Pira” is in Montemurlo, province of Prato, Tuscany
region and it is a Secondary Middle School; it has 21 classes with pupils aged
between 11 and 14. The name of the school derives from the fusion of the two
schools of the commune. This is the only secondary middle school of the area.
The schoolhouse hosts around 520 pupils.

The “Dante Alighieri” School is situated a bit off the town centre of Casale
Monferrato, near the ancient Cittadella, province of Alessandria, Piedmont
region. It’s a modern construction, developed on two main buildings: one for the
school’s didactical and administrative activities, one for the sport activities
(gym and pool). It’s surrounded by a wide playground, with a little plantation
of poplars, planted by the pupils of the school. There are 12 classrooms (4 at
the main floor and 8 at the first floor) and different labs: Science lab,
Informatics lab, Techno lab, Art lab, Maths lab, Languages lab and a coloured
and wide library. There is also a lot of afternoon activities, such as Latin
courses, Languages courses and sport tournaments (soccer, basket, volley). The
Dante Secondary I grade School has a current roll of 230 and a teaching staff of
29. In the last few years the school has been enhanced by the richness of its
diverse student population.

[ANS thanks Dave, AA4KN, for the above information]

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Danish Astronaut Earns Technician License

Danish Astronaut Andreas Mogensen Andreas Mogensen completed his
license class on Feb 23 and passed his exam on Feb 25. He has been
assined the callsign KG5GCZ.

Andreas was selected as an ESA astronaut in May 2009 and completed the
astronaut basic training programme at the European Astronaut Centre in
Cologne, Germany in November 2010. Since completing the astronaut
basic training programme, Andreas has been trained and certified as a
private pilot by the Lufthansa flight school and is trained and
qualified for spacewalks using both the American EMU suit and the
Russian Orlan suit.

Andreas has been assigned to a 10-day mission to the International
Space Station to be launched September 2015 on the Soyuz TMA-18M
spacecraft. He will be the first astronaut of Danish nationality to go
to space.

[ANS thanks ARISS and ESA for the above information]

———————————————————————

NASA JPL 2115 MHz Moonshine Signals Received in Australia

Last week’s NASA JPL EME lunar ranging experiment was received in Australia.
On Tuesday March 3 between 0600 to 0900 UTC, the JPL tested its Lunar
Ranging Experiment. With JPL using 20 kilowatts into a 34-metre antenna, it
was suggested that reception of the reflected signal would be possible on a
basic receiving antenna.

This inspired Noel Ferguson VK3FI in Mildura, who decided to have a listen.
As his three metre dish was out of service, he decided to try an old “grid
pack” pay TV antenna to pick up the reflection on 2115 MHz.

The initial noise floor was about strength five. The reflected signal first
appeared as the moon rose over the tree line at about 0820 UTC, with the
moon’s distance at that time about four hundred and three thousand
kilometers from earth.

Signals in Mildura peaked at strength seven using the FT847 as an IF on 164
MHz. Noel VK3FI reports that reception continued through to 0900 UTC, when
the JPL test was terminated. Well done on getting that signal.

[ANS thanks Vk1wia-news, Australia’s WIA News for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-060

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* ISS SSTV in a Brazilian School
* Space Station SSTV and Packet Radio via SUWS WebSDR
* SSTV From the ISS Completed This Week
* CubeSats Offered Deep-space Ride on ESA Asteroid Probe
* Live Broadcast of Space Launch System Booster Test Firing
* ARISS SSTV Diploma Available
* AMSAT at the Yuma Hamfest Wrapup Report
* Central States VHF Society Call for Papers
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-060.01
ANS-060 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 060.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE March 8, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-060.01

———————————————————————

ISS SSTV in a Brazilian School

One of the members of the newly formed Brazil’s AMSAT-BR group, Paulo,
PV8DX, demonstrated amateur radio on Monday, February 23, 2015 at the
Gonçalves Dias school when he demonstrated receiving an ISS SSTV picture on
145.800 MHz FM.

The ISS pass he received did not produce a strong signal and only part of
the picture was captured but as can be seen from the video the students were
enthusiastic and excited to be receiving a signal from space.

Paulo expressed the hope that the ISS will send images on school days more
often.

AMSAT-BR
https://sites.google.com/site/amsatbr/

Information on receiving ISS SSTV
http://amsat-uk.org/2015/02/11/more-iss-slow-scan-tv/

[ANS thanks Paulo, PV8DX and AMSAT-BR for the above information]

———————————————————————

Space Station SSTV and Packet Radio via SUWS WebSDR

Martin Ehrenfried G8JNJ reports excellent SSTV and Packet Radio signals from
the International Space Station (ISS) using the online SUWS WebSDR.

The omni-direction helix antennas at the WebSDR were designed with high
elevation satellites in mind. Conventional antennas concentrate the radiation
pattern towards the horizon resulting in weaker signals when a satellite is
above 15 degrees elevation. Comparisons with other WebSDRs show the SUWS
antennas provide a 6 to 10dB better signal to noise ratio on similar passes.

Martin says: “I had been experimenting with single turn ‘twisted halo’ design,
and decided to try stacking them to see if I could achieve more gain. Modelling
suggested that a stretched 3 turn helix with a helix circumference of approx
1/2 wave length and an overall length of 1/2 wave at 70cm, and fed with a gamma
match at the centre would offer reasonable gain, an omni-directional pattern
and mixed polarisation.”

You can use the free online SUWS Web Software Defined Radio from your PC or
Laptop to receive the ISS and the many amateur radio satellites transmitting in
the 144-146 MHz or 435-438 MHz bands. It also provides reception of High
Altitude Balloons in the 434 MHz band and coverage of the microwave 10368-10370
MHz band.

The SUWS WebSDR is located at Farnham not far from London, 51.3 N 1.15 W,
listen to it at
http://websdr.suws.org.uk/

Full details of the antennas are available at
http://g8jnj.webs.com/currentprojects.htm

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

SSTV From the ISS Completed This Week

Following a short delay in amateur radio operations aboard the ISS due to
schedule changes in EVA activity, the Slow Scan Television transmissions
were sent on Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday, February 22-24. The transmissions
originated from the Russian segment of the ISS using a modified Kenwood
radio and an external antenna on the ISS. The callsign of RS0ISS was used.

SSTV signals received on 145.800 MHz using the PD180 high resolution mode
featured 12 different photos of the first cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. Also
included was a photo of a commemorative diploma created by the National
Polish Amateur Radio Society celebrating the 80th anniversary of Gagarin’s
birthday.

Images received by radio amateurs world-wide may be viewed on-line at:
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/

AMSAT-UK provides a good reference page to prepare amateur radio operators
to set up their stations for future SSTV events from the ISS:
http://amsat-uk.org/2015/02/11/more-iss-slow-scan-tv/

Enthusiastic comments posted on amsat-bb indicated world-wide success:

Fer, IW1DTU wrote, “ISS SSTV, strong signal.”

Roland, PY4ZBZ wrote, “Picture received in Brazil 22 feb 2015:
http://www.qsl.net/py4zbz/satelite/Hist33.jpg

Ken, GW1FKY commented, “Received very strong and clear pictures using my
Kenwood THD-7 on a
pass 1416 hrs plus, at my QTH in Wales UK. This was despite very heavy rain
and severe flooding in the area.

Greg, KO6TH wrote, “I’ve never received a clearer SSTV picture from
anywhere, let alone outer space! Using a Yaesu FT-847 and MMSSTV software
running under Wine on my OpenSuSE Linux box.”

Steve, AI9IN wrote, “Just got a nice download of picture 12/12 Series 1 from
ISS. Have a 5/8 wave vertical on the roof going to an old Yaesu 2 m
multi-mode used MMSSTV. My first SSTV from the ISS!”

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

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CubeSats Offered Deep-Space Ride on ESA Asteroid Probe

Think of it as the ultimate hitchhiking opportunity: ESA is offering CubeSats
a ride to a pair of asteroids in deep space. CubeSats are among the smallest
types of satellites: formed in standard cubic units of 10 cm per side, they
provide affordable access to space for small companies, research institutes and
universities. One-, two- or three-unit CubeSats are already being flown.

Teams of researchers and companies from any ESA Member State are free to
compete. The selected CubeSats will become Europe’s first to travel beyond
Earth orbit once the Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) is launched in October 2020.

“AIM has room for a total of six CubeSat units,” explains Ian Carnelli,
managing the mission for ESA. “So potentially that might mean six different one-
unit CubeSats could fly, but in practice it might turn out that two three-unit
CubeSats will be needed to produce meaningful scientific return.

“We’re looking for innovative ideas for CubeSat-hosted sensors that will boost
and complement AIM’s own scientific return.

“We also intend to use these CubeSats, together with AIM itself and its
asteroid lander, to test out intersatellite communications networking.

“ESA’s SysNova initiative will be applied to survey a comparatively large
number of alternative solutions, this competition framework giving industry and
universities the opportunity to work together on developing their scientific
investigations in a field that is the technological cutting edge.”

Beginning its preliminary Phase-A/B design work next month, ESA’s AIM
spacecraft will be humanity’s first mission to a binary system – the paired
Didymos asteroids, which come a comparatively close 11 million km to Earth in
2022. The 800 m-diameter main body is orbited by a 170 m moon.

AIM will perform high-resolution visual, thermal and radar mapping of the
moon. It will also put down a lander – ESA’s first touchdown on a small body
since Rosetta’s Philae landed on a comet last November.

AIM also represents ESA’s contribution to a larger international effort, the
Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission.

The NASA-led Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) probe will impact the
smaller body, while AIM will perform detailed before-and-after mapping,
including pinpointing any shift in the asteroid’s orbit.

“While it will return invaluable science,” adds Ian, “AIM is conceived as a
technology demonstration mission, testing out various technologies and
techniques needed for deep space expeditions in future.

“These include two-way high-bandwidth optical communications – with data being
returned via laser beam to ESA’s station in Tenerife – as well as
intersatellite links in deep space and low-gravity lander operations.

“Once demonstrated, these capabilities will be available to future deep-space
endeavours, such as Lagrange-point observatories returning large amounts of
data and sample return missions to Phobos – and ultimately Mars – as well as
crewed missions far beyond Earth orbit.”

The chance to put forward CubeSats is being organised as a SysNova
competition, an initiative by ESA’s General Studies Programme – which is
running the AIM project – to compare innovative solutions to space mission
challenges.

Interested teams can get more information from the published announcement of
opportunity. As a next step, qualified teams can submit initial ‘challenge
responses’ describing their proposed mission concepts and how they address the
defined technical challenges associated with operating such small spacecraft
close to an asteroid.

The winning submissions will then be funded by ESA for further study over the
next seven months, following up with a final review at ESA’s ESTEC technical
centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The victors will then work with ESA to
elaborate their designs, including sessions at ESTEC’s Concurrent Design
Facility.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/CubeSats_offered_deep_space_ride_on_ESA_
asteroid_probe_999.html

[ANS thanks the Staff Writers at Spacedaily.com for the above information]

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Live Broadcast of Space Launch System Booster Test Firing

Did you know that NASA is building the largest solid propellant rocket
booster in the world? NASA will test this booster, designated Qualification
Motor-1, or QM-1, on March 11, 2015, at the Orbital ATK test facility in
Promontory, Utah. The test is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. EDT.

QM-1 is a five-segment solid propellant booster that will help power the
Space Launch System. The two-minute, full-duration static test is a huge
milestone for the SLS Program and will qualify the booster design for
high-temperature conditions. This type of test typically comes only after
multiple years of development and signifies major progress being made on the
rocket. Once this test and a second, low-temperature test planned for early
2016 are complete, the hardware is qualified and ready for the first flight
of SLS.

NASA’s Space Launch System will be used to help send humans to deep space
destinations like an asteroid and Mars. SLS is an advanced, heavy-lift
launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new capability for science and
human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit. The SLS will give the nation a means
to reach beyond our current limits and open new doors of discovery from the
unique vantage point of space.

The test will be streamed at
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html
and broadcast on NASA TV.
Please make plans to watch with your students and colleagues.

To learn more about the Space Launch System, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Feb. 26, 2015 for the
above information]

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ARISS SSTV Diploma Available

Radio amateurs from Poland created a diploma commemorating the SSTV activity
from the International Space Station on the occasion of the 80th anniversary of
Juri Gagarin’s birthday. This homage to the first man in space coincides with
the 85th anniversary of the Polish Amateur Radio Union (PZK), established
February 24th, 1930. A photo of the diploma is included in the series of
pictures transmitted from the International Space Station.

If you wish to receive a printed version of the individual commemorative
diploma with your name, surname and call sign, we cordially invite you to share
your images received from the ISS. For this purpose please upload received
images to the website

http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

and e-mail a report to the coordinator (address e-mail is below) with your
working conditions, equipment and antennas, used for reception of the signals
from, the ISS. Please mention your first and last names, your call sign and
your locator. Some published photos will possibly be used in the future for an
educational purpose.  If you publish pictures on the page above you agree with
this.

From Polish stations we expect a complete audio record (containing the SSTV
signal and the background noise as well) of the whole ISS pass over the
station. It would be great to receive a similar report from all participants,
but this is not required. However, if you decide to share audio, please put a
time stamp at the end of the recording, with a precision up to 1 second, e g
23:51:54 UTC.

Reports are to be sent to koordynator.ariss@gmail.com. As subject please
mention SSTV3ISS [YOUR CALLSIGN] [LOCATOR].

If you capture and post the picture of the Polish diploma, you can ask for a
special QSL card commemorating the 85th anniversary of PZK. For this purpose,
please send a separate request to koordynator.ariss@gmail.com. As subject
please mention QSL1RS0ISS [YOUR CALLSIGN].

QSL cards and certificates will be sent via QSL bureau. If you wish to receive
them via traditional mail or if you are not served by a QSL bureau, please send
an empty self-addressed envelope and two IRC (international reply coupons) to:

Zespol Szkol Technicznych
ARISS
ul. Poznanska 43
63-400 Ostrow Wielkopolski
Poland

We are looking forward to your reports and requests until March 4th at 23:59
UTC.

[ANS thanks ARISS, and Jurek Jakubowski, SP7CBG, for the above information]

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AMSAT at the Yuma Hamfest Wrapup Report

AMSAT Vice President for Field Operations, Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK,
writes a little about the two-day Yuma Hamfest that he attended
with an AMSAT booth. “This hamfest has become (I think) the largest
in Arizona, and I heard that over 1000 hams attended. It draws hams
from all over Arizona, California, Nevada, and the “snowbirds” from
other parts of the US and Canada. And a few hams came up from
northern Mexico to join in the fun.

There was steady traffic past the AMSAT booth on both days. I had
Rick, K7TEJ helping me for much of the weekend, and his help was
appreciated very much. He left his homebrew dual-band Yagi (2
elements on 2m, 5 on 70cm) on a telescope mount and tripod at
the AMSAT booth during the two days, along with my Elk 2m/70cm
log periodic.  Between the two of us, we had demonstrations on two
AO-73 passes, two SO-50 passes, and one pass each on 3 other
satellites (AO-7, FO-29, NO-44), with a total of 34 QSOs. Lots of
flyers and the Getting Started with Amateur Satellites books were
flying off the table, and we had good crowds for the demonstrations
outside the main building on the Yuma County Fairgrounds. I posted
pictures from the hamfest over the two days on my @WD9EWK
Twitter feed. You are welcome to look through my feed and see those
photos and other comments at:

http://twitter.com/WD9EWK

if you are not a Twitter user.

The SO-50 passes, as expected, were the busiest of the passes worked
from Yuma. Much of the time, those passes were great illustrations of
what can be heard on an FM satellite. Even some of the not-so-good
operating examples made for excellent teaching moments.

I don’t have any videos of the demonstrations this year, but have some
videos of the aircraft flying into or out of Marine Corps Air Station Yuma,
the airfield across the street from the hamfest site (the runways at that
airfield are shared with Yuma International Airport, with both civilian and
military aircraft coming and going throughout the day). Those videos,
and others I have uploaded over the years, can be viewed at:

http://www.youtube.com/va7ewk

Thanks to everyone who worked WD9EWK during the hamfest. And a
special thank-you for those who were standing by to work me, as I tried
to complete QSOs with other stations that may have been closer to their
LOS times than you. I have uploaded those QSOs to Logbook of the
World. Please e-mail me directly (with QSO details) if you’d like to
receive a WD9EWK QSL card to confirm those QSOs. You don’t have
to send me a card or SASE first. The hamfest was in grid DM22.

73!”

[ANS thanks Patrick, WD9EWK/VA7EWK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Central States VHF Society Call for Papers

The Central States VHF Society is calling for the submission of papers,
presentations and posters for the upcoming 49th Annual Central States VHF
Society Conference slated for July 23rd through the 26th in Denver,
Colorado.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to antennas, propagation,
satellites, test equipment, digital modes, contesting and the like. Non-weak
signal topics, such as FM, Repeaters, packet radio and other utility
communications modes are generally not considered acceptable, however, there
are always exceptions. Please contact the Proceedings Chair John Maxwell if
you have any questions about the suitability of a topic. His e-mail is
w0vg@arrl.net .

Registration is online now at
www.csvhfs.org.

[ANS thanks the Central States VHF Society for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country.  Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Saturday, 7 March 2015 – Irving Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Irving TX (west of Dallas)

*Friday and Saturday, 13-14 March 2015 – Green Country Hamfest in
Claremore OK (northeast of Tulsa)

*Saturday, 14 March 2015 – Science City 2015/Tucson Festival of Books
in Tucson AZ (on the University of Arizona Main Mall)

* Saturday, 14 March 2015 0900 – 1630 – 2015 Palm Springs Hamfest at the Palm
Springs Pavilion

*Friday and Saturday, 20-21 March 2015 – Acadiana Hamfest in Rayne LA
(west of Lafayette)

*Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Weatherford Hamfest in Weatherford TX (west
of Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex)

*Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Scottsdale AZ (northeast of Phoenix, near AZ-101/Princess Drive)

*Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Greater Houston Hamfest and 2015 ARRL Texas
State Convention in Rosenberg TX (southwest of Houston)

*Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ (22nd
Street, east of Columbus Blvd.)

*Friday, 3 April 2015 – presentation for the Associated Radio Amateurs
of Long Beach in Signal Hill CA (Signal Hill Community Center)

*Friday, 17 April 2015 – presentation for the Oro Valley Amateur Radio
Club in Tucson AZ

*Friday through Sunday, 1-3 May 2015 – ARRL Nevada State Convention in
Reno NV (Boomtown Casino Hotel)

*Saturday, 2 May 2015 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in
Sierra Vista AZ

*Thursday, 14 May 2015 – presentation for the Escondido Amateur Radio
Society in Escondido CA

*Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, May 15-17 2015, Dayton Hamvention in
Dayton OH (Hara Arena)

*Saturday, 6 June 2015 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show Low AZ

*Friday and Saturday, 12-13 June 2015 – HAM-COM in Irving TX (west of
Dallas)

*Friday and Saturday, 7-8 August 2015 – Austin Summerfest in Austin TX

*Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, October 16-18 2015, AMSAT Symposium in
Dayton OH (Dayton Crown Plaza)

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

* About Gagarin from space event school in Saint Petersburg, Russia, direct
via RA1AJN
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be  RSØISS
The scheduled astronaut is Anton Shkaplerov
Contact was  successful 2015-02-26 12:27 UTC

* Riversink Elementary School,  Crawfordville, FL, direct via K4WAK
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled  to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF
Contact was successful: Thu 2015-02-26  15:15:56 UTC 77 deg

A report entiled “Thanks” was posted on the AMSAT-BB
“Just wanting to give a big ‘Thank You’ to this group….
I was approached by a local elementary school to host an ARISS Contact about
16 months ago.
For more than a year I have been pestering many of you (mostly off the
reflector) for information to get a good grip on this facet of the hobby.
Yesterday I (with the assistance of a few from my radio club) conducted a great
contact.
As grateful as I am to the folks in the club for helping with the contact, many
of you here deserve just as much recognition.
Thank You!
….. Many of you dealt with ’20 questions’ about the smallest of details
sometimes, and those little things made for a great one. As a result I have a
grandson that’s ‘on top of the world’ and several club members with permanent
smiles….. And a very happy school full of kids & staff.

Thank You!

Doug
K4GKJ”

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

* Direct contacts with students at G. Salvemini – G. La Pira, Montemurlo,
Italy, direct via  IQ5VR and at  “Dante Alighieri” 1st Grade Secondary (Middle)
School, Casale  Monferrato, Italy, direct via IK1SLD The ISS callsign is
presently scheduled  to be IRØISS with astronaut is Samantha Cristoforetti
IZØUDF are scheduled for Sat 2015-03-07 10:51:41 UTC 30  deg.

G. Salvemini – G. La Pira
“Salvemini – La Pira” is a secondary middle schoo located in Montemurlo,
province of Prato, in the Tuscany region. The school has 21 classes with pupils
ages 11 to 14 with a total of 520 pupils. The name of the school derives from
the fusion of the two schools of the commune. This is the only secondary middle
school in the area.

“Dante Alighieri”
The “Dante Alighieri” School is situated outside the town center of Casale
Monferrato, near the ancient Cittadella, province of Alessandria, in the
Piedmont region. It is a modern construction, developed on two main buildings:
one for the school’s didactical and administrative activities, one for the
sport activities (gym and pool). It is surrounded by a wide playground, with a
little plantation of poplars, planted by the pupils of the school. There are 12
classrooms (4 on the main floor and 8 on the first floor) and several labs,
including a Science Lab, Informatics Lab, Techno Lab, Art Lab, Maths Lab, and a
Languages Lab, and a colorful  and expansive library. There also a lot of
afternoon activities, such as Latin courses, languages courses and sport
tournaments (soccer, basket, volleyball). The Dante Secondary I grade School
has a current roll of 230 students and a teaching staff of 29. In the last few
years the school has been enhanced by the richness of its diverse student
population..

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

S-band Moonbounce Update

The frequency and schedule has changed slightly..
As before, we’re going to aim at Tycho from DSS-24 (34m antenna)
We’ll radiate at 2115 MHz (not 2401 MHz).. from 0630UTC to 0900 UTC

For the first hour (until 0730UTC) we’ll just have a CW carrier, should
be easy to see.

For the next hour, we’ll be transmitting a JPL ranging code with the
chip rate at 2115/2048 MHz (a bit more than 1 MHz)..
See the 810-005 handbook for details
http://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/dsndocs/810-005/214/214-1.pdf

You can probably see not only the carrier but the +/-1 MHz ranging tones
(and probably at +/-2 MHz, too), and also the PN sequence if you’ve got
enough SNR (or post process.. the code period is about 1 second.. it’s
about a million chips long)

Then, at 0830UTC we’ll stop using the PN ranging, and go to Doppler
compensating the uplink so that the received signal at JPL will have
zero Doppler.

This is all “we hope”.. it’s experimental and a sort of procedural shake
out as well as giving me a chance to test my ground copy of a Software
Defined Radio that is flying on ISS.

[ANS thanks Jim Lux, W6RMK for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-053

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* ARISS School Proposal Window for the United States is now Open
* Amateur Radios on ISS to be off in support of upcoming spacewalks
* SSTV Activity from the ISS is scheduled February 22-23 – Update
* Astronaut Ham Renews License, Plus Four New Astronaut Hams
* John Grunsfeld, KC5ZTF, named to Astronaut Hall of Fame
* JPL Plans 2401 MHz Lunar Ranging Experiment March 3
* New Educational Materials Available at NASA.gov
* Design The Next AMSAT Satellite!
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over
SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-053.01
ANS-053 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 053.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE February 22, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-053.01
ARISS School Proposal Window for the United States is now Open

February 17, 2015 – ARISS is now accepting proposals for U.S. schools
wishing to schedule contacts between their students and the
International Space Station for the next cycle. Details on
submitting proposals can be found below in the attached ARRL News
Release.

Message to US Educators

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station

Contact Opportunity

Call for Proposals
Proposal Window February 15 – April 15, 2015

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program
is seeking formal and informal education institutions and
organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates
that the contact would be held between *January 1, 2016 and June 30,
2016*. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact
contact dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS
is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of
participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
education plan.

The deadline to submit a proposal is April 15, 2015.
Proposal information and documents can be found at
www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate
in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are
approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students and educators
to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via
Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space
station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford
education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from
astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn
about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an
opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless
technology, and radio science. Because of the nature of human
spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the
ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate
changes in contact dates and times.

Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space
agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this educational
opportunity by providing the equipment and operational support to
enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and students
around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program is managed
by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and ARRL (American
Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA.

More Information

Interested parties can find more information about the program at
www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations,
proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of
Information Sessions go to www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.
Please direct any questions to ariss@arrl.org.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]
———————————————————————
Amateur radios on ISS to be off in support of upcoming spacewalks

Astronauts Wilmore, Virts and Cristoforetti will be performing three
spacewalks over the next few weeks and will impact some of the
amateur radio operations on the International Space Station (ISS).
Spacewalks have been scheduled for February 21, 24 and March 1 and
will have the amateur radios turned off to assure the safety of the
crewmembers working outside of the ISS. The first spacewalk is now
set to begin Saturday at 7:10 a.m. EST with NASA TV live coverage
starting at 6 a.m. The second and third spacewalks are planned for
Feb. 25 and March 1, both beginning at 7:10 a.m.

The announcement can be reviewed:
http://tinyurl.com/ANS053-EVA-Schedule

The series of spacewalks will prepare cables and communications gear
for new docking ports that will allow future crews launched from
Florida on U.S. commercial spacecraft to dock to the space station.
The spacewalks will be the 185th, 186th and 187th in support of space
station assembly and maintenance.

There is always a possibility that the schedule for the EVAs could
change. The amateur radios will be turned off to accommodate any
adjustments to the EVA schedule.

[ANS thanks NASA, Kenneth – N5VHO for the above information]
———————————————————————
SSTV Activity from the ISS is scheduled February 22-23 – Update

Continuous SSTV transmission was planned from Saturday 21 February
at about 10.00 UTC till Monday 23 February 21.30 UTC.

Due to onboard activities, the transmission is differed.
It will *possibly* take place beginning Sunday February 22 after
10:00 UTC and end Monday February 23 at the crew’s sleep time.

It is expected that 12 different photos will be sent on 145.800 MHz
FM, using the SSTV mode PD180, with 3 minutes off periods between
transmissions.

One of the photos will show the commemorative diploma created by
PZK, the national Polish Amateur Radio society, on the occasion of
the 80th anniversary of the birth of first cosmonaut J.A.Gagarine.
More about this diploma in due time.

The equipment used will be the Kenwood D710 transceiver located in
the Russian Service Module.

The pictures to be downlinked will be Series 1 images allowing the
world-wide community of hams and schools to receive previously sent
pictures, but replacing one with new additional image added specially
for this event.

The transmit frequency will be 145.800 MHz.

Received images can be uploaded to the ARISS Image gallery found at
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

The ARISS team is developing plans for transmitting new images to
space enthusiasts around the world in upcoming months.

*Editor’s note: Adjustments to the the proposed EVAs mentioned in
the previous story could have an impact on the above schedule.

[ANS thanks Gaston, ON4WF, for the above information]
———————————————————————
Astronaut Ham Renews License, Plus Four New Astronaut Hams

Michael Fincke, KE5AIT recently renewed his Amateur Radio license
through February 18, 2025. Fincke served on Expedition 9 (April 18 to
October 23, 2004), Expedition 18 (October 12, 2008 to April 8, 2009),
and STS-134 (May 16 to June 1, 2011). He currently holds the American
record for the most time in space, 381.6 days.

Fincke’s biography can be viewed at:
http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/fincke.html

Four astronauts recently passed their Technician Class license exams.

Thomas Pesquet, KG5FYG
Jack Fischer, KG5FYH
David Saint-Jacques, KG5FYI
Kathleen Rubins, PHD., KG5FYJ

Pesquet was selected as an ESA astronaut in May 2009. He joined ESA
in September 2009 and completed basic training in November 2010. He
will be leaving our planet for six months November 2016 as a flight
engineer for Expeditions 50 and 51, returning in May 2017.

Pesquet’s biography can be viewed at:
http://tinyurl.com/ANS053-Thomas-Pesquet-Bio

Fischer was selected in July 2009 as a member of the 20th NASA
astronaut class. He completed astronaut candidate training in July
2011.

Fischer’s biography can be viewed at:
http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/fischer-jack.html

Saint-Jacques was selected in May 2009 by the Canadian Space Agency
(CSA) and has moved to Houston to be one of 14 members of the 20th
NASA astronaut class.

Saint-Jacques’ biography can be viewed at:
http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/astronauts/biosaintjacques.asp

Dr. Rubins was selected in July 2009 as 1 of 14 members of NASA
Astronaut Group 20. She has been selected as flight engineer-2 for
ISS Expedition 48/49 launching on Soyuz TMA-20M in May 2016

Dr. Rubins’ biography can be viewed at:
http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/rubins-k.html

[ANS thanks Kenneth N5VHO, NASA, ESA and CSA for the above
information]
———————————————————————
John Grunsfeld, KC5ZTF, named to Astronaut Hall of Fame

Astronaut and Amateur Radio operator John Grunsfeld, KC5ZTF, will be
installed into the Astronaut Hall of Fame in May of 2015, along with
Rhea Seddon, Steven Lindsey, and Kent Rominger. They join the likes
of previous inductees including Alan Shepard, Neil Armstrong, and
John Young in a ceremony on May 30 at Kennedy Space Center’s Visitor
Complex (KSCVC).

Each year the selection process is managed by the Foundation, and
inductees are selected from a pool of nominations, with the finalists
selected by a panel of Hall of Fame astronauts, NASA leaders, flight
directors, historians and journalists.

According to Collect Space, “To be eligible, astronauts must be U.S
citizens and have made their first spaceflight at least 17 years
prior to their induction year. In addition, nominees need to be a
NASA-trained commander, pilot or mission specialist who orbited the
Earth at least once.”

The 2015 inductees are the 14th class, and combined the group has
flown a total of 18 shuttle missions over 26 years. With the addition
of this year’s inductees, the total number of astronauts admitted to
the Hall of Fame will be 91.

John Grunsfeld, KC5ZTF, current NASA associate administrator for
science, is a veteran of five spaceflights, and logged over 58 days
in space with 60 hours of EVA time spread over eight different
spacewalks.

First flying in 1995 as part of STS-67, a dedicated astronomy
mission, Grunsfeld served as a mission specialist. Launching from
Kennedy Space Center aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, STS-67 was
the second on three flights for the Astro 2 observatory — an
ultraviolet telescope. During this record-setting 16-day mission,
the crew conducted ’round the clock observations of faint
astronomical objects as well as the polarization of UV light from
distant galaxies.

His second flight, STS-81 was the fifth shuttle flight to dock with
the Mir space station. Launching aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis,
Grunsfeld served as a flight engineer during this ten day mission.

His next three flights, STS-103, STS-109, STS-125 would be servicing
missions to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Over the course of
these three mission, and several spacewalks, Grunsfeld helped upgrade
and install new cameras, such as the wide-field camera on the
telescope, ensuring it would be functional for years to come. His
final flight was also the final flight to Hubble.

During his last spacewalk, Grunsfeld said this about the mission,
“We’ve been on a tremendous adventure, and been a part of a
challenging mission. Hubble isn’t just another satellite, it’s
humanity’s quest for knowledge.”

When asked about his experience as an astronaut and what it felt
like to be nominated, Grunsfeld said, “The biggest honor is to be an
astronaut. It is such a tremendous privilege to be able to represent
humankind in our efforts to explore space.”

[ANS thanks Spaceflight Insider for the above information]
———————————————————————
JPL Plans 2401 MHz Lunar Ranging Experiment March 3

NASA Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) will transmit a narrow band signal at
about 2041 MHz illuminating a spot on the moon (probably centered on
Tycho) about 1000km in diameter early in the morning of 3 March
between about 0630 to 0900 UTC.

JPL will be transmitting about 20kW from a 34 m aperture. They are
planning to have three distinct transmission modes, two will be a CW
carrier, and a third mode including a PN ranging code on the signal,
probably changing every 45 minutes.

The signal should be easy to detect with even a small receive
antenna (at least the narrow band signal).

If you have a wideband recorder, the ranging code should be easy to
recover with post processing. Standard ranging code as defined in 810-
005

http://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/dsndocs/810-005/214/214-1.pdf

As with all PN ranging done by the Deep Space Network, the PN code
rate is coherent to the transmit carrier, probably 1.9931640625 MHz
(or half that) in this case.

The current status of the NASA Deep Space Network is displayed
online at:
http://eyes.nasa.gov/dsn/dsn.html

[ANS thanks Jim Lux via amateur-DSN@yahoogroups.com for the above
information]
———————————————————————
New Educational Materials Available at NASA.gov

Are you looking for a lesson plan that combines mathematics and
space science? Do you need a set of images of objects in our solar
system? Or maybe you’re hunting for hands-on engineering projects to
challenge your students. NASA Education has you covered!

The following items are now available for downloading.

NASA Education Brochure — All Educators
NASA Education has a vision to advance science, technology,
engineering and mathematics education using NASA’s unique
capabilities. This brochure explains the four initiatives for
achieving that vision. Learn how you can get involved.
http://tinyurl.com/ANS053-NASA-Education-Brochure

Space Math VIII Educator Guide – Grades 5-12
Students apply problem-solving, algebra, geometry or trigonometry
skills to a selection of 49 real-world problems involving Earth and
space science. Each word problem includes background information. One-
page teachers’ answer keys accompany the one-page assignments.
http://tinyurl.com/ANS053-Space-Math

Space Math IX Educator Guide — Grades 5-12
This collection of activities is intended for students looking for
additional challenges in the mathematics and physical science
curriculum.
The subjects of the problems include spacecraft, rovers and
meteorites. Mathematical topics include algebra, geometry and
calculus. Each word problem has background information. One-page
teachers’ answer keys accompany the one-page assignments.
http://tinyurl.com/ANS053-Space-Math-IX

Our Solar System Lithograph Set — All Grade Levels
This lithograph set features images of the planets, sun, asteroids,
comets, meteors and meteorites, the Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud, and
moons of the solar system. General information, significant dates,
interesting facts and brief descriptions of the images are included.
http://tinyurl.com/ANS053-Solar-System-Lithograph

NASA’s BEST Next Generation Activity Guide – Technology Demonstration
Missions – Grades 5-8
This activity guide includes nine hands-on engineering projects
focusing on the engineering design process and real-world science,
technology and mathematics.
http://tinyurl.com/ANS053-Tech-Demo

Year of the Solar System — Real World Math — Grades 6-12
This collection of activities allows students to use mathematical
concepts from fractions to calculus as they learn about asteroids,
comets, planets, craters, planetary rings and many more space science
topics.
http://tinyurl.com/ANS053-Real-World-Math

Looking for more?
NASA’s new Educational Resource Search Tool can help you find lesson
plans, posters, educator guides and other materials to supplement
your science, technology, engineering and mathematics curriculum.
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and
keywords.

To check out the new search tool and begin your educational resource
hunt, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education/materials/

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message — Feb. 19, 2015 for the
above information]
———————————————————————
Design The Next AMSAT Satellite!

At the 2014 AMSAT Space Symposium AMSAT Vice President – Engineering
Jerry Buxton announced the plan for the next generation of AMSAT
satellites. “The door is open for everyone, to submit their ideas.
AMSAT Engineering has a long term strategy and this is the first
step.”

The Engineering long term strategy includes the following goals

* Advancement of amateur radio satellite technical and communications
skills
* Enhance international goodwill
* Grow and sustain a skilled pool of amateur radio satellite engineers
* Establish and maintain partnerships with educational institutions
* Develop a means to use hardware common to all opportunities

With respect to the last goal Jerry said “Within the bounds of the
type of satellite it takes to achieve any of the various orbit
opportunities, let’s consider in those plans the possibility of
developing a platform that can suit any and all orbits. Perhaps a
modular CubeSat, using a common bus as we did in Fox-1, which gives
great flexibility in building and flying different sizes and
configurations of CubeSats with simple common-design hardware
changes.”

Submissions should be thorough and contain the following
information. The purpose of the proposal is not just in suggesting
an idea; being an all-volunteer team AMSAT needs your help in
carrying out the idea.

Design
Implementation – CubeSat platform
Estimated timeline
Cost – volunteer resources, commercial (COTS) units
Launch – how does it get to orbit
Strategy – how it fits into AMSAT’s Engineering long term strategy
As mentioned above the idea should be based on the CubeSat platform.
This is the standard through which we will look for launches in the
foreseeable future.

In considering your proposal, Jerry encourages you to contact him,
(n0jy@amsat.org using Subject: Design the Next AMSAT Satelleite), for
more details on the criteria.

A guidebook to the criteria is now available for download at

http://tinyurl.com/ANS032-SatelliteGuide.

In particular, if you plan to include a university as a partner to
provide experiments or other support and you are not representing
that university, please contact Jerry for assistance in working with
our existing partners or establishing a new partnership.

“Being amateur radio operators, it is easy for us to fall into a
particular trap because of our history of communicating with other
amateurs throughout the world” says Jerry. “Specifically, most people
who are not already involved in the world of satellite technology are
unaware of or simply overlook the provisions of the current ITAR and
soon to be EAR export rules particularly with regard to deemed
exports which requires governmental permission to discuss satellite
projects with foreign nationals.”

While all amateurs are invited to submit ideas, U.S. amateurs must
take particular care of they choose to become involved in a
collaboration which includes individuals from other countries. It is
permissible to receive ideas and proposals from outside the U.S., but
it is not permitted for U.S. Persons to export or share design ideas
with other countries unless they have taken the proper steps to
insure compliance with ITAR and deemed export rules.

Additionally, those wishing to work on proposals should use care in
presenting themselves in their contacts. While the goal is for AMSAT
to build and launch the satellite, it is not an AMSAT project until
it is accepted by the AMSAT Board of Directors. It is acceptable to
represent yourself as members of a project team that plans to submit
a proposal to AMSAT for a future satellite project, as the AMSAT name
is well known.

“It is not our intention that ideas be submitted to AMSAT-NA which
would be more appropriately handled by an AMSAT organization in a
country where AMSAT is established. AMSAT-NA is seeking ideas from
amateurs in North America and will certainly consider ideas from
amateurs in countries which do not have an established AMSAT
organization or relationships with an existing AMSAT organization.”

The deadline for submissions is May 30, 2015. After the submission
date the ideas will be screened for completeness and then reviewed by
a board consisting of the AMSAT Engineering Team, AMSAT Senior
Officer and Board of Directors representatives, and aerospace
industry members. The review board may modify or consolidate ideas
and will consider which meet the criteria to become a project based
on feasibility, cost, and the ability to bring value to the amateur
satellite community. The review process is expected to be completed
in September 2015.

For those ideas selected to become a project which satisfy the
requirements for an ELaNa launch, the idea authors will be asked to
work with the AMSAT Engineering Team on an ELaNa proposal.

The Engineering Team will then work on the details of execution for
the selected project(s) and present a proposal to the AMSAT Board of
Directors in October 2015 for final approval to begin work. Once
approved, any ELaNa proposals will be submitted in November 2015 and
the project(s) will move forward.

Now is the time for YOU to begin working on the next AMSAT satellite!

[ANS thanks AMSAT Engineering for the above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between Scuola Secondaria di Primo
Grado “Bachelet”, Cernusco sul naviglio, Italy and Astronaut Samantha
Cristoforetti IZØUDF using callsign NA1SS. The contact began 2015-02-
05 10:37 UTC and lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was
telebridged via W6SRJ. ARISS Mentor was IZ2GOJ.

+ A Successful contact was made between Scuola Media Locatelli-
Oriani, Milano, Italy and Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF
using callsign NA1SS. The contact began 2015-02-05 10:37 UTC and
lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was telebridged via
W6SRJ. ARISS Mentor was IZ2GOJ.

+ A Successful contact was made between W.T. Sampson (DoD school),
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF
using callsign IR0ISS. The contact began 2015-02-11 15:58 UTC and
lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was telebridged via
IK1SLD. ARISS Mentor was AA4KN.

+ A Successful contact was made between Council Rock High School-
South, Holland, PA and Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF using
Callsign NA1SS. The contact began 2015-02-19 18:18:27 UTC and lasted
about nine and a half minutes. Contact was direct via K3DN.
ARISS Mentor was KB9UPS.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

An ARISS contact is planned with Riversink Elementary School,
Crawfordville, FL. The contact will be direct via K4WAK The ISS
callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS The scheduled astronaut
is Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF
Contact is scheduled for: Wed 2015-02-25 16:09:15 UTC

The contact should be audible over the eastern U.S and adjacent
areas. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.80 MHz
downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted in English.

Riversink Elementary School is a K-5 public school operating within
the Wakulla County School District. It is a Title I school located
in rural Crawfordville, Florida. Riversink first opened its doors in
August of 2008. Teachers at Riversink believe that every student
will reach his or her highest potential in a positive learning
environment that encourages students to be respectful, responsible,
and ready to learn. Students at Riversink are highly successful due,
in part, to the collaborative efforts of the faculty and staff, along
with strong parental support. The student body is made up of 470
students. The school has 37 teachers. Riversink’s mission is to
facilitate the development of all students to their fullest potential
by providing research-based instructional strategies and promoting a
love of learning and community pride in a safe, positive
environment.

A team of science and technology students and their teachers from
Council Rock South High School, Richboro, PA will be speaking
directly with astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) as
it flies over the Philadelphia area. A group of experienced
operators from the Warminster Amateur Radio Club will be at the
school to assist the teachers and students as they use Ham Radio
technology to make the contact.

The school will be using a recently donated radio system and
antennas to participate in the ARISS program (Amateur Radio on the
International Space Station) in which students talk directly with the
astronauts and ask questions about living in space while the
astronauts are actually there.

Science teachers Jerry Fetter and Jeff Warmkessel have been with
NASA’s NEAT program (Network of Educator-Astronaut Teachers) since
2004 and got the idea of applying to the ARISS program when Fetter’s
Astronomy classes were talking about living in space. “They kept
asking questions which only astronauts would know how to answers”,
said Fetter. “I remember thinking how great it would be if we could
just ask them directly. To be able to ask the astronauts while they
fly overhead is beyond my wildest plans!”

Students in various STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
programs at Council Rock South High School have spent time
considering which questions are important enough to ask an astronaut
in the short amount of time available (approximately 12 minutes) as
the ISS’s flight path crosses over the area.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time
allows:

1. Dominic (5): When you come back to Earth after being on the ISS,
are you able to walk or does it take time to get used to it?
2. Kyle (4): Are there laws in space?
3. Amelia (3): Other than floating, how is living in space
different than living on the earth?
4. Brooks (2): How far have you traveled around the earth?
5. Makayla (1): How do you get to be an astronaut?
6. Jabari (K): What can you do in your free time on the space
station?
7. Addison (K): How do you sleep in space?
8. Hannah (1): How long does it take to get to the ISS?
9. Chace (2): How do you power the ISS?
10. Payton (3): Has the space station ever been hit or almost hit by
anything?
11. Jasmine (4): What happens if you get sick in space?
12. Harley (5): When you sweat on the space station, does it stick
to your body or does it float away?
13. Dominic (5): What has been the most memorable moment you’ve had
as an astronaut?
14. Kyle (4): What time zone do you use in space?
15. Amelia (3): What kind of work are you doing on the space station?
16. Brooks (2): What is it like to exercise on the space station?
17. Makayla (1): How do you eat in space?
18. Jabari (K) How does the space station move?
19. Addison (K): What do you miss the most about being on Earth?
20. Hannah (1): What belongings can you take with you to the space
station?
21. Chace (2): What kinds of experiments are you working on?
22. Payton (3): When you grow plants in space, how do you water them?
23. Jasmine (4): How do you communicate with your family?
24. Harley (5): How does it feel to be the first Italian woman in
space?

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]
———————————————————————
Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Hams in Space

Since the earliest days of the Space Shuttle, many astronauts have
become licensed radio amateurs to communicate to stations on earth
while traveling in space and on the International Space Station.

For a list of astronauts who hold or have held an amateur radio
license visit
http://www.ariss.org/hams-in-space.html

+ The January/February 2015 AMSAT Journal has been mailed. Look for
your copy if you haven’t already received it.

+ Dayton will host the 2015 AMSAT Space Symposium October 16-18 at
the Crowne Plaza in downtown Dayton. More information will be
posted on the AMSAT website www.amsat.org as it becomes available.

+ A great Russian 435-438 MHz WebSDR with labels for satellite
frequencies is now available on line at: http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

+ Need a 2015 calendar? How about one with out-of-this-world images?
Download the ?#?ISS calendar here:

http://tinyurl.com/ANS053-Calendar

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-046

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Help Wanted: AMSAT Engineering Kicking Off Ground Station Development
* More ISS Slow Scan TV Activity
* Fox-1 Continues Preparation for Launch
* Navassa K1N Dxpedition Active on FO-29
* AMSAT Orlando Hamcation Report

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-046.01
ANS-046 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 046.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
February 15, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-046.01

Help Wanted: AMSAT Engineering Kicking Off Ground Station Development

AMSAT Engineering is looking for hams interested in developing ground
station equipment for future satellites. An inexpensive L-Band uplink
converter is something that is of interest right now for LEO satellites as
part of the recently approved technology funding.

If you are interested in helping, please contact AMSAT Engineering by
completing the form on the website to tell Jerry Buxton, N0JY, the Vice
President of Engineering, how you can volunteer your time and skills to help
AMSAT engineering build satellites and other required hardware/software.

To volunteer please visit:
http://ww2.amsat.org/?page_id=1121

[ANS thanks AMSAT Vice President Engineering, Jerry Buxton, N0JY for the
above information]

———————————————————————

More ISS Slow Scan TV Activity

The Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) has announced another round of
amateur radio Slow Scan Television (SSTV) activity from the International Space
Station (ISS) will take place later this month. Continuous operation, using the
call sign RS0ISS, is expected from 1000 UT on Saturday, February 21 until 2130
UT on Monday, February 23.

Twelve different images depicting space pioneer Yuri Gagarin — the first human
to orbit Earth — will be sent on 145.800 MHz FM using the SSTV mode PD180, with
a 3-minute off time between transmissions.

The equipment used will be the Kenwood D710 transceiver located in the Russian
Service Module. It is thought the equipment may be producing about 25 watts
output which should provide a very strong signal.

Plans are being discussed for transmitting new images from space enthusiasts
around the world in the coming months. Additional details will be released.

The images received by amateurs world-wide during previous transmissions can be
seen at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/ and you are invited to
upload any pictures you receive during the upcoming transmissions.

All you need to do to receive SSTV pictures direct from the space station is to
connect the audio output of a scanner or amateur radio transceiver via a simple
interface to the soundcard on a Windows PC or an Apple iOS device, and tune in
to 145.800 MHz FM. You can even receive pictures by holding an iPhone next to
the radio loudspeaker.

On Windows PC’s the free application MMSSTV can be used to decode the signal, on
Apple iOS devices you can use the SSTV app for compatible modes.

The ISS puts out a strong signal on 145.800 MHz FM and a 2m handheld with a 1/4
wave antenna will be enough to receive it. The FM transmission uses the 5 kHz
deviation which is standard in much of the world.

Paul Turner G4IJE, co-developer of the SSTV PD modes, says regarding the MMSSTV
PD180 mode: “Don’t forget to either enable “Always show RX viewer” or use the
“Picture viewer” (magnifying glass icon) to show the picture at its real
resolution of 640 x 496. If you just view as normal you will only see 320 x 248
resolution, which kind of defeats the object of using a high resolution mode.”

Many more tips and links for various receiving options are available at
http://amsat-uk.org/2015/02/11/more-iss-slow-scan-tv/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Fox-1 Continues Preparation for Launch

Following the successful conclusion of vibration and thermal/vacuum testing
Fox-1 now is stored in a clean environment waiting for launch. However, there is
still work going on behind the scenes.

AMSAT Vice-President Engineering, Jerry Buxton, N0JY says several required
reports are being reviewed by the launch provider. We continue to make necessary
updates if they request further information in order to be sure that all of the
i’s are dotted and the t’s are crossed.  The paperwork is an ongoing full
workload in itself, both during the design and construction and even after Fox-1
was finished.

For the remaining schedule, Fox-1 will have its Mission Readiness Review (MRR)
at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo CA on February 24 by a review board of Cal Poly
and NASA representatives. Next, Fox-1 will be delivered and integrated into the
P-POD at Cal Poly during the week of March 16. Then the countdown begins.

[ANS thanks AMSAT Vice-President Engineering, Jerry Buxton, N0JY for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Navassa K1N Dxpedition Active on FO-29

Thanks to AMSAT, the Navassa Island K1N DXpedition was equipped to work stations
via the FO-29 Amateur Radio satellite. Vice President-Operations Drew
Glasbrenner, KO4MA, said that AMSAT had provided the DXpedition with a Yaesu
FT-817 transceiver and associated equipment to support operation on FO-29’s
linear passband. AMSAT also gave the group pass predictions, an operational
plan, and training. Several reports of successful contacts have been reported
via messages on amsat-bb.

In a message relayed by Mark, K0MDJ, from Glenn, W0GJ, the primary voice on
FO-29 from Navassa reported, “”We have it down now … takes four people: one
antenna guy, one radio guy, one microphone guy, one logger … plus a couple
photographers. Glen also says they hope to be on every pass from now until they
leave, so at least through Saturday.”

The Navassa team logs their contacts using Clublog:
http://www.clublog.org/charts/?c=K1N

If you can make a donation you can find the link on the DXpedition’s web page:
http://www.navassadx.com/

Mike, W4UOO, observed, “A tip of the Hat to Drew … for delivering the gear and
the How-To to some of the K1N team back in January and whatever else he did.
There’s a big thanks in here! What Great Marketing for Satellite operations.
What great fun is being had … all when it seems nearly impossible, suddenly
you’re talking to someone. It’s great to see K1N/Satellite spots going by also!
Love it.”

[ANS thanks the dozens of posts via amsat-bb for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Orlando Hamcation Report

The 2015 Orlando Hamcation – Orlando, FL took place over the weekend of 13-15
Feb at the Central Florida Fairgrounds.

AMSAT was represented all three days with a two booth are in the main commercial
building. At the booth the ARISSat-1 working demo satellite and Fox-1
Engineering model were on display.  The booth also provided a great location for
people stop by and get information from VP of Operations Drew Glasbrenner,
KO4MA, and Dave Jordan, AA4KN.

John Papay, K8YSE,  was operating the sats via his remote and rover stations
along with other satellite demos.

An AMSAT forum was held on Saturday with Board of Directors member Lou McFadin,
K5DID, providing an update on all the on-going AMSAT activities including
upcoming ARISS activities and the Fox-1 series of cubesats.  A special treat for
those attending the forum was a special prize drawing. M2 donated one of their
new 2m/70cm “Leo-Pack” antenna systems which made its debut at Hamcation.

[ANS thanks Dave, AA4KN and the AMSAT Hamcation Team for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-039

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT-UK Colloquium 2015 – Call For Speakers
* Navassa K1N Satellite Operation Supported by AMSAT-NA
* Successful Contact For ESA Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, IZØUDF
With Two Schools In Italy
* AMSAT-BR Forms in Brazil
* AMSAT SKN 2015 BEST FIST WINNERS
* AESP-14 CubeSat Team Requesting Receiving Assistance
* AMSAT at 2015 Orlando Hamcation
* Palm Springs HamFest – March 14
* NASA Announces University CubeSat Space Mission Candidates
* 2015 NASA Academy
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-039.01
ANS-039 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 039.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE February 8, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-039.01

———————————————————————

AMSAT-UK Colloquium 2015 – Call For Speakers

This is the first call for speakers for the AMSAT-UK Colloquium 2015
which will be held from Saturday, July 25 to Sunday, July 26 2015 at
the Holiday Inn, Guildford, GU2 7XZ, United Kingdom.

http://amsat-uk.org/colloquium/colloquium-2015/

AMSAT-UK invites speakers, to cover topics about micro-satellites,
CubeSats, Nanosats, space and associated activities, for this event.

They are also invited to submit papers for subsequent publishing on
the AMSAT-UK web site. We normally prefer authors to present talks
themselves rather than having someone else give them in the authors’
absence. We also welcome “unpresented” papers for the web site.

Submissions should be sent *ONLY* to G4DPZ, via the following routes:
e-mail: dave at g4dpz dot me dot uk
Postal address at http://www.qrz.com/db/G4DPZ

AMSAT-UK also invite anyone with requests for Program Topics to submit
them as soon as possible to G4DPZ. Invitations for any papers on
specific subjects will be included in the future call. Likewise if
anyone knows of a good speaker, please send contact and other
information to G4DPZ.

[ANS thanks Dave, G4DPZ and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Navassa K1N Satellite Operation Supported by AMSAT-NA

AMSAT Vice President Operations, Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA reported on his
work to enable amateur satellite operation via FO-29 by the K1N Navassa
Island DXpedition. To support operation on the linear passband of FO-29,
Drew said AMSAT provided a Yaesu FT-817 radio and associated equipment, pass
predictions, operational plan, and training. Operation in the linear
passband of FO-29 maximizes the number of contacts possible.

The K1N satellite operator is Gregg, W6IZT although others may also
participate. Gregg will be operating half-duplex with the Yaesu FT-817
(provided by AMSAT) and an Arrow antenna. Gregg has pass prediction
information for FO-29 and SO-50, for all passes that are 20 degrees or
higher at the island (thanks to John K8YSE for preparing those). While the
focus will be on FO-29, it is possible they may try SO-50 as well. Gregg
mentioned to Drew that satellite operations are more likely in the second
half of the expedition as opposed to the first half.

Drew described the satellite operating configuration:

+ The radio is programmed with 5 split-band memory channels
for SO-50.

+ The VFOs are programmed for FO-29 operation with a fixed uplink
of 145.980, for a downlink at 435.813 to 435.827 depending on
Doppler shift.

+ IMPORTANT NOTE – Gregg will be tuning his receive for replies,
and may not be listening directly on his own downlink. Calling
while he is transmitting will not work since he is half-duplex.
(This is much the same way other rovers such as KL7R and UT1FG
operate. This particular frequency scheme was chosen to reduce
QRM (both given and received). This also allows a quick tune
to the beacon for antenna pointing when there are not many callers.

+ Two high quality LMR-240UF jumpers to connect directly to the
Arrow antenna via the front and back antenna ports.

In conclusion, Drew said, “Gregg has my email and cell phone number. I have
asked him to alert me if possible, no matter the hour, when they decide to
get on FO-29, which I will pass along to the amsat-bb list and the AMSAT
twitter feed immediately.”

The team is still in need of financial help for the expedition. Please
consider helping them out at:
http://69.89.25.185/~trexsoft/t-rexsoftware.com/k1n/donate.htm

The main Navassa DXpedition website can be viewed at:
http://www.navassadx.com

FO-29 Frequencies
—————–
Uplink Passband:    146.000 – 145.900 MHz   Analog CW/SSB
Downlink Passband:  435.800 – 435.900 MHz   Analog CW/SSB
Beacon:             435.795 MHz

SO-50 Frequencies
—————–
Uplink:   145.850 MHz FM 67.0 Hz CTCSS tone for access
Downlink: 436.795 MHz FM

[ANS thanks Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA for the above information]

———————————————————————

Successful Contact For ESA Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, IZØUDF
With Two Schools In Italy

Saturday, January 31, 2015 at 08:39 UTC, 09:39 local time, students
at “Istituto Salesiano G. Bearzi” in Udine and Intercultura students
at “Centro Giovanno XXIII” in Frascati, Roma, Italy established ARISS
contact with ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, IZØUDF onboard the
International Space Station. These were telebridge contacts performed
by Amateur radio ground stations K6DUE, located in Maryland, USA.

Presentation Istituto Salesiano “G. Bearzi”
Brief description of the school and the amateur radio school club
(if there is one): The school is a salesian school with 750 students,
from 6 to 20 years old. We have also a small hostel for college
students.

Presentation of Intercultura
Intercultura is the Italian representative of AFS Intercultural
Programs (New York, an international, no profit, voluntary based
organization that provides intercultural learning opportunities and
cultural exchange programs throughout more than 60 different
countries in the world, involving every year 13.000 students and an
equivalent number of families and schools. In Italy, Intercultura is
a no profit organization (Onlus) recognized by the Italian
government, under the patronage of the Ministry of Foreign  Affairs.
The professional staff of Intercultura is made by 40 people who work
in the headquarter of Colle Val D’Elsa (Siena) or in the PR offices
based in Milan and Rome. The 4.000 affiliated volunteers are
organized in 150 local chapters and offer voluntary work to promote
international school based exchange programs.

Mentor Francesco De Paolis IK0WGF proposed to the radio coordinators
Mr. Antonio Baldin IW3QKU and Mr. Emanuele D’Andria IØELE the sharing
of event and this was accepted. A phone conference call allowed the
full sharing of the event between two contact sites involved,
moderated by Mr. Peter Kofler, IN3GHZ. The sequence of questions was
made alternately by the students at two contact sites involved.

Contact was established at 08:39 UTC, 09:39 local time with NA1SS
via K6DUE. ESA Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF answered 12
questions by students.

Samantha Cristoforetti was really very accurate in giving the
answers and full of details. Signals from the ISS were good during
both ISS passes, but suffering a few moments of fading.

Regional and Local Televisions and newspapers covered the event.
About 500 students, parents, visitors and media attended the events
at contact sites.

After the contact, Mrs. Rosa Tagliamonte and Mr. Salvatore
Pignataro by ASI (Italian Space Agency) presented Cristoforetti
mission and Italian contribution to International Space Station. Mr.
Emanule D’Andria IØELE presented ARISS and explained how a contact
with the ISS is performed via Ham Radio.

The contact established with NA1SS was live on AMSAT Italia channel:
http://www.livestream.com/amsat_italia

The event was announced on ESA Portal – National News:
http://www.esa.int/ita/ESA_in_your_country/Italy/Un_saluto_dalla_Terr
a_in_tutte_le_lingue_del_mondo._Samantha_Cristoforetti_parla_con_gli_s
tudenti_di_Intercultura_e_di_Udine

Congratulations to IW3QKU and IØELE Teams!

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT-BR Forms in Brazil

A new AMSAT group, AMSAT-BR, has been formed in Brazil in order to better
organize the Brazilian amateur satellite activities, to better represent the
amateur radio community to organizations developing cubesat projects, and to
attract more amateurs in different regions of the country to join our cause.
AMSAT-BR has formed as a special interest group under the Liga de Amadores
Brasileiros de Radio Emissão (LABRE), the national organization with the
mission to represent the amateur radio community in Brazil. LABRE is
registered as a member society of the International Amateur Radio Union
(IARU).

Orlando Perez Filho, PT2OP, the Executive Director of LABRE sent a letter to
AMSAT-NA in which he described the primary mission of AMSAT-BR will be:

+ To foster activities related to development, building,
operating, and monitoring amateur radio satellites and
high altitude balloons.

+ To foster activities using amateur radio satellites and
high altitude balloons in STEM education.

Mr. Filho noted that collaboration with cubesat projects in Brazil gave
LABRE the opportunity to learn more about their missions and opened doors to
show them that there were some needs for better alignment with the amateur
radio service objectives and at the same time demonstrate that there are
benefits for them to get involved with the amateur radio community. LABRE
volunteered to assist some projects with the IARU frequency coordination
applications leading to cubesats with significant amateur radio involvement:

+ AESP-14: A 1U educational cubesat launched to the ISS in January
and deployed on February 5, 2015. The AESP-14 primary mission is
to test a cubesat structure, power system, and OBC developed
locally by space systems engineering students in Brazil. The
project includes an amateur radio experiment in the form of
reception contest where pre-defined text strings will be stored
on board the spacecraft and will be randomly transmitted. The
experiment was conceptualized by PY2DGS, PY2ADN, PY2JF, PY2NI,
PY2UEP, and PY2SDR.

+ NCBR1: A 1U scientific cubesat using the ISIS structure and
electronics. Amateurs have assisted the project with the reception
and monitoring. It is being contemplated a closer collaboration
with the amateur radio community for the next project (NCBR2). It
is hoped that NCBR2 will include an amateur radio experiment. The
main collaborators with the project are PV8DX, PY4ZBZ and PY2SDR.

+ ITASAT-1: A 6U educational cubesat being developed by engineering
students at the Aeronautics Technology Institute (ITA). The cubesat
will include a short text messaging store-and-forward transponder
being developed by amateurs. Amateurs are also working with some
high schools to use the satellite in STEM education. The experi-
ment is being developed by PY2UEP, and PY2SDR.

+ 14BISat: A 2U educational cubesat being developed by engineering
students at Fluminense Federal Technology Institute in Rio de
Janeiro. PV8DX has been collaborating with the project with the
design and implementation of ground stations that will be
deployed to other educational institutes around the country.

+ AESP-16: A 1U educational cubesat being considered for 2016.
Amateurs have been offered to include an amateur radio payload (TBD).

An additional, welcome outcome of the ongoing collaboration is that some
students have already become interested in amateur radio and have obtained
their amateur radio license. Some projects are even requiring that students
that will operate the station get their amateur radio license as a
prerequisite for participating in the project.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-BR and AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT SKN 2015 BEST FIST WINNERS

Many thanks to all who participated in AMSAT’s Straight Key Night on
OSCAR 2015, this year’s event held in memory of Captain Charles
(Chuck) Dorian, U.S. Coast Guard (Retired), W3JPT.

Activity was good despite the loss of VO-52.  Our thanks to Jim
Heck, G3WGV, and AMSAT-UK for keeping AO-73 in transponder mode
during AMSAT SKN.  AO-73 proved to be quite popular.

The following participants each received at least one Best Fist
nomination from someone they worked:

AA5PK, JA1VVH, JA3PXH, JL1SAM, JM1LRA, JR0EFE, K9CIS, KT0F, N3TE,
N5AFV, WA6ARA, WB5KBH, XE3ARV

Congratulations to all!

We hope you will participate in AMSAT SKN on OSCAR 2016, which will
mark the 25th year that AMSAT has sponsored this fun event.

[ANS thanks Ray, W2RS for the above information]

———————————————————————

AESP-14 CubeSat Team Requesting Receiving Assistance

On Thursday, February 5 the Brazilian satellite AESP-14 was deployed from
the International Space Station (ISS) but so far no signals have been heard.
The AESP-14 telemetry beacon has a power output of 500 mW and uses AX.25 on
437.600 MHz with 9600 bps GMSK modulation (G3RUH standard). It should have
started transmitting 30 minutes after deployment but as of Thursday night
nothing had been heard. It may be the battery did not survive several months
without being recharged or the antenna may have failed to deploy.

The AESP-14 team would like to ask the help of radio amateurs around the
world to forward any received telemetry frames back to the team. For this,
please save the AX.25 frames in KISS format and forward the file to
aesp14@ita.br. The satellite was sent to the ISS as cargo on the SpaceX
Falcon 9 mission CRS-5. Launch had been scheduled for December 16, 2014 but
was postponed three times and it wasn’t until January 10, 2015 that the
launch eventually took place. Since arriving at the ISS on January 12
AESP-14 has been awaiting deployment by the JEM Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD)
which is in the Japanese Kibo module.

The satellite has an amateur radio experiment developed by the Americana
Amateur Radio Club (CRAM). The experiment consists of the random
transmission of 100 sequences of ASCII characters prefixed with the “CRAM”
word that will used as part of a contest among receiving stations. The first
10 amateur radio stations that complete receiving the 100 sequences will be
awarded a commemorative diploma.
Further details at
http://wabicafe.com.br/aesp14/cram.php

AESP-14 website
http://www.aer.ita.br/~aesp14

[ANS thanks the AESP-14 Team and the Southgate ARC for the above
information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT at 2015 Orlando Hamcation

The 2015 Orlando Hamcation – Orlando, FL is scheduled for Friday, February 13
through Sunday, February 15 at the Central Florida Fairgrounds, 4603 West
Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32808.

AMSAT will be represented all three days at two adjacent booths in the
Commercial 1 main entrance building. John Papay, K8YSE will be on hand
operating the sats via his remote and rover stations along with other satellite
demos. The ARISSat-1 working demo satellite will be on display along with the
Fox-1 Engineering model.

There will be an AMSAT forum held on Saturday from 12:30 till 1:30 ending with
a prize drawing for those attending. Hamcation just gets bigger and better
every year, so please join us for a great weekend.

[ANS thanks Dave, AA4KN and the AMSAT Hamcation Team for the above information]

———————————————————————

Palm Springs HamFest – March 14

The 2015 Palm Springs Hamfest will once again be held at the
beautiful Palm Springs Pavilion, near the Palm Springs Baseball
Stadium, Saturday, March 14 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. This year’s
hamfest will offer a VE testing session before the opening of the
regular event.

Admission: Still just $5 – with free parking available.
Where else can you get a day’s worth of entertainment for that?

Forums include …

• Keynote by Gordon West
• Andre Hansen presents on Broadband Hamnet
• Dennis Kidder (“Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio”) will talk
about Maker Faire
• Clint Bradford will present “How to Work the Amateur Satellites
with your HT”
• Bob Brehm, Chief Engineer at Palomar Engineers will present on
curing RFI, working more DX and keeping your neighbors happy

Visit the event’s Web site at …

http://www.palmspringshamfest.com

[ANS thanks Clint, K6LCS for the above information]

———————————————————————

NASA Announces University CubeSat Space Mission Candidates

NASA has selected more than dozen small research satellites that each could
fit in the palm of your hand to fly in space on future rocket launches.

These cube-shaped nanosatellites, called CubeSats, which measure about four
inches on each side and weigh less than three pounds, are small but pack an
outsized research punch. They will enable unique technology demonstrations,
education research and science missions, and will study topics ranging from
how the solar system formed to the demonstration of a new radiation-tolerant
computer system.

The 14 CubeSats selected are from 12 states and will fly as auxiliary
payloads aboard rockets planned to launch in 2016, 2017 and 2018. They come
from universities across the country, non-profit organizations and NASA
field centers.

As part of the White House Maker Initiative, NASA is seeking to leverage the
growing community of space-enthusiasts to create a nation that contributes
to NASA’s space exploration goals. In the first step to broaden this
successful initiative to launch 50 small satellites from all 50 states in
the next five years, the agency has made a selection from West Virginia, one
of the 21 “rookie states” that have not previously been selected by the
CubeSat Launch Initiative.

The selections are part of the fifth round of the agency’s CubeSat Launch
Initiative. The selected spacecraft are eligible for placement on a launch
manifest after final negotiations, depending on the availability of a flight
opportunity. The organizations sponsoring satellites are:

+ Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona
Asteroid Origins Satellite is a science laboratory that will be the world’s
first CubeSat centrifuge. It will enable a unique set of science and
technology experiments to be performed on a CubeSat to answer fundamental
questions of how the solar system formed and understand the surface dynamics
of asteroids and comets.

+ California State University, Northridge, California
The mission of California State University Northridge Satellite is to test
an innovative low temperature capable energy storage system in space
developed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena that will enable
future missions, especially those in deep space to do more science while
requiring less energy, mass and volume.

+ Capitol Technology University, Laurel, Maryland
The Coordinated Applied Capitol Technology University Satellite (CACTUS-1)
is a technological demonstration of a cost-saving communications and
commanding innovation. The payload will lower investment in communications
and ground systems technology by licensing conventional internet satellite
providers for low earth orbit use. The CubeSat’s aerogel-based Particle
Capture and Measurement instrument is the first CubeSat-based orbital debris
detector to be flown in low-Earth orbit.

+ Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
The Temporal Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems – Demonstrator
(TEMPEST-D) provides risk mitigation for the TEMPEST mission that will
provide the first temporal observations of cloud and precipitation processes
on a global scale. These observations are important to understand the
linkages in and between Earth’s water and energy balance, as well as to
improve our understanding of cloud model microphysical processes that are
vital to climate change prediction.

+ Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
KickSat-2 is a CubeSat technology demonstration mission designed to
demonstrate the deployment and operation of prototype Sprite “ChipSats”
(femtosatellites). The Sprite is a tiny spacecraft that includes power,
sensor and communication systems on a printed circuit board measuring 3.5 by
3.5 centimeters with a thickness of a few millimeters and a mass of a few
grams. ChipSats could enable new kinds of science and exploration missions,
as well as dramatically lower the cost of access to space.

+ Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana
A Satellite Demonstration of a Radiation Tolerant System, RadSat, is a
technology demonstration of a new radiation tolerant computer system in a
low-Earth orbit satellite mission to demonstrate a technology readiness
level 9 of the technology.

+ NASA’s Glenn Research Center, Cleveland
The Advanced eLectrical Bus (ALBus) CubeSat is a technology demonstration
mission of an advanced, digitally controlled electrical power system
capability and novel use of shape memory alloy technology for reliable
deployable solar array mechanisms. The goals of the mission are to
demonstrate efficient battery charging in the orbital environment, 100 Watt
distribution to a target electrical load, flexible power system distribution
interfaces, adaptation of power system control on orbit and successful
deployment of solar arrays and antennas using resettable shape memory alloy
mechanisms.

+ NASA’s Independent Verification &Validation Program, Fairmont, West
Virginia
In partnership with the University of West Virginia, the
Simulation-to-Flight 1 (STF-1) mission will demonstrate the utility of the
NASA Operational Simulator technologies across the CubeSat development
cycle, from concept planning to mission operations. It will demonstrate a
highly portable simulation and test platform that allows seamless transition
of mission development artifacts to flight products.

+ Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio
The CubeSat mission to study Solar Particles over the Earth’s Poles (CuSPP)
mission is space weather mission that will study the sources and
acceleration mechanisms of solar and interplanetary particles near-Earth
orbit. It will study magnetospheric ion precipitation in the high-latitude
ionosphere.  It will increase the technology readiness level of a
supra-thermal ion spectrograph concept so that it may fly with reduced risk
and cost on future heliophysics missions.

+ University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida (2 CubeSats)
The CubeSat Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (Cu-PACE) will
perform a long-duration microgravity experiments in orbit to observe novel
low-speed collisions in greater numbers than possible in ground-based,
parabolic and suborbital flight experiments.

+ SurfSat is a science investigation that will measure plasma-induced
surface charging and electrostatic discharge measurements. It will take
in-situ measurements of the ground current waveforms from chosen common
spacecraft dielectric material samples, measure the spacecraft and material
potentials and will use a Langmuir probe system to measure the ambient
plasma environment.

+ University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (2 CubeSats)
The Miniature Tether Electrodynamics Experiment (MiTEE) will use CubeSat
capabilities to deploy a picosatellite body of approximately 8 cm × 8 cm × 2
cm from a 3U CubeSat to demonstrate and assess an ultra-small satellite
electrodynamics tether in the space environment where the fundamental
dynamics and plasma electrodynamics. The miniature electrodynamics tethers,
which are a few meters long, have the potential to provide propellantless
propulsion, passive two-axis attitude stabilization and enhanced
communication utility to the next generation of small satellites.

The Tandem Beacon Experiment (TBEx) will consist of a tandem pair of
CubeSats, each carrying tri-frequency radio beacons, in near identical, low
inclination orbits and a cluster of diagnostic sensors on five islands in
the Central Pacific sector. The science objectives and goals of TBEx are to
study how the dynamics and processes in the troposphere can act to cause
variability in the behavior of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere.

+ University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota
The Open Prototype for Educational NanoSats (OPEN) mission aims to reduce
mission risk and cost for universities, researchers and other spacecraft
developers through the creation of an open-hardware/open-source software
framework for CubeSat development. The designs use low-cost commercial
off-the-shelf parts and easily-to-fabricate printed circuit boards that can
be made using the budget of $5,000 in parts for a basic spacecraft.

In the previous five rounds of the CubeSat Launch Initiative, 114 CubeSats
from 29 states were selected. To date, 36 CubeSats have launched through the
initiative as part of the agency’s Launch Services Program’s Educational
Launch of Nanosatellite (ELaNa) Program. This year, four separate ELaNa
missions will carry seven CubeSats.

The full NASA press release can be accessed at:
http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasa-announces-sixth-round-of-cubesat-space-miss
ion-candidates/

[ANS thanks NASA for the above information]

———————————————————————

2015 NASA Academy

The NASA Academy offers a 10-week summer experience for college students
with emphasis on immersive and integrated multidisciplinary exposure and
training. Activities include laboratory research, a group project, lectures,
meetings with experts and administrators, visits to NASA centers and
space-related industries, and technical presentations. Students learn how
NASA and its centers operate, gain experience in world-class laboratories,
and participate in leadership development and team-building activities.

The sites for the NASA Academy include the following NASA centers:

— NASA Space Academy at Ames Research Center, Glenn Research Center and
Marshall Space Flight Center, with emphasis on space exploration.
— NASA Aeronautics Academy at Ames Research Center, Armstrong Flight
Research Center, and Glenn Research Center, for students with career
aspirations in aeronautics.
— NASA Propulsion Academy at Marshall Space Flight Center, for those with
interest in propulsion careers.
— NASA Robotics Academy at Ames Research Center and Marshall Space Flight
Center, with emphasis on robotics.

To be eligible to apply to any of the NASA Academy opportunities, students
must be rising juniors or seniors at the undergraduate level or be at the
early graduate level in an accredited U.S. college or university.
Applications are due Feb. 15, 2015.

For more information and to apply online, visit
https://academy.grc.nasa.gov/application-information/.

Note: Applicants must also create a student profile at
http://intern.nasa.gov.

Questions about NASA Academy should be directed to
NASA-Academy-Application@mail.nasa.gov.

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message for Feb. 5, 2015 for the
above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country.  Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, 13-15 February 2015 – Orlando HAMCATION
at the Central Florida Fairgrounds, 4603 West Colonial Drive, Orlando,
Florida

*Saturday, 14 February 2015 – presentation for the Greater Los Angeles
Mensa Regional Gathering 2015 in Los Angeles CA (Concourse Hotel at
Los Angeles International Airport)

*Friday and Saturday, 20-21 February 2015 – Yuma Hamfest in Yuma AZ
(Yuma County Fairgrounds, 32nd Street between Pacific Avenue &
Avenue 3E, south of I-8 exit 3)

*Saturday, 7 March 2015 – Irving Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Irving TX (west of Dallas)

*Friday and Saturday, 13-14 March 2015 – Green Country Hamfest in
Claremore OK (northeast of Tulsa)

*Saturday, 14 March 2015 – Science City 2015/Tucson Festival of Books
in Tucson AZ (on the University of Arizona Main Mall)

*Friday and Saturday, 20-21 March 2015 – Acadiana Hamfest in Rayne LA
(west of Lafayette)

*Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Weatherford Hamfest in Weatherford TX (west
of Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex)

*Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Scottsdale AZ (northeast of Phoenix, near AZ-101/Princess Drive)

*Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Greater Houston Hamfest and 2015 ARRL Texas
State Convention in Rosenberg TX (southwest of Houston)

*Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ (22nd
Street, east of Columbus Blvd.)

*Friday, 3 April 2015 – presentation for the Associated Radio Amateurs
of Long Beach in Signal Hill CA (Signal Hill Community Center)

*Friday, 17 April 2015 – presentation for the Oro Valley Amateur Radio
Club in Tucson AZ

*Friday through Sunday, 1-3 May 2015 – ARRL Nevada State Convention in
Reno NV (Boomtown Casino Hotel)

*Saturday, 2 May 2015 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in
Sierra Vista AZ

*Thursday, 14 May 2015 – presentation for the Escondido Amateur Radio
Society in Escondido CA

*Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, May 15-17 2015, Dayton Hamvention in
Dayton OH (Hara Arena)

*Saturday, 6 June 2015 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show Low AZ

*Friday and Saturday, 12-13 June 2015 – HAM-COM in Irving TX (west of
Dallas)

*Friday and Saturday, 7-8 August 2015 – Austin Summerfest in Austin TX

*Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, October 16-18 2015, AMSAT Symposium in
Dayton OH (Dayton Crown Plaza)

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

* An ARISS contact with schools in Italy was successful on Saturday, January
31, 2015. This was a telebridge contact with Istituto Salesiano “G. Bearzi” in
Udine and Intercultura Onlus in Milano, relayed through ground station K6DUE in
Greenbelt, Maryland. Contact was established at 08:39 UTC, 09:39 local time
with NA1SS.The astronaut was Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF, using the ISS
callsign NA1SS. Cristoforetti answered a total of 13 questions from the
students. The contact was covered by NHK TV with 500 spectators in attendance.
(See above article)

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

* A contact with students at W.T. Sampson (DoD school), Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba,is scheduled for Wed 2015-02-11 15:58:00  UTC 34 deg. The contact will be
via telebridge via IK1SLD with astronaut  Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUD.

WT Sampson Unit School is a K-12 DoDDS (Department of Defense Dependents
Schools) school located in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.  Our school provides education
opportunities for GTMO’s students from Sure Start through 12th grade.  Our
students are primarily the children of military and civilian families stationed
here at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

We are accredited by the North Central Association, Commission on
Accreditation and School Improvement (NCA CASI).  NCA  CASI is part of the
unified organization AdvancED whose focus is to help member schools continually
improve student performance and school conditions.  Our mission is to educate,
engage, and empower each student to succeed in a dynamic world.  We envision a
technologically sophisticated learning environment, supported by our families
and community, where all students attain their highest levels of success.
Where understanding and appreciating diversity is an integral part of the
learning process; thereby, empowering all students to become physically,
mentally, and emotionally healthy citizens of the global community.

Although officially designated as a Unit School, WT Sampson is actually
located on two separate campuses about 2 miles apart.  Currently, there are
approximately 130 students at the elementary school (SS through 5th grade) and
90 students (6th through 12th grade) at the secondary campus. Despite our
small size, WT Sampson provides all students with the highest quality of
education and a safe environment.  The dedicated and highly qualified faculty
remains focused on the mission, vision, and philosophy of our school.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

New Webcast – Amateur Radio Round Table

All are invited to Amateur Radio Round Table, a new series of
W5KUB.com weekly webcasts.  The webcast will be Tuesday nights at
8:00 PM Central Time (0200 UTC Wednesdays) at W5KUB.COM

Amateur Radio Round Table will be an informal discussion of all
aspects of ham radio with the intent of allowing viewers to watch
this live webcast or be a guest via Skype or Google Hangout.

To watch Amateur Radio Round Table:  Go to w5kub.com, click on Live
Events and sign in.  If you have a W5KUB account, use your User Name
and Password.  If you don’t have a W5KUB account, sign in with a
call or name without a password.

To be a guest on Amateur Radio Round Table:  Send an email message
to tom@w5kub.com.  Prior to the show, you will be provided with
information needed to join the show.

Join for fun and interesting ham radio programming. See you on
the webcast

[ANS thanks Tom Medlin, W5KUB for the above information]

Fajr downlink in 70 cm band

The Iranian satellite Fajr (i.e. ‘Dawn’) was launched on 2015-02-02
just before 09:00 UTC from Semnan launch center with a Safir rocket.
The 50 kg satellite (40387, 2015-006A), Iran’s fourth satellite, has
a cold gas thruster, so it can change its orbit. It carries a camera
for earth observations. It should have a telemetry downlink on
437.538 MHz and a command uplink in the 2 m band.

[ANS thanks Nico, PA0DLO for the above information]

Camera to record doomed ATV’s disintegration – from inside

On Monday, February 9, ESA astronaut Samantha Christoforetti will float into
Europe’s space ferry to install a special infrared camera, set to capture
unique interior views of the spacecraft’s break-up on reentry.

“The battery-powered camera will be trained on the Automated Transfer
Vehicle’s forward hatch, and will record the shifting temperatures of the
scene before it,” explains Neil Murray, overseeing the project for ESA.

“Recording at 10 frames per second, it should show us the last 10 seconds or
so of the ATV. We don’t know exactly what we might see – might there be
gradual deformations appearing as the spacecraft comes under strain, or will
everything come apart extremely quickly?

“Our Break-Up Camera, or BUC, flying for the first time on this mission,
will complement NASA’s Reentry Break-up Recorder.

“Whatever results we get back will be shared by our teams, and should tell
us a lot about the eventual reentry of the International Space Station as
well as spacecraft reentry in general.”

Every mission of ESA’s ATV ferry ends in the same way – filled with Space
Station rubbish then burning up in the atmosphere, aiming at a designated
‘spacecraft graveyard’ in an empty stretch of the South Pacific.

But the reentry of this fifth and final ATV is something special. NASA and
ESA are treating it as an opportunity to gather detailed information that
will help future spacecraft reentries.

Accordingly, ATV-5 will be steered into a shallow descent compared to the
standard deorbit path.

This ATV’s fiery demise will be tracked with a battery of cameras and
imagers, on the ground, in the air and even from the Station itself, and
this time on the vehicle itself.

ESA’s camera will not survive the reentry, expected to occur some 80–70 km
up, but it is linked to the ‘SatCom’ sphere with a ceramic thermal
protection system to endure the searing 1500°C.

Once SatCom is falling free, it will transmit its stored data to any Iridium
communication satellites in view.

Plunging through the top of the atmosphere at around 7 km/s, it will itself
be surrounded by scorching plasma known to block radio signals, but the hope
is that its omnidirectional antenna will be able to exploit a gap in its
trail.

If not, signalling will continue after the plasma has cleared – somewhere
below 40 km altitude.

Japan’s i-Ball camera managed to gather images of its Station supply ferry
breaking up in 2012. Another i-Ball was planned to fly with ATV-5, but was
lost in the Antares rocket explosion last October.

The full story with photos can be found on the ESA web:
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/Camera_to_rec
ord_doomed_ATV_s_disintegration_from_inside

[ANS thanks the European Space Agency for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-032

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Fox-1 “In The Bag”!
* 15 Schools Move Forward Into The Next Stage of ARISS Selection
* iCubeSat 2015 – 4th Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop
* January/February 2015 AMSAT Journal is Complete
* Design The Next AMSAT Satellite!
* SSTV transmissions from the International Space Station
* Dick Flagg, AH6NM, Receives YASME Award
* NASA OSSI Online Career Week
* ELaNa-X Cubesats Launched From Vandenberg on January 31
*
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over
SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-032.01
ANS-032 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 032.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE February 1, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-032.01

Fox-1 “In The Bag”!

Fox-1, the first Fox-1 series satellite (a.k.a. Fox-1A to the AMSAT
Engineering Team) completed the final required testing January 16
through 23.

The tests included the launch provider required “DITL” (Day In The
Life) and “environmental testing” subjecting the CubeSat to Vibration
and Thermal Vacuum Bakeout, the latter two sometimes referred
together as “shake and bake”.

DITL is required to show that Fox-1 will not deploy her antennas nor
transmit any signals prior to a minimum of 45 minutes after she is
deployed from the PPOD into orbit. The test was conducted at the
“Fox Labs” QTH of Jerry Buxton NØJY on January 16. Bob Fitzpatrick
KB5SQG assisted on site with Jonathan Brandenburg KF5IDY and Kevin
Bishop KG7NSD supporting via GoToMeeting. It was a somewhat suspense
filled test waiting for 45 minutes hoping nothing will happen,
followed by another 11 minutes hoping something will happen.
Everything performed as expected and the test was a success, with
transmit antenna deployment at 56 minutes 21 seconds, receive antenna
deployment at 56 minutes 32 seconds, and first transmission at 59
minutes 12 seconds.

On Monday January 19 Fox Engineering Team members Bob Davis KF4KSS,
Burns Fisher W2BFJ, and Jerry Buxton NØJY traveled to Orlando FL to
conduct the “shake and bake” at Qualtest.

Upon arrival Fox-1 was tested, inspected, and integrated into the
TestPOD at the hotel and then the team traveled to Qualtest.
Assisted by Lou McFadin W5DID, photographed by Dave Jordan AA4KN and
observed by Ed Krome K9EK the vibration testing took place on
Wednesday January 21 with frequencies and amplitudes that simulate
the ride Fox-1 will be experiencing on the Atlas V rocket during
launch, tested in all three (X,Y,Z) axes. After the “shake” a Short
Functional Test and Aliveness Test were conducted, and Fox-1 worked
like a charm!

Thursday January 21 Fox-1 was put into the thermal vacuum bell jar
to be subjected to a 12 hour pre-soak at high altitude and
temperature near the required test temperature in order to remove any
rough contaminants that might harm the ion pump used during the
“bake” procedure. Friday the 22nd Fox-1 went through the launch
required Thermal Vacuum Bakeout which sustains a vacuum <1E-4 torr at
a specified temperature for 6 hours in order to thoroughly remove any
contaminants that might be left over from construction and handling
and which could cause problems once the satellite and materials are
exposed to the vacuum of space. Given the vacuum actually achieved
during the process, we are very happy that Fox-1 was a “clean
machine” even prior to the start of the procedure! Once the “bake”
was complete Fox-1 was allowed to cool to near room temperature and
then subjected to the same Short Functional Test and Aliveness Test
as done on arrival in Florida and after the vibe test. Once again,
Fox-1 worked as it should and was officially declared ready for
launch!

While it is somewhat anti-climactic, Fox-1 was then carefully placed
in an anti-static bag and will remain there until delivery and
integration into the PPOD which is scheduled for mid-March 2015.
Battery will be charged by the umbilical but no other handling,
changes, testing, or function can be performed as once she passed the
environmental testing Fox-1 officially became “hands off”.

As previously announced launch is scheduled for late August 2015.

Official photos and more information will be included in an upcoming
AMSAT Journal. If you are on Facebook, the AMSAT North America
Facebook page has some photos that were uploaded during the
environmental testing.

[ANS thanks NØJY and the Fox-1 Engineering Team for the information.]
———————————————————————
15 US Schools Move Forward Into the Next Stage of ARISS Selection

Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT) and the American Radio
Relay League (ARRL), US managing partners of Amateur Radio on the
International Space Station (ARISS), are pleased to announce that 15
of the schools/organizations that submitted proposals during the
recent proposal window have been accepted to move forward into the
next stage of planning to host a scheduled contact with crew on the
ISS during 2015. This is a significant step in ARISS’ continuing
effort to engage young people in Science, Technology, Engineering,
and Math (STEM) activities and raise their awareness of Human Space
Flight. ARISS-US was encouraged by the high level of interest in the
education community evidenced by the significant number of submitted
proposals and the quality of the submissions.

The ARISS program anticipates that NASA will provide 12 scheduling
opportunities for US host organizations for the May – December 2015
time period. These 15 schools/organizations must now complete an
acceptable equipment plan that demonstrates their ability to execute
the ham radio contact. Once their equipment plan is approved by the
ARISS technical team, the final selected schools/organizations will
be scheduled as their availability and flexibility match up with the
scheduling opportunities offered by NASA. ARISS does not expect to be
able to schedule all 15 schools on the list.

The schools and organizations are:

Bay View Elementary School, Burlington, WA
Corpus Christi Catholic School, Chambersburg, PA
Daggett Montessori School K-8, Fort Worth, TX
Dearborn Public Schools, Dearborn, MI
Grady High School Robotics Team, Atlanta, GA
Kopernik Observatory & Science Center, Vestal, NY
Maconaquah School Corporation, Bunker Hill, IN
Moon Day/ Frontiers of Flight Museum, Dallas, TX
New Mexico Military Institute, Roswell, NM
Pima County 4H/Vail Vaquero’s 4H Club, Tucson, AZ
Space Jam 9, Rantoul, IL
Ste. Genevieve du Bois Catholic Elementary School, Warson Woods, MO
Tulsa Community College, NE Campus, Tulsa, OK
United Space School, Seabrook, TX
West Michigan Aviation Academy, Grand Rapids, MI

[ANS thanks ARISS-US for the above information]
———————————————————————
iCubeSat 2015 – 4th Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop
26 – 27 May 2015, Imperial College London, United Kingdom

iCubeSat 2015, the 4th Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop, will address
the technical challenges, opportunities, and practicalities of
interplanetary space exploration with CubeSats. The workshop provides
a unique environment for open wide ranging practical collaboration
between academic researchers, industry professionals, policy makers
and students from around the world developing this new and rapidly
growing field.

Technical Program

Talks and round tables will focus on three themes: technology,
science, and open collaboration. The program will also include
unconference sessions to provide additional opportunities to engage
with the interplanetary CubeSat community and potential
collaborators. Talks and supporting material will be streamed and
archived on the conference website. A lively social program in and
around summertime London will be arranged for participants and their
guests.

Abstract Submission and Dates

Talks on astrodynamics, attitude control and determination systems,
citizen science, communications, landers, launch opportunities, open
source approaches, outreach, payloads, policy, power systems,
propulsion, reentry systems, ride-shares, science missions, software,
standardization, structures, systems engineering and other related
topics are all welcome.

1st June 2014 Registration opens at http://iCubeSat.org/registration/

1st April 2015 Abstract upload deadline via
http://iCubeSat.org/submit-an-abstract/

15th April 2015 Notification of abstract acceptance

22nd May 2015 Presentation (and optional paper) upload deadline

Please confirm your interest in presenting or attending as soon as
possible (to assist us size the venue) by completing the registration
form at http://iCubeSat.org/registration/

Exhibition

CubeSat specialists and other vendors are invited to contact
exhibit@iCubeSat.org for details of exhibition opportunities.

Location

The fourth Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop will be held on the
Imperial College South Kensington campus, London, United Kingdom on
Tuesday, May 26th and Wednesday May 27th, 2015.

For more details please visit the conference website at
www.iCubeSat.org

[ANS thanks CubeSat mailing list for the above information]
———————————————————————
January/February 2015 AMSAT Journal is Complete

The January/February 2015 AMSAT Journal is complete and has been
sent to the
print shop.

In this issue you’ll find ….

+ AMSAT Announcements – 2015 Symposium in Dayton, Ohio
+ Apogee View by Barry Baines, WD4ASW
+ Fox-1A Flight Model Passes Environmental Testing (with photos)
+ There’s an App for That: Smart Phone Applications for Satellites
by Mark D. Johns, K0MDJ
+ New Column: Orbital Debrief for January/February
by Paul Stoetzer, N8HM
+ 4M: a Moon mission by Ghislain Ruy, LX2RG
+ Ballistically Reinforced Communications Satellite (BRICSat-P):
The Enhancement of the APRS Amateur Radio Network Through
Micropropulsion by Ensign Christopher Dinelli, et al
+ Report from the 2014 AMSAT Space Symposium and Annual Meeting
in Baltimore
+ Support our 2014 Prize Donors!
+ The AMSAT Space Symposium Photo Gallery
+ Recognition and Thanks to Our Dedicated Volunteers in 2014

Look for this issue to arrive in your mailbox in the next few weeks.

As always, please send your articles, operating photos, and
announcements to
the Journal mailbox at journal@amsat.org or to k9jkm@comcast.net.

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Journal Team, Bernhard, VA6BMJ; Douglas,
KA2UPW/5;
Howard, K3JPH; Joe, KB6IGK; JoAnne, K9JKM for the above information]
———————————————————————
Design The Next AMSAT Satellite!

At the 2014 AMSAT Space Symposium AMSAT Vice President – Engineering
Jerry Buxton announced the plan for the next generation of AMSAT
satellites. “The door is open for everyone, to submit their ideas.
AMSAT Engineering has a long term strategy and this is the first
step.”

The Engineering long term strategy includes the following goals

* Advancement of amateur radio satellite technical and communications
skills
* Enhance international goodwill
* Grow and sustain a skilled pool of amateur radio satellite engineers
* Establish and maintain partnerships with educational institutions
* Develop a means to use hardware common to all opportunities

With respect to the last goal Jerry said “Within the bounds of the
type of satellite it takes to achieve any of the various orbit
opportunities, let’s consider in those plans the possibility of
developing a platform that can suit any and all orbits. Perhaps a
modular CubeSat, using a common bus as we did in Fox-1, which gives
great flexibility in building and flying different sizes and
configurations of CubeSats with simple common-design hardware
changes.”

Submissions should be thorough and contain the following
information. The purpose of the proposal is not just in suggesting
an idea; being an all-volunteer team AMSAT needs your help in
carrying out the idea.

Design
Implementation – CubeSat platform
Estimated timeline
Cost – volunteer resources, commercial (COTS) units
Launch – how does it get to orbit
Strategy – how it fits into AMSAT’s Engineering long term strategy
As mentioned above the idea should be based on the CubeSat platform.
This is the standard through which we will look for launches in the
foreseeable future.

In considering your proposal, Jerry encourages you to contact him,
(n0jy@amsat.org using Subject: Design the Next AMSAT Satelleite), for
more details on the criteria.

A guidebook to the criteria is now available for download at
http://tinyurl.com/ANS032-SatelliteGuide.
In particular, if you plan to include a university as a partner to
provide experiments or other support and you are not representing
that university, please contact Jerry for assistance in working with
our existing partners or establishing a new partnership.

“Being amateur radio operators, it is easy for us to fall into a
particular trap because of our history of communicating with other
amateurs throughout the world” says Jerry. “Specifically, most people
who are not already involved in the world of satellite technology are
unaware of or simply overlook the provisions of the current ITAR and
soon to be EAR export rules particularly with regard to deemed
exports which requires governmental permission to discuss satellite
projects with foreign nationals.”

While all amateurs are invited to submit ideas, U.S. amateurs must
take particular care of they choose to become involved in a
collaboration which includes individuals from other countries. It is
permissible to receive ideas and proposals from outside the U.S., but
it is not permitted for U.S. Persons to export or share design ideas
with other countries unless they have taken the proper steps to
insure compliance with ITAR and deemed export rules.

Additionally, those wishing to work on proposals should use care in
presenting themselves in their contacts. While the goal is for AMSAT
to build and launch the satellite, it is not an AMSAT project until
it is accepted by the AMSAT Board of Directors. It is acceptable to
represent yourself as members of a project team that plans to submit
a proposal to AMSAT for a future satellite project, as the AMSAT name
is well known.

“It is not our intention that ideas be submitted to AMSAT-NA which
would be more appropriately handled by an AMSAT organization in a
country where AMSAT is established. AMSAT-NA is seeking ideas from
amateurs in North America and will certainly consider ideas from
amateurs in countries which do not have an established AMSAT
organization or relationships with an existing AMSAT organization.”

The deadline for submissions is May 30, 2015. After the submission
date the ideas will be screened for completeness and then reviewed by
a board consisting of the AMSAT Engineering Team, AMSAT Senior
Officer and Board of Directors representatives, and aerospace
industry members. The review board may modify or consolidate ideas
and will consider which meet the criteria to become a project based
on feasibility, cost, and the ability to bring value to the amateur
satellite community. The review process is expected to be completed
in September 2015.

For those ideas selected to become a project which satisfy the
requirements for an ELaNa launch, the idea authors will be asked to
work with the AMSAT Engineering Team on an ELaNa proposal.

The Engineering Team will then work on the details of execution for
the selected project(s) and present a proposal to the AMSAT Board of
Directors in October 2015 for final approval to begin work. Once
approved, any ELaNa proposals will be submitted in November 2015 and
the project(s) will move forward.

Now is the time for YOU to begin working on the next AMSAT satellite!

[ANS thanks AMSAT Engineering for the above information]
———————————————————————
SSTV transmissions from the International Space Station

The Russian ARISS team plan to activated SSTV from the ISS on
Saturday January 31 and will cintinue on Sunday February 1, 2015.

Expected SSTV mode will be PD180 on 145.800 MHz with 3 minute off
periods between transmissions. A total of 12 different photos will be
sent during the operational period. This is the second series of
pictures to be transmitted.

Start time would be around 10.00 UTC on January 31 and 9.00 UTC on
February 1. The transmissions should terminate around 21:30 UTC each
day.

[ANS thanks Gaston ON4WF for the above information]
———————————————————————
Dick Flagg, AH6NM, Receives YASME Award

Champion of integrating Amateur Radio and space science is honored
for achievements

ARISS (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) is pleased
to share the news that the 2015 Yasme Excellence Award has been
presented to Dick Flagg, AH6NM, for his contributions to the success
of the ARISS program and other efforts in support of Amateur Radio
and space science-related initiatives.

The Yasme Award is given to outstanding individuals who have served
the Amateur Radio community in areas of technical advancement,
operating arts and good will. Recipients are chosen by the not-for-
profit Yasme Foundation. ARISS, which gives students the opportunity
to ask questions of astronauts on board the ISS (International Space
Station) via Amateur Radio, aims to spark an interest in science,
technology, engineering and math (STEM) subjects and careers among
young people while simultaneously serving as an introduction to
Amateur Radio.

Flagg first supported the SAREX (Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment)
program, the pre-cursor of ARISS, on the 1990 STS-35 mission, with
Astronaut Dr. Ron Parise, WA4SIR (SK), on board. Flagg helped pioneer
the telebridge concept for Dr. Parise’s mission, which is now an
operational capability for ARISS. The telebridge enables school
students to talk to on-orbit crew members through amateur radio
ground stations that are not co-located at the school but are linked
to the school through a phone line connection. His pioneering work on
the telebridge concept has allowed hundreds of schools to contact the
ISS when conditions, such as ground obstructions or high buildings,
would have prevented the contact. Flagg provided critical SAREX
support by helping students communicate with Dr. Parise and other
astronauts on STS-35 using the telebridge ground station he pioneered
in Hawaii. Since then, Flagg has been involved in more than 115
contacts to the Shuttle and ISS from the ARISS Hawaii telebridge
ground station located at Sacred Hearts Academy in Honolulu, an all-
girls school where he emphasized STEM through student involvement in
the contacts.

The award also recognized Flagg’s contributions to the NASA Radio
Jove educational outreach program, which has introduced radio
telescope kits to nearly 2,000 student groups and radio amateurs
around the world.

“While it was indeed an honor for me to receive this award from the
Yasme Foundation,” says Flagg, “I feel that I am accepting it for
both the ARISS and Radio Jove teams. Congratulations to all of you.”

For more on the Yasme Foundation and the Yasme Award, visit
www.yasme.org.

For more on the ARISS program, visit www.ariss.org. You may also
join ARISS on Facebook and follow it on Twitter: @ARISS_status.

[ANS thanks Dave AA4KN and YASME for the above information]
———————————————————————
NASA OSSI Online Career Week

The NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative, or OSSI, is hosting the NASA
OSSI Online Career Week Feb. 10-12, 2015. This online event will
connect you with NASA, science, technology, engineering and
mathematics, or STEM, employers and top graduate programs nationwide.
Engage with representatives from all 10 NASA centers to learn about
internship, scholarship and fellowship opportunities available at
NASA. Interact with recruiters from top STEM employers, and explore
internship and job opportunities in the private sector. Learn about
highly ranked STEM graduate programs and network with admissions
officers from the comfort of your home, dorm, smartphone or tablet.
Register for one or all events and launch your career today!

NASA OSSI Online Career Week Live Events
— NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships Day — Feb. 10,
2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)
— STEM Industry Day — Feb. 11, 2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)
— STEM Graduate Programs Fair — Feb. 12, 2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)

Starting on February 9, you will be able to research participating
organizations and explore opportunities listed. Complete your
profile, and prepare a few questions for the centers, companies or
graduate programs you are interested in. During the live events, you
will engage in one-on-one text-based conversations directly with a
recruiter or admissions officer at those organizations. You can share
your background, experience and resume and ask questions. Maximize
your time in the event by getting in line to chat with
representatives from more than one center, company or university at a
time.

To attend, please register at http://nasaossi.brazenconnect.com/.

For more information, please contact nasaossi at hsf dot net.

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message for Jan. 29, 2015 for the
above information]
———————————————————————
ELaNa-X Cubesats Launched From Vandenberg on January 31

Mike Rupprecht, DK3WN, reported on his SatBlog
(http://www.dk3wn.info) that the Saturday, January 31 Delta II launch
from Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base carrying the
Soil Moisture Active Passive, or SMAP, satellite also included a
secondary payload with ELaNa cubesats. The main payload and secondary
payload were deployed successfully.

Cubesat Downlink
—————– ——————-
Firebird-II FU3 437.405 MHz 19k2 FSK
Firebird-II FU4 437.230 MHz 19k2 FSK
GRIFEX 437.485 MHz 9k6 FSK
Exocube (CP-10) 437.270 MHz 9k6 FSK
(source DK3WN http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?p=54555)

Jan, PE0SAT described his receiving and decoding configuration on his
website:
http://www.pe0sat.vgnet.nl/2015/grifex-active-and-decoded/

The University of Michigan released updated software to decode GRIFEX
packets:
http://exploration.engin.umich.edu/blog/?p=2555

Mike, DK3WN shows screen captures of receiving Firebird-II FU3 and
FU4 at:
http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?p=54977

[ANS thanks Mike, DK3WN and Jan, PE0SAT for the above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between Japan Broadcasting
Corporation (NHK)“Masakame event” Tokyo, Japan event and Astronaut
Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF using NA1SS. The contact began 2015-01-
24 14:21 UTC and lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was
direct via JK1ZRW. ARISS Mentor was 7M3TJZ. 8 questions were
answered and approximately 200 people were in attendance. The event
was covered by NHK TV station.

+ A Successful contact was made among Istituto Salesiano “G.
Bearzi”, Udine, Italy; Intercultura Onlus, Milano, Italy and
Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF using NA1SS. The contact
began 2015-01-31 08:38:59 UTC and lasted about nine and a half
minutes. Contact was telebridged via K6DUE.
ARISS Mentor was IKØWGF. 13 questions were answered. 400 were in
attendance at Salesiano “G. Bearzi” and 100 at Intercultura Onlus.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Scuola Media Locatelli-Oriani, Milano, Italy and Scuola Secondaria
di Primo Grado “Bachelet”, Cernusco sul naviglio, Italy are expected
to make contact with Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti IZØUDF on 2015-
02-05 10:37:35 UTC. The contact is scheduled as a Telebridge via
W6SRJ. The ISS downlink should be audible over portions of the
Western United States.

Presentation Scuola Media Locatelli-Oriani

The middle school Locatelli Oriani is located in the center of
Milan, just a few steps from the planetarium. It’s part of the
comprehensive institute Pisacane and Poerio: two buildings with
primary school and middle school. All the activities, both from
educational and didactical point of view are primarily focused on
well-being of students. The educational proposal, following the
ministerial indication, has been enriched by educational trips,
schools trips, sports days, concerts, music, theatre and dance as
well as themed initiatives in science, languages and art. Among these
there are KET and PET (in-depth courses about foreign languages),
summer holidays abroad, participation to the math games held by
Bocconi university and “Scatti di scienza” (photographs and movies
competition about science made by students).
The school was involved also in Mission X 2012 and, together with
Rai Scuola (the national TV), have been realized a documentary movie
for the ministerial project “Salute”.
There is the student council, two students per class elected by the
others. They meet monthly to discuss and propose new ideas and
initiatives on how to improve the school and develop solidarity,
community spirit and recognition of human and civil rights. Since
several years the council is taking care of children remote adoption,
together with humanitarian organizations.

Presentation of Scuola Secondaria di Primo Grado “Bachelet”

The school V. Bachelet is a natural continuation of the educational
work begun in 1981 by some parents and teachers, founding the
Elementary School “The Aurora”, they were attempting to create a
school in a cooperative solidarity-based education. Since 2006 the
Institute Aurora-Bachelet is twinned with the Little Prince Primary
School in Nairobi and since September 2012 is based in the brand new
facility located in Via Buonarroti in Cernusco S/N.

The students from the third classes followed, over the last few
years, an articulated astronomy course marked by significant moments:
realization of a book to celebrate the 40th Moon landing anniversary,
visit the astronomical observatory in Cernusco S/N, see the live
event between Pope Benedict XVI and the ISS, meet ESA astronaut Paolo
Nespoli, meet the professor Amalia Ercoli Finzi from Milan
University, meet mr. Valerio Nassi and his hand-made space models and
meet eng. Marco Molina (Selex ES) who introduced in several lessons
the human space exploration and robotic space exploration (specially
focused on Rosetta mission).

Preparing for the school contact with ESA astronaut Samantha
Cristoforetti, eng. Marco Molina introduced to students all the
details about her Futura mission and provided an autographed
Samantha’s potrait picture.

The schools will alternate questions during the contact. The English
translation of the anticipated questions include:
1. Elena: We know that in space is possible to grow plants, but how
do you put water and how do you prevent topsoil from floating
around?
2. Diana: Is, the precise schedule on the ISS, a constraint or a
needs for you?
3. Gaia: Thanks to microgravity, the ISS is a barrier-free
environment: do you think space could be considered the new
frontier especially for people with disabilities?
4. Maria: Looking at the Sun rising so many times a day is affecting
in some way your body and mind? Which are the most important body
modification you feel in microgravity?
5. Andrea: Are the computer used in space different from what we use
on earth? Which operating system do they have?
6. Davide: How did you discover your passion for astronomy? Did you
remember people or events that helped to?
7. Alessandro: Node 2 and 3 have been built in Italy. Do you feel
home moving inside these modules?
8. Lia: How do you spend your free time, if you have it, on the ISS?
9. Rebecca: Would you take part in a trip to Mars and back?
10. Andrea: Which people and things do you miss most while living on
ISS? How is the life in orbit with just a few people? Do you feel
alone?
11. Filippo: We see that you share your experience from the
beginning and you still do from there: do you plan to write a book
at your return to Earth?
12. Laura: Despite your very long training, did you see things on
the ISS that you would never imagined?
13. Filippo: What will you bring back to Earth both physically and
mentally?
14. Daniela: Which activities and experiments are you performing on
the ISS?
15. Alessia: What was the detail that impressed you most on the ISS?
16. Sergio: How and what do you eat in space? Which are your
favourite foods and what is the flavour?
17. Vincenzo: Is it more difficult doing activities without the
effect of weight?
18. Claudia: Did you see the historical landing of Rosetta on a
comet? If yes, what was your feeling?
19. Loredana: Coming back to Earth, wow are you going to get back
used again to weight and gravity, coming back to Earth?
20. Anishta: Do you think it would be possible living in space for
normal people like us as students?
21. Anna: What was your feeling after the launch, as soon as you
realized of being in space?
22. Matteo: Did you have troubles on the ISS up to now? If yes, what?

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N, David AA4KN for the above
information]

Television Report about ARISS, Produced by Italian RAI-3 TV

The ARISS contact performed Friday January 9, 2015 with three
Italian schools was reported extensively by the “Spaziolibero”
television program, sponsored by the Italian parliament.

Emanuele D’Andria I0ELE, President AMSAT Italia, Francesco De Paolis
IK0WGF, secretary AMSAT Italia and Piero Tognolatti I0KPT did an
outstanding job presenting ARISS and Amateur Radio to the general
public.

The program – in Italian – is presently available at:

http://tinyurl.com/ANS032-ARISSonTV

The video narration gives visibility to the ARISS program, ARISS
school contacts and HAMTV.

Congratulations to our Italian colleagues for outstanding public
relations!

[ANS thanks Gaston, ON4WF, for the above information]
———————————————————————
Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars

NASA Educator Professional Development (EPD) presents free webinars
open to all educators. Join NASA Education Specialists to learn about
activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA
into your classroom. Visit the NASA EPD website for more information
and to register for any upcoming webinars at
https://paragon-tec.adobeconnect.com/admin/show-event-catalog

[ANS thanks NEON – NASA Educators Online Network for the above
information]

+ Test Flight for Privately Funded LightSail Spacecraft

Lightsail flies in May…

Planetary Society Blog Page:
http://tinyurl.com/ANS032-BlogLightsail

Planetary Society Press Release
http://preview.tinyurl.com/ANS032-ReleaseLightsail

[ANS thanks the Planetary Society for the above information]

+ This homebrew satellite antenna project looks quite do-able:
http://www.dxzone.com/cgi-bin/dir/jump2.cgi?ID=30585

[ANS thanks JoAnne K9JKM and DXZone for the above information]
———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-025

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Listen In To Radar Observations of Near-Earth Asteroid 2004 BL86
* SKN on OSCAR Best Fist Nominations Due
* Upcoming ARISS Contact
* Containerized Satellite Survey
* Search for NASA Educational Resources With New Search Tool

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-025.01
ANS-025 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 025.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
January 25, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-025.01

Listen In To Radar Observations of Near-Earth Asteroid 2004 BL86

On 2015 January 26, the near-Earth asteroid 2004 BL86 will pass within 0.008 AU
of Earth (3.1 times as far away as the Moon).  This will be the closest approach
to Earth by this asteroid for at least the next 240 years.

As part of an extensive campaign of radar observations to learn about
BL86’s shape, spin state, and surface; and to refine knowledge of its
trajectory; the Arecibo Observatory’s S-band planetary radar plans to illuminate
the asteroid with a continuous-wave signal over 2015 January 27 03:45 – 04:00
UTC.  Over that time, BL86’s radar echo will be received by elements of the Very
Long Baseline Array and the Very Large Array in New Mexico.  Anyone with an
antenna and receiver capable of detecting the echo is welcome to listen in.

BL86 will be above the horizon for most observers in North and South America,
and for some parts of western Europe and western Africa. To readily detect its
radar echo, observers should have an antenna with an effective collecting area
of at least 10 square meters. BL86 will be moving rapidly across the sky.  Over
Jan 27 03:45 – 04:00, it will move by ~0.5º.  The asteroid’s exact position on
the sky will depend on where it is observed from as well as the time, but will
be near (RA,Dec) = (130º,+17º).  A current ephemeris can be obtained from JPL’s
Horizons system:
http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/?horizons.

The Arecibo transmission will be tuned to give a nominal echo center frequency
of exactly 2380 MHz at geocenter.  Without correction for Earth’s rotation,
BL86’s radar echo will appear as slowly-drifting and within 15 kHz of 2380 MHz.
Predicted echo frequency as a function of time for a given location can be
obtained on-request by emailing Michael Busch (mbusch@seti.org).  We expect an
echo bandwidth of 6 Hz or less.

Details of the BL86 radar observing campaign at the Arecibo Observatory, NASA’s
Goldstone Solar System Radar facility, and the National Radio Astronomy
Observatory are available at:
http://echo.jpl.nasa.gov/asteroids/2004BL86/2004BL86_planning.html.

[ANS thanks JPL for the above information]

———————————————————————

SKN on OSCAR Best Fist Nominations Due

Thanks to all who participated in AMSAT’s Straight Key Night on OSCAR 2015.  If
you haven’t already done so, please take a moment to nominate someone you worked
for Best Fist.  Your nominee need not have had the best fist of those you heard,
only of those you worked.

Send your nomination to w2rs@amsat.org

[ANS thanks Ray, W2RS, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Upcoming ARISS Contact

An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants
at Masakame” event, Shibuya, Japan on 24 Jan. The event is scheduled to begin at
approximately 14:21 UTC. The duration of the contact is approximately 9 minutes
and 30 seconds. The contact will be direct between NA1SS and JK1ZRW. The contact
should be audible over Japan and adjacent areas. Interested parties are invited
to listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted
in English.

Japan Broadcasting Corp. (NHK) are televising a regular science program Masakame
(means Good Heavens) for young people and their parents.

Aa special program focusing ARISS program and Amateur radio satellites, etc. on
2015-02-28 on air, with video record of ARISS school contact. Members of
contact are TV talent (who has a amateur radio license) and high school
students (age 15 to 18).

[ANS thanks David, AA4KN, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Containerized Satellite Survey

Bungo Shiotani is a Ph.D. student working with Dr. Norman Fitz-Coy at the
University of Florida. He is requesting your assistance with this survey to
assess the potential impact that containerized satellite have on the debris
population in low Earth orbit. The results will be used as part of his Ph.D.
dissertation to create a statistical database and to quantify the growth of
debris population. The hope is the outcome will increase the awareness to the
community regarding the potential growth of debris population due to
containerized satellites.

Your identify will not be collected unless you choose to disclose it in the
survey. Additionally, if you would like the results sent directly to you, please
disclose your contact information when requested in the survey.

Please respond to this survey by Friday, February 27th 2015. The survey should
take less than 30 minutes to complete.

Survey link: https://ufl.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_8CYyyDTFUGKHFbL

Please forward this information to other members of the space community.

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to contact:

Bungo Shiotani
Graduate Researcher
bshiota@ufl.edu

Dr. Norman Fitz-Coy
Research Advisor
nfc@ufl.edu

[ANS thanks Bungo Shiotani for the above information]

———————————————————————

Search for NASA Educational Resources With New Search Tool

Are you looking for a lesson plan about the planet Jupiter? Do you need a
poster with information about the Wright Brothers’ first flight? Or maybe
you’re hunting for a website with information about NASA’s deep space
missions. NASA Education has a new tool to help you in your search!

NASA’s new Educational Resource Search Tool can help you find lesson plans,
posters, educator guides and other materials to supplement your science,
technology, engineering and mathematics curriculum. Search hundreds of
resources by subject, grade level, type and keywords.

To check out the new search tool and begin your educational resource hunt,
visit http://www.nasa.gov/education/materials/

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Jan. 22, 2015 for the
above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-018

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Fox-1A Launch Date
* Most Current ISS Keps
* NASA Cubesat Simulators Intern Opportunities Summer 2015
* AESP-14 CubeSat on ISS awaiting deployment
* OGMS-SA CubeSat to provide FM Transponder
* Call for Speakers and Papers for the 41st Eastern VHF/UHF/Microwave
Conference
* Dick Flagg, AH6NM, honored as Yasme Excellence Award Winner
* Video of FUNcube-1 demonstration at IARU-R1 conference
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-018.01
ANS-018 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 018.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE January 18, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-018.01

—————————————————– —————-

Fox-1A Launch Date

AMSAT has received a launch date for the Fox-1A satellite. Fox-1A will
be launched on August 27, 2015 on a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5
rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California on the NROL-55 flight
for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The launch time has not
been announced.

Fox-1A Operating Frequencies include:

Uplink 435.180 MHz FM
Downlink 145.980 MHz FM

The AMSAT Fox series of satellites will include additional opportunities
for launch during 2015-2016:

+ Fox-1B will fly with the Vanderbilt University radiation
experiments expected in 2016.

+ Fox-1C* will launch on Spaceflight’s maiden mission of the
SHERPA multi-cubesat deployer during the 3rd quarter of 2015.

+ Fox-1D is a flight spare for Fox-1C. If not needed as a spare
it will become available to launch on any open launch slot which
becomes available and be submitted in a Cubesat Launch Initiative
(CSLI) proposal in 2015.

+ Fox-1E is built as a flight spare for Fox-1B but has been included
in a student science proposal as part of the November, 2014 CSLI
for an ELaNa flight slot. If selected the Fox-1B spare will fly as
Fox-1E.

* The flight for Fox-1C has been purchased by AMSAT. It is not funded by
the Cubesat Launch Initiative ELaNa program. Fund raising for the
$125,000 launch costs for Fox-1C are underway. We have commissioned a
unique challenge coin for donors who have contributed at the $100 level
or higher. This challenge coin is shaped as an isometric view of a Fox-1
CubeSat, complete with details such as the stowed UHF antenna, solar cells,
and camera lens viewport. Struck in 3mm thick brass, plated with antique
silver, and finished in bright enamel, the coin is scaled to be
approximately 1:4 scale, or 1 inch along each of the six sides. The reverse
has the AMSAT Fox logo.

You may donate at:

+ The AMSAT web site
http://www.amsat.org

+ AMSAT’s page on the FundRazr crowdsourcing web site
http://fnd.us/c/6pz92/sh/561Zd

+ Or Call Martha at the AMSAT Office (888) 322-6728

[ANS thanks the Fox-1 Team for the above information]

—————————————————- ——————

Most Current ISS Keps

AMSAT has been working on updating the keps for the ISS in a more
timely manner. Joe Fitzgerald has confirmed that the AMSAT keps
download site is now updated with the latest ISS data.

Here is his comment:

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ftp/keps/current/nasabare.txt
is updated daily at 11:18 UTC with TLE’s from Spaceflight.nasa.gov
http://tinyurl.com/ANS018-ISS-TRAJECTORY-DATA

According to Joe Fitzgerald, “This is a very significant improvement
and should be very helpful for this who need accurate keps for school
contacts and other ISS activities.”

The bulletins remain on a weekly schedule with data from spacetrack.org
The ARISS team suggests this information should be share accordingly.

[ANS Thanks Joe Fitzgerald, KM1P, and ARISS for the above
information.]

———————————————– ———————–

NASA Cubesat Simulators Intern Opportunities Summer 2015

CubeSat Simulator Intern Opportunities in Greenbelt, MD USA
The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is offering an internship
position for the Summer 2015 semester. Applications are being taken
on the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (OSSI) recruiting web site.

To search, go to:
https://intern.nasa.gov –> Student Opportunities –> Internships –>
and you are brought to a page with tabs. The opening tab HOME
describes the main ground rules and schedule. Click the SEARCH
OPPORTUNITIES tab and scroll to the very bottom. Enter Keyword in the
box: “cubesat” without the quotes, then click the Search and then you
will get a growing list of opportunities including the Cubesat
Simulator, Cubesat Groundstation, and PICetSat Module & PCB
Development. This brings the student to this page:

https://intern.nasa.gov/ossi/web/public/guest/searchOpps/

Again, the Internship Titles are:
o CubeSat Simulator Upgrade Plus
o CubeSat Ground Station Development
o PICetSat Module & PCB Development

The objective of this Opportunity is to allow a university level
student to rework, repair and improve a prototype “1-Unit” CubeSat
simulator/model on loan from AMSAT and then to share his or her
experiences as a result. The model used in this Opportunity is
similar to that described in The AMSAT Journal article “Education
With a Satellite Simulator: ETP CubeSat Simulator,” by Mr. Mark
Spencer, ARRL Education and Technology Program Coordinator, Part 1
in the the September/October 2009 issue and Part 2 in the November/
December 2009 issue.

Back copies are available at:
http://www.arrl.org/files/file/ETP/CubeSat/CubeSat-Pt1-SepOct09.pdfhttp://www.arrl.org/files/file/ETP/CubeSat/CubeSat-Pt2-NovDec09.pdf

A course of study in engineering is required. Electrical/Electronics
Engineering (EE) or Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) for
university students in their junior class or higher. Experience in
hardware is also required.

Open to U.S. citizens.

The immediate skills required of the intern are to be a well-rounded
individual, and to have an excellent knowledge of and experience with
Windows operating systems, Microsoft Office (especially in using
spreadsheets), electrical and electronic circuits (theory and
practice), microcontrollers, interfacing, and the use of basic
laboratory test equipment and procedures.

Familiarity with the CubeSat community is important.

A proficiency in either C++ or a similar language for microcontrollers
and the desire to learn a new one is necessary. A basic understanding
of data acquisition, signal processing, or control is required.

Hands-on experience in building something, repairing or upgrading
PCs or other electronic gear, or just getting stuff to work is required.
Mechanical and electrical construction skills will be used.

Experience in RF or wireless technology (anywhere between 3 and
2400 MHz) is very important. Holding or obtaining an Amateur Radio
license from the FCC and practical radio experience is a distinct
advantage.

A good attitude, an exceptional willingness to learn and to contribute
as a team player are essential qualities. Likewise, excellent
communicator skills (verbal, writing and definitely e-mail),
reliability, punctuality, having a self-starter work ethic and the
ability & desire to work independently for long periods are required.

You may ask questions regarding the tasks and skill requirements
with the mentor in advance (Mr. Pat Kilroy, Code 568,
Patrick.L.Kilroy@nasa.gov) and
telephone interviews will be available.

The student application instructions provide a deadline of March 1
to apply, but mentors will start evaluating applications as soon as
next week. The word to the wise is to get one’s application in ASAP
and certainly within the next three weeks!

Applications must be made via the OSSI web. Please Be sure to enclose
your callsign.

https://intern.nasa.gov/ossi/web/public/main/index.cfm?sola rAction=
view&subAction=content&contentCode=HOME_PAGE_INTERNSHIPS

[ANS thanks NASA and Pat, N8PK for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

OGMS-SA CubeSat to provide FM Transponder

The AESP-14 is a 1U CubeSat developed by undergraduate and graduate
engineering students at the Technology Institute of Aeronautics (ITA)
in Brazil. The satellite’s primary mission is to test the various
subsystems in the space environment.

The satellite was sent to the International Space Station (ISS) on
January 10 by the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch and it is now awaiting
release into space by the JEM orbital deployer (J-SSOD) at the Kibo
Japanese module.

The satellite has an amateur radio experiment developed by the
Americana Amateur Radio Club (CRAM). The experiment consists of the
random transmission of 100 sequences of ASCII characters prefixed
with the “CRAM” word that will used as part of a contest among
receiving stations. The first 10 amateur radio stations that complete
receiving the 100 sequences will be awarded a commemorative diploma.
A web site is being developed to collect the sequences. The site
address will be announced shortly.

AESP-14 will transmit with an RF power of 500 mW on 437.600 MHz using
the 9600 bps G3RUH modulation (GFSK) and AX.25 UI framing. Radio
amateurs are encouraged to send any telemetry frames received back to
the team. Telemetry format and more information will be published in
the project web site
http://www.aer.ita.br/~aesp14

An update bulletin will be released as soon as the final launch date
is announced by NASA.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK and Edson, PY2SDR for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

OGMS-SA CubeSat to provide FM Transponder

OGMS-SA is a 3U CubeSat being developed by students at the Paris-Est
Creteil University as part of the QB50 constellation.
The purposes of this CubeSat include upper atmosphere science; radio
communication experiments; technology demonstrator; education,
training and outreach.
Additionally it will provide an FM voice transponder for amateur use.
Planning is to use VHF uplink and UHF downlink with 9k6 FX25 GMSK
modulation. A downlink of 437.545 MHz has been coordinated.

OGMS-SA CubeSat
http://www.esep.pro/-CubeSat-OGMS-SA-En-construction-.html

Source IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination
http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru

QB50 CubeSat Launch Contract Signed
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/01/28/qb50-cubesat-launch-contract-signed /

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

Call for Speakers and Papers for the 41st Eastern VHF/UHF/Microwave
Conference

Talks and papers, both long and short, are needed for the 41st
Eastern VHF/UHF/Microwave Conference on April 17-19 2015 in
Manchester, CT.

Please tell us about what you have been working on: Operating,
contesting, construction, homebrewing, microwaves.

Please let Paul, W1GHZ, (w1ghz@arrl.net) know if you are considering
a presentation or paper. A commitment by the end of February would be
appreciated, with a deadline of 18 March.

The conference organizers are also planning another Friday afternoon
workshop. One suggestion is for an Antenna Modeling workshop. We
could even do two simultaneous workshops – one for Antenna Modeling
and something else for those who aren’t computer-oriented. Any
suggestions, please.

Find additional details at
http://www.newsvhf.com/vhfconf.html

[ANS thanks Paul, W1GHZ for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

Dick Flagg, AH6NM, honored as Yasme Excellence Award Winner

The Yasme Foundation Board of Directors has announced the recipients
of several awards. The Foundation named four individuals to receive
the Yasme Excellence Award for 2014.

Honored as Yasme Excellence Award winners were:

* Kimo Chun, KH7U, for 20 years of behind-the-scenes support to
DXpeditions to Pacific entities — including logistics, organization,
equipment, local contacts, and planning.

* Dick Flagg, AH6NM, for his years of working with the Amateur
Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program and its
predecessor Shuttle Amateur Radio EXperiment (SAREX), and for
supporting NASA’s Radio Jove project, both designed to introduce
Amateur Radio to students and the general public.

* Florin Cristian Predescu, YO9CNU, and Lisa Leenders, PA2LS, for
their work in organizing and promoting Youngsters on the Air (YOTA)
and Amateur Radio youth activities.

The Yasme Excellence Award is presented to individuals who, through
their own service, creativity, effort, and dedication, have made a
significant contribution to Amateur Radio in technical, operating, or
organizational achievement.

http://www.yasme.org/news_release/2014-01-07.pdf

[ANS thanks ARRL Letter and YASME Foundation for the above
information]

——————————————- ————————–

Video of FUNcube-1 demonstration at IARU-R1 conference

Riaan Greeff ZS4PR has released a video of the demonstration of the
FUNcube-1 (AO-73) CubeSat by Graham Shirville G3VZV to delegates at
the IARU Region 1 Conference in September 2014.

Mats SM6EAN has posted a brief report on the Swedish Amateur Radio
Society (SSA) website about the FUNcube-1 CubeSat presentation at the
IARU Region 1 General Conference in Varna-Albena, Bulgaria.

The following is translated from the original Swedish post.

After the session of the VHF, UHF and Microwave C5 Committee had
completed the delegates were given two interesting presentations.

Graham Shirville G3VZV did a poolside demonstration of the FUNcube-1
satellite which was launched in November 2013. Using a computer,
FUNcube SDR dongle and a turnstile antenna, held by Kjetil Toresen
LA8KV, he received FUNcube-1 and displayed the telemetry data on the
computer screen. The satellite’s telemetry beacon on 145.935 MHz was
also heard using a handheld SSB receiver.

A presentation was also made about Hamnet which is being expanded,
especially in Germany. Hamnet is a high-speed multimedia network and
it was discussed whether and how IARU Region 1 could support the
expansion of this network.

Post by Mats SM6EAN in Swedish
http://www.ssa.se/iaru-reg-1-dag-4/

FUNcube
http://FUNc ube.org.uk/

FUNcube SDR Dongle
http://FUNcubeDongle.com/

FUNcube Yahoo Group
http://amsat-uk.org/funcube/yahoo-group/

Dashboard App – Telemetry Decoder
http://funcube.org.uk/working-documents/funcube-telemetry-dashboa rd/

Data Warehouse – Telemetry Archive
http://warehouse.funcube.org.uk/

Hamnet
http://hamnetdb .net/

IARU Region 1 Conference documents and pictures
http://iarur1con2014.bfra.bg/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

* Friday and Saturday, 16-17 January 2015 – Cowtown Hamfest in Forest
Hill TX (south of Fort Worth)

* Saturday, 14 February 2015 – presentation for the Greater Los
Angeles Mensa Regional Gathering 2015 in Los Angeles CA (Concourse
Hotel at Los Angeles International Airport)

* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 February 2015 – Yuma Hamfest in Yuma AZ
(Yuma County Fairgrounds, 32nd Street between Pacific Avenue & Avenue
3E, south of I-8 exit 3)

* Saturday, 7 March 2015 – Irving Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Irving TX (west of Dallas)

* Friday and Saturday, 13-14 March 2015 – Green Country Hamfest in
Claremore OK (northeast of Tulsa)

* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 March 2015 – Acadiana Hamfest in Rayne
LA (west of Lafayette)

* Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Weatherford Hamfest in Weatherford TX
(west of Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex)

* Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Scottsdale AZ (northeast of Phoenix, near AZ-101/Princess Drive)

* Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ (22nd
Street, east of Columbus Blvd.)

* Friday, 3 April 2015 – presentation for the Associated Radio
Amateurs of Long Beach in Signal Hill CA (Signal Hill Community
Center)

* Saturday TBD in early May 2015 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association
Hamfest in Sierra Vista AZ

* Saturday TBD in early June 2015 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show
Low AZ

* Friday and Saturday, 12-13 June 2015 – HAM-COM in Irving TX (west
of Dallas)

* Friday and Saturday, 7-8 August 2015 – Austin Summerfest in Austin
TX

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

ARISS News

+ A direct contact with students at Richmond Heights Middle School
and at BioTECH @ Richmond Heights High School in Miami, Florida, USA
via W1HQL was successful Thu 2015-01-15 16:09:40 UTC 46 deg.
Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF answered 12 questions for an
audience of 400 students.

RICHMOND HEIGHTS MIDDLE SCHOOL

Richmond Heights Middle School opened its doors in 1963 in the
Richmond Heights community in southwest Miami, Florida. The now 50
year old school, is located in a historic African American Community.
An army captain by the name of Frank C. Martin believed it to be a
wise investment as well as the right thing to do to establish a
housing development in which Black veterans of WWII could purchase
their own home. There are currently 636 students and a teaching
staff of 41 faculty members. Along with its exemplary athletics
program, full time gifted program, and Cambridge program, Richmond
Heights Middle School offers a Zoology Magnet program to the students
of Miami Dade County Public Schools. This is an extremely unique
magnet program that is one of only three in the nation. The zoology
magnet is a result of a partnership with Zoo Miami, the Zoological
Society of Florida and Richmond Heights Middle School. It has been
in existence since 1988. Students have the unique opportunity to
visit the zoo to study the animals within their exhibits while
engaging in STEM fields of study.

BIOTECH @ RICHMOND HEIGHTS 9-12 HIGH SCHOOL

BioTECH @ Richmond Heights 9-12 High School is the only Conservation
Biology public magnet high school is the United States and boasts
three campuses: our educational center at Richmond Campus, our
Research Station at Zoo Miami, and our Botanical Outpost at Fairchild
Tropical Botanic Garden. BioTECH provides students with a
challenging and advanced level math and science curriculum focused on
Conservation Biology that exposes them to rigorous STEM coursework as
well as research opportunities with practicing scientists in state-of-
the-art laboratories. In classes taken on-site at Zoo Miami,
students study the human impact on biological diversity, making
BioTECH the only school in the country to offer a full research and
teaching facility within zoo grounds. Research experiences are
offered in collaboration with the local zoo and the local research
and botanic garden. BioTECH is currently home to 130 students that
travel within the boundaries of a 467 square mile area to attend
this unique school. The school opened its doors in August 2014 with
a total of 8 faculty members, 7 support staff members, and
an arsenal of practicing scientists and conservation educators from
Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Zoo Miami, Zoological Society of
Florida, Everglades National Park, The Dumond Conservancy, and
Biscayne National Park.

1. How would astronauts combat disease, say an accidental
infection by a Salmonella culture, given the increased virulence of
microbes in space?

2. What kind of work is the crew doing in support of the future
missions to Mars?

3. We have a 3D printer in our school. What are the future
implications of having a 3D printer on-board? What types of prints
will you create?

4. Does experiencing a sunrise/sunset every 90 minutes change
your sleep/wake cycles?

5. Do you feel physical exhaustion in space at the end of your
work day? How long is your work day?

6. Without gravity, how do plants, such as Arabidopsis, determine
orientation germination? Geotropism what do roots do? Do plants on
the ISS grow in all different directions?

7. Do you feel stressed on the space station? How do you cope
with stress on a space station and does it have more or less of an
effect on your immune system in space? Measure muscle conditioning?

8. How are astronaut diets altered to accommodate the changes to
the digestive system in microgravity?

9. All work and no play can be boring. What do you do for fun up
in space?

10. How do you keep from feeling trapped in the space station?

11. What role did your education play in becoming an astronaut?

12. Which teacher influenced you the most in your life and why?

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

+ A direct contact with high school students at Japanese Broadcasting
Corporation (NHK) headquarters in Shibuya, Japan in connection with
their “Masakame” event is scheduled for
Sat 2015-01-24 14:21:04 UTC 56 deg.

Japan’s NHK is televising a regular science program “Masakame” for
young people. (“Masakame” means Good Heavens.) They are planning to
offer a special program around the ARISS contact, which will be
video recorded, and Amateur Radio satellites on air on February 28.

The following contacts with RSØISS:

+ A direct contact with students in Kursk, Russia scheduled for
Wed 2014-12-24 has been postponed until January.
+ A direct contact with students in Kursk, Russia scheduled for
Thu 2014-12-25 has been postponed until January.

No additional information has been provided.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

——————————————- ————————–

Satellite Shorts From All Over

73 on 73 Award #7 – EA4AYW

Congratulations to Jorge Gallardo Sanchez, EA4AYW, for becoming the
seventh recipient of the 73 on 73 Award. He submitted a list of 73
stations worked via AO-73 between September 1, 2014 and
January 9, 2015.

For more information on the award see
http://amsat-uk.org/funcube/73-on-73-award/

[ANS thanks Paul, N8HM for the above information]

—————————————————- —————–

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-011

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Dayton to Host 2015 AMSAT Space Symposium Oct 16-18
* Space Station Crew Available for Interviews Live from Orbiting
Laboratory
* NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships
* Dariusz Dabek, SP9TTX Earns 6th 73 on 73 Award
* Next US ARISS Contact Proposal Window opens February 15
* FUNcube-2 on UKube-1 – Jan 2015 update
* SHIN-EN2 Designated as Fuji Oscar 82
* FOX Challenge Coins Still Available
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over
SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-011.01
ANS-011 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 011.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE January 11, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-011.01
Dayton to Host 2015 AMSAT Space Symposium Oct 16-18

Mark Your Calendars !!

AMSAT NA announces that the 2015 AMSAT Space Symposium will be held
on Friday through Sunday, Oct 16, 17, 18, 2015 in Dayton, Ohio.

Location will be at the Crowne Plaza , 33 East 5th Street, in
Downtown, Dayton.
The Crown Plaza is a 3.5 star Hotel which has been recently renovated.

Some of the perks include
+ Free parking for attendees (with validation from the hotel).
+ Free transportation to and from the airport and within 5 miles of
hotel for side trips.
+ Several restaurants are in close proximity and within walking
distance.
+ Several alternate activities and attractions are in the Dayton area.
Air Force Museum
Mendelsons
R&L,
Historical Carillon Park
America’s Packard Museum
Local PBS Station, Think TV
+ If you are staying longer in the Dayton area, there are several
other points of interest close by.

2015 AMSAT Space Symposium and Annual Meeting

The annual AMSAT Space Symposium features:

+ Space Symposium with Amateur Satellite Presentations
+ Operating Techniques, News, & Plans from the Amateur Satellite
World
+ Board of Directors Meeting open to AMSAT members
+ Opportunities to Meet Board Members and Officers
+ AMSAT-NA Annual General Membership Meeting
+ Annual Banquet, Keynote Speaker and Door Prizes !!

Several members from The Dayton Amateur Radio Assn as well as many
other local clubs will be participating in helping with this event.

Additional information about the 2015 AMSAT Symposium will be posted
on the AMSAT web site, www.amsat.org, as it becomes available.

[ANS thanks Steve Coy K8UD and the AMSAT Office for the above
information]
———————————————————————
Space Station Crew Available for Interviews Live from Orbiting
Laboratory

Crew members of Expedition 42, currently aboard the International
Space Station, are available for live interviews with media and
social media during their mission aboard the orbital laboratory.

Space station commander Barry Wilmore and Flight Engineer Terry
Virts of NASA and European Space Agency Flight Engineer Samantha
Cristoforetti are on board the station along with their three Russian
crewmates, performing scientific research, demonstrating technology
and maintaining the complex.

Interviews will be offered in windows of 10 minutes. Interview
opportunities will be evaluated based on media audience size, and
relevance to current station activities and individual astronauts
aboard the space station. All three crewmembers may not be available
for every interview.

Interested media should contact Rob Navias at NASA’s Johnson Space
Center in Houston at rob.navias-1@nasa.gov and provide a two-hour
window of availability between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST, Monday through
Friday.

The crew also is available for interactive, social media events that
have the potential to reach significant audiences. All social media
platforms will be considered, but interviewers must meet the same
requirements as traditional media. No direct web connection to the
space station is available for conducting social media interviews.

To schedule a live social media interview, media should contact
Megan Sumner at megan.c.sumner@nasa.gov, and provide a two-hour
window of availability.

Actual dates and times for each interview will be provided to
approved media approximately two weeks before the interview date and
are subject to change or cancellation based on operational activity
aboard the station.

Television clients will use NASA Television Media Channel 103 to
conduct the interviews. Print, radio and internet media must conduct
the interviews using a land-line telephone connection and have an
additional telephone connection of any type for coordination. All
interviews will be broadcast live on NASA TV. Further technical
information will be provided to all media upon interview approval.

The International Space Station is a convergence of science,
technology and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies
and makes research breakthroughs not possible on Earth. The space
station has had continuous human occupation since November 2000. In
that time, it has received more than 200 visitors and a variety of
international and commercial spacecraft. The space station remains
the springboard to NASA’s next great leap in human space exploration.

Satellite tuning information is available at:
http://go.nasa.gov/1pOWUhR

For information about the International Space Station, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/station

Source NASA Media Advisory M15-005:
http://tinyurl.com/ANS011-ISSinterviews

[ANS thanks NASA for the above information]]
———————————————————————
NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and
graduate students for summer and fall 2015 internships. The History
Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research
questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all
levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and
publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a
large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior
knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a
keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are
needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential.
Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a
variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history
Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing
research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and
captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2015 internships are due Feb. 1, 2015. Fall
2015 internship applications are due June 1, 2015.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill
Barry at
bill dot barry at nasa.gov.

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message for Jan. 8, 2015 for the
above information]
———————————————————————
Dariusz Dabek, SP9TTX Earns 6th 73 on 73 Award

Congratulations to Dariusz Dabek, SP9TTX, for becoming the
sixth recipient of the 73 on 73 Award. He submitted a list of 78
stations worked via AO-73 between September 1, 2014 and January 3,
2015.

Reviewing the recent log submissions for the award, it appears that
the full time transponder activation over the holiday season
attracted several new users to the satellite.

Paul Stoetzer N8HM is sponsoring the award for contacts made via the
AO-73 (FUNcube-1) amateur radio satellite.

1. Work 73 unique stations on AO-73.
2. Contacts must be made on or after September 1, 2014.
3. There are no geographic restrictions on your operating location.

There will be no cost for this award (donations to AMSAT-UK and
AMSAT-NA’s Fox program are encouraged though).

No QSL cards are required. When you complete the requirements, email
your log extract including the callsign of each station worked, time
GMT, and date to n8hm@arrl.net as well as the address where you’d
like the award certificate sent.

For more information on the award see
http://amsat-uk.org/funcube/73-on-73-award/

[ANS thanks Paul Stoetzer N8HM for the above information]
———————————————————————
Next US ARISS Contact Proposal Window opens February 15

The next call for proposals for US entities to host an ARISS contact
is coming up in February, 2015.

Call for Proposals

Proposal Window February 15 – April 15, 2015
The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
Program is seeking formal and informal education institutions and
organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates
that the contact would be held between January 1, 2016 and June 30,
2016. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact
contact dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS
is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of
participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
education plan.
The deadline to submit a proposal is April 15, 2015.

The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will
participate in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts
are approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students and
educators to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-
answer session. An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication
opportunity via Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts
aboard the space station and classrooms and communities. ARISS
contacts afford education audiences the opportunity to learn
firsthand from astronauts what it is like to live and work in space
and to learn about space research conducted on the ISS. Students
also will have an opportunity to learn about satellite
communication, wireless technology, and radio science. Because of
the nature of human spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling
activities aboard the ISS, organizations must demonstrate
flexibility to accommodate changes in contact dates and times.
Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space
agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this
educational opportunity by providing the equipment and operational
support to enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and
students around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program
is managed by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and ARRL
(American Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA.

More Information

Interested parties can find more information about the program at
www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS. More details on expectations,
audience, proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times
of Information Sessions are available at
http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact

Please direct any questions to ariss@arrl.org.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]
———————————————————————
FUNcube-2 on UKube-1 – Jan 2015 update

Limited testing of the FUNcube-2 435/145 MHz linear transponder on
the UKube-1 spacecraft has been undertaken during the recent holiday
period.

This testing has shown that the transponder is able to work
effectively and that it is capable of a similar performance to the
transponder already operating on FUNcube-1.

AMSAT-UK and the FUNcube team have now submitted a detailed report
on the testing to the UK Space Agency, who are the owners and prime
operators of the UKube-1 spacecraft. It is expected that a meeting
will be held with them late January or early February to plan
possible future testing and operations.

Reception of UKube-1 FUNcube-2 Beacon
http://tinyurl.com/ANS011-FuncubeBeacon

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
SHIN-EN2 Designated as Fuji Oscar 82

William A. (Bill) Tynan, W3XO, OSCAR Number Administrator has
confered on SHIN-EN2 the designation Fuji OSCAR-82 or FO-82.

In reply to Seiji Fukushima’s, JH6RTO, request for an OSCAR number,
Bill said, “I along with all in AMSAT-NA and the world’s Amateur
Radio satellite community congratulate you and all involved with Fuji
OSCAR-82 and trust that it will fulfill all of its mission
objectives. FO-82 joins an illustrious line of Fuji spacecraft built
and launched by Japan.”

Shin-En2 is a 17 kg satellite measuring 490×490×475 mm built by
students at Kagoshima University in Japan which will carry a 145 to
435 MHz linear transponder into a deep space orbit.

The aims of the mission are:
• To establish communication technologies with a long range as far
as moon.
• To establish a new technology of the ultra-light-weight satellite.
Proposing a WSJT 29dBm UHF downlink and a 29dBm 20 kHz linear
transponder and a CW beacon all on UHF with a VHF uplink for the
transponder

The orbit will be quite different from the previous satellites. Shin-
En2 will have an elliptic orbit around the Sun and travel to a deep
space orbit between Venus and Mars. Its inclination will be almost
zero, which means Shin-En2 will stay in the Earth’s equatorial plane.

The distance from the Sun will be between 0.7 and 1.3 AU. An
Astronomical Unit (AU) is 149,597,871 km.

Shin-En2 IARU coordinated frequencies:
• 437.505 MHz CW beacon
• 437.385 MHz WSJT telemetry
• Inverting SSB/CW transponder
– 145.940-145.960 MHz uplink LSB
– 435.280-435.260 MHz downlink USB

Shin-En2 launched in the 4th quarter of 2014 with another amateur
radio satellite, ARTSAT2:DESPATCH, on a H-IIA rocket with the
asteroid explorer Hayabusa 2 as the main payload.

Kagoshima University satellite development team
http://tinyurl.com/Kagoshima-Satellite

Shin-En2 English Website
http://www.eee.kagoshima-u.ac.jp/~fuku-lab/sinen,english.html

ARTSAT2:DESPATCH – Art and Ham Radio in Deep Space
http://amsat-uk.org/2013/11/03/art-and-ham-radio-in-deep-space/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA and AMSAT-UK for the above Information]
———————————————————————
FOX Challenge Coins Still Available

It’s a new year, and hopefully we have all recovered from the
holidays. Here at AMSAT Fox fundraising HQ, we are busy packing up
the new batch of coins that came in over the holidays, to ship to our
generous donors. This year will see the launches of Fox-1A and -1C,
both carrying university experiments and VHF/UHF ham radio repeaters.
Help us keep ham radio in space with your donation and sharing our
FundRazr link via social media.
http://www.amsat.org/?p=3275

The Fox program is designed to provide a platform for university
experiments in space, as well as provide FM repeater capability for
radio amateurs worldwide. Fox-1A and 1C are set to launch in 2015,
and Fox-1B (also known as RadFXSat) is awaiting NASA ELANA launch
assignment. Further information on the Fox project can be found at
http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=1113.

[ANS thanks Drew KO4MA for the above Information]
———————————————————————
Successful ARISS Contacts with three Italian schools

Contacts with 3 Italian schools Friday January 9, 2015 were
successful. The events included students at Scuola Santa Teresa del
Bambin Gesù, Roma, Italy, direct via IKØUSO, students at Istituto
Salesiano Villa Sora, Frascati, Italy, direct via IWØCZC, and
students at Scuola Pontificia Pio IX, Roma, Italy, via telebridge
with IK1SLD. The contact was with Samantha Cristoforetti using the
callsign IRØISS the contact began 10:14:09 UTC, which is 11:14:09
CEWT.

The downlink was audible in Europe on 145.800MHz FM.

Images of event taken at Scuola Pontificia Pio IX, Roma:
https://www.flickr.com/gp/82104276@N02/xvhd78/

Audio of both contacts established per direct/telebridge today:

Schools represented:

Scuola Santa Teresa del Bambino Gesù
The school “Santa Teresa del Bambino Gesù” is a catholic primary
school in Rome, established to answer to the needs and demands for
Catholic education by the local population. The school belongs to the
Congregation of Missionary Carmelitane Sisters of Saint Therese of
Jesus Child. The school is open to families that take care of the
religious education and formation of their children. Preparation for
the ISS radio contact has been underway for a long time, including
educational projects on different scientific topics to support the
special event.

Istituto Salesiano Villa Sora
Villa Sora is located on the side of the ancient Roman boulevard
(now Via Tuscolana) in an area known as Tusculanus ager, which is
full of sumptuous villas, including those of Cicero, Lucullus and
Sulpicius Galba. This villa was built as a country house in the same
grounds of Lucullus` villa in the mid-16th century and it was
originally known as ‘Torricella’. The earliest documentation of its
history dates back to 1546, when the Chapel of Sancta Sanctorum of
Rome owned the villa. The land currently measures over 6 acres and
includes, in addition to the house and the school, a large park with
several building lots.

The school of Villa Sora has a notable historical tradition. Since
1925, it has a primary school and a liceo classico. The liceo
scientifico was founded in 1966 and in 1986 its admission was opened
to girls. In 1989, the middle school was created, and finally, in
2011, a new liceo economico sociale was founded. The middle school
now has 200 students divided in three classes. The liceo classico has
180 students, the liceo scientifico 280 and the liceo economico
sociale 80, for a total of 740 students.

The space conversation was conducted in Italian. The following 20
questions were answered by Samantha Cristoforetti as well as
greetings and wishes before LOS. This was amazing as Samantha
responded very exhaustively and with many details.

Translation:

1. The time of the re-entry into the atmosphere seems to be less
evolved. There are studies underway to modify or change this stage?
2. How long does it take to arrive on the international space station?
3. What is the equipment of the astronaut during extra vehicular
activity?
4. What kind of material is made the surface that covers the lower
part of the spacecraft re-entry?
5. How many km / h you travel to reach the international space
station?
6. The extra vehicular activities that you will do will umbilical or
free? What goals and how they will be held?
7. How does the deceleration during re-entry?
8. The control of the flight on the Soyuz is automatic or are you a
pilot?
9. How does the return to the international space station after an
extra vehicular activity?
10. After take-off part of the missile is dispersed in space?
11. Which angle is formed between the trajectory of the spacecraft
and the Earth’s surface during re-entry? What are the risks an
angle of re-entry is not correct?
12. Samantha, you are the first Italian woman to do extra vehicular
activity. What are your feelings and what your concerns about it?
13. What happens to take off when passing through the Earth’s
atmosphere?
14. During the return to earth, how much gravitational force suffer
the astronauts?
15. There is the possibility of accidents during extra vehicular
activity?
16. When it takes off there is a lot of turbulence?
17. Why do astronauts after the mission should go in quarantine?
What happens at the neurological level?
18. How do you prepare for extra vehicular activity? What is the
training and simulations?
19. It was more exciting to enter into the international space
station or the time of takeoff?
20. How do you manage to fit into a specific point on the earth,
without risk to human life and the environment?

ARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering
the participating space agencies, NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA,
CNES, JAXA, and CSA, with the AMSAT and IARU organizations from
participating countries.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the
excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers
onboard the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and
communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS
can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology and learning.

[ANS thanks Gaston ON4WF and Francesco IK0WGF, ARISS for the above
information]

ARISS News

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Richmond Heights Middle School, Miami, FL, anticipates a direct
contact via W1HQL, scheduled for Thursday 2015-01-15 16:09:40 UTC.
Because this is a reschedule due to the delay of the SpaceX resupply
mission timing depends on the the school confirming availability. As
of press time, ARISS was still awaiting word of the confirmation. The
downlink should be audible across the SE USA. The contact will be
held in English and is scheduled to be with Samantha Cristoforetti
IZØUDF using the callsign NA1SS.

RICHMOND HEIGHTS MIDDLE SCHOOL
Richmond Heights Middle School opened its doors in 1963 in the
Richmond Heights community in southwest Miami, Florida. The now 50
year old school, is located in a historic African American Community.
An army captain by the name of Frank C. Martin believed it to be a
wise investment as well as the right thing to do to establish a
housing development in which Black veterans of WWII could purchase
their own home. There are currently 636 students and a teaching
staff of 41 faculty members. Along with its exemplary athletics
program, full time gifted program, and Cambridge program, Richmond
Heights Middle School offers a Zoology Magnet program to the students
of Miami Dade County Public Schools. This is an extremely unique
magnet program that is one of only three in the nation. The zoology
magnet is a result of a partnership with Zoo Miami, the Zoological
Society of Florida and Richmond Heights Middle School. It has been
in existence since 1988. Students have the unique opportunity to
visit the zoo to study the animals within their exhibits while
engaging in STEM fields of study.

BIOTECH @ RICHMOND HEIGHTS 9-12 HIGH SCHOOL
BioTECH @ Richmond Heights 9-12 High School is the only Conservation
Biology public magnet high school is the United States and boasts
three campuses: our educational center at Richmond Campus, our
Research Station at Zoo Miami, and our Botanical Outpost at Fairchild
Tropical Botanic Garden. BioTECH provides students with a
challenging and advanced level math and science curriculum focused on
Conservation Biology that exposes them to rigorous STEM coursework as
well as research opportunities with practicing scientists in state-of-
the-art laboratories. In classes taken on-site at Zoo Miami,
students study the human impact on biological diversity, making
BioTECH the only school in the country to offer a full research and
teaching facility within zoo grounds. Research experiences are
offered in collaboration with the local zoo and the local research
and botanic garden. BioTECH is currently home to 130 students that
travel within the boundaries of a 467 square mile area to attend this
unique school. The school opened its doors in August 2014 with a
total of 8 faculty members, 7 support staff members, and an arsenal
of practicing scientists and conservation educators from Fairchild
Tropical Botanic Garden, Zoo Miami, Zoological Society of Florida,
Everglades National Park, The Dumond Conservancy, and Biscayne
National Park.

The following is the list of the anticipated questions:

1. How would astronauts combat disease, say an accidental infection
by a Salmonella culture, given the increased virulence of
microbes in space?
2. What kind of work is the crew doing in support of the future
missions to Mars?
3. We have a 3D printer in our school. What are the future
implications of having a 3D printer on-board? What types of
prints will you create?
4. Does experiencing a sunrise/sunset every 90 minutes change your
sleep/wake cycles?
5. Do you feel physical exhaustion in space at the end of your work
day? How long is your work day?
6. Without gravity, how do plants, such as Arabidopsis, determine
orientation germination? Geotropism what do roots do? Do plants
on the ISS grow in all different directions?
7. Do you feel stressed on the space station? How do you cope with
stress on a space station and does it have more or less of an
effect on your immune system in space? Measure muscle
conditioning?
8. How are astronaut diets altered to accommodate the changes to
the digestive system in microgravity?
9. All work and no play can be boring. What do you do for fun up
in space?
10. How do you keep from feeling trapped in the space station?
11. What role did your education play in becoming an astronaut?
12. Which teacher influenced you the most in your life and why?

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]
———————————————————————
Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ CQ To Combine Jan/Feb 2015 Issues

(Hicksville, NY, January 9, 2015) — CQ magazine today announced
that it will be publishing a combined January/February 2015 issue and
will be ceasing publication of its “CQ Plus” digital edition
supplement as of the March 2015 issue. Both moves are intended to
help restore the magazine’s normal schedule for its print edition and
to strengthen its foundations moving forward as it enters its eighth
decade of publication, said Publisher Dick Ross, K2MGA. “These
decisions were not made lightly,” he added, “but in recognition of
the realities of the publishing industry. It’s a tough time to be in
the magazine business, and we appreciate the patience and loyalty of
both our readers and our advertisers.”

CQ will continue to publish both print and digital editions, but the
digital edition will no longer contain the 50-60 additional pages
each month that constituted “CQ Plus.” Editor Rich Moseson, W2VU,
noted that he hopes to include some former CQ Plus content within the
pages of CQ, but says ham radio will remain the magazine’s primary
focus, as it has been for the past seven decades. CQ is marking its
70th anniversary of publication as of its January/February issue.

As a consequence of the changes, CQ Plus Editor Richard Fisher,
KI6SN, will be leaving the CQ staff after serving for many years as a
columnist for, and then as editor of, Popular Communications,
WorldRadio Online and CQ Plus. He was also CQ magazine’s Emergency
Communications Editor. “We will miss Richard’s many contributions to
CQ’s products,” noted Moseson, “and thank him for his many years of
service to our readers.”

Subscribers to both the print and digital editions of CQ will have
their subscriptions extended by one month due to the combined
January/February issue.

CQ <www.cq-amateur-radio.com> is the world’s leading independent
amateur radio magazine, serving the amateur radio community worldwide
since 1945. It is published in three languages (English, Spanish and
Portuguese) and in both print and digital formats.

[ANS thanks Rich Moseson, W2VU, CQ Magazine for the above information]
———————————————————————
/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-004

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* W5PFG/P Northern Maine Grid Expedition
* Opportunities to Help at AMSAT User Services
* Design The Next AMSAT Satellite!
* 73 on 73 Award #5 – EC4TR
* Geosynchronous Es’hail-2 with Amateur Payload Contracted for 2016 Launch
* DESPATCH FO-81 Concludes Operations

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-004.01
ANS-004 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 004.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
January 4, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-004.01

W5PFG/P Northern Maine Grid Expedition

Weather permitting, a grid expedition to northern Maine will begin Saturday,
January 10, 2015.  Planned grids will be: FN53-54, FN57, FN65-67. The plan is
to try to operate as many satellite passes and gridlines as possible in the same
fashion as AC0RA’s March 2014 trip.  The trip will end up in FN42 by Sunday,
January 11 evening.

Twitter via @w5pfg will be the primary form of communications with
follow-up afterwards with some pictures at www.w5pfg.us.

[ANS thanks Clayton, W5PFG, for the above  information]

———————————————————————

Opportunities to Help at AMSAT User Services

AMSAT’s User Services Department is recruiting for several volunteer
positions to augment our dedicated and elite staff! The User Services
Department provides support in several areas including:

+ AMSAT News Service
+ The AMSAT Journal magazine
+ AMSAT’s web presence at www.amsat.org

The AMSAT News Service
———————–
We need two or more volunteers to step forward who can dedicate time on a
rotating shift of news editors. The AMSAT News Service (ANS) sends out a
weekly news bulletin of everything of interest to amateur radio in space.
The entire ANS crew (currently 3 editors) helps round up the news and each
ANS editor takes a week as editor to compile the week’s ANS bulletins. We’ll
get you into the bulletin rotation and you’ll take your turn as the ANS
editor this week.

The AMSAT Journal Magazine
————————–
We need two or more volunteers who can help compile one of AMSAT’s key
membership benefits … The AMSAT Journal Magazine. An assistant editor is
needed to help our existing team of editors (currently 3) to locate articles
and establish contact with potential authors. All you need is an eye for
articles of interest to amateur radio in space. You’ll compile input from
AMSAT HQ, volunteer authors, and amateur radio news sources into articles
for publication in our bi-monthly magazine.

We also need one volunteer who is capable of assuming the position of
editor-in-chief of the AMSAT Journal. You’ll help develop article sources
and using AMSAT provided software and templates compile the 32-page magazine
for six issues per year. Our publishing system is the Adobe InDesign CS6
package. This can be learned quickly by any computer literate ham. InDesign
is MS-Word on steroids.

AMSAT’s Web Presence
——————–
Help is needed on the front to locate and publish up to date content for the
AMSAT web. We publish late breaking news of amateur radio in space. We also
publish reference information to help operate on the satellites …
software, radios, antennas, operating techniques. Web content containing
late-breaking operating news and reliable operator tips currently has
several gaps needing to be filled. Our WordPress environment makes the web
display easy but you’ll be spending your volunteer time on the content. This
is a job for 5 or more volunteers and needs to be filled immediately!

AMSAT also is looking for a webmaster who will assume responsibility for the
display of all content in a WordPress environment. The basic framework is in
place but can definitely stand to be fine tuned and made into a world class
display of amateur radio in space. For most hams on-line www.amsat.org is
our “front door” and we are looking for the most capable help on this
important user interface!

Our team is the “voice of AMSAT”. News, operator tips, and membership
benefits are important products for AMSAT User Services. For questions or to
volunteer please contact AMSAT’s Vice President of User Services, JoAnne
Maenpaa, K9JKM at k9jkm@amsat.org

[ANS thanks AMSAT Vice President of User Services, JoAnne Maenpaa, K9JKM for
the above information]

———————————————————————

Design The Next AMSAT Satellite!

At the 2014 AMSAT Space Symposium AMSAT Vice President – Engineering
Jerry Buxton announced the plan for the next generation of AMSAT
satellites. “The door is open for everyone, to submit their ideas.
AMSAT Engineering has a long term strategy and this is the first
step.”

The Engineering long term strategy includes the following goals:
– Advancement of amateur radio satellite technical and communications skills
– Enhance international goodwill
– Grow and sustain a skilled pool of amateur radio satellite engineers
– Establish and maintain partnerships with educational institutions
– Develop a means to use hardware common to all opportunities

With respect to the last goal Jerry said “Within the bounds of the
type of satellite it takes to achieve any of the various orbit
opportunities, let’s consider in those plans the possibility of
developing a platform that can suit any and all orbits. Perhaps a
modular CubeSat, using a common bus as we did in Fox-1, which gives
great flexibility in building and flying different sizes and
configurations of CubeSats with simple common-design hardware
changes.”

Submissions should be thorough and contain the following
information. The purpose of the proposal is not just in suggesting an
idea; being an all-volunteer team AMSAT needs your help in carrying
out the idea.

Design Implementation – CubeSat platform Estimated timeline Cost –
volunteer resources, commercial (COTS) units Launch – how does it get
to orbit Strategy – how it fits into AMSAT’s Engineering long term
strategy

As mentioned above the idea should be based on the CubeSat platform.
This is the standard through which we will look for launches in the
foreseeable future.

In considering your proposal, Jerry encourages you to contact him
for more details on the criteria. A guidebook to the criteria is now
available for download here. In particular, if you plan to include a
university as a partner to provide experiments or other support and
you are not representing that university, please contact Jerry for
assistance in working with our existing partners or establishing a
new partnership.

“Being amateur radio operators, it is easy for us to fall into a
particular trap because of our history of communicating with other
amateurs throughout the world” says Jerry. “Specifically, most people
who are not already involved in the world of satellite technology are
unaware of or simply overlook the provisions of the current ITAR and
soon to be EAR export rules particularly with regard to deemed
exports which requires governmental permission to discuss satellite
projects with foreign nationals.”

While all amateurs are invited to submit ideas, U.S. amateurs must
take particular care of they choose to become involved in a
collaboration which includes individuals from other countries. It is
permissible to receive ideas and proposals from outside the U.S., but
it is not permitted for U.S. Persons to export or share design ideas
with other countries unless they have taken the proper steps to
insure compliance with ITAR and deemed export rules.

Additionally, those wishing to work on proposals should use care in
presenting themselves in their contacts. While the goal is for AMSAT
to build and launch the satellite, it is not an AMSAT project until
it is accepted by the AMSAT Board of Directors. It is acceptable to
represent yourself as members of a project team that plans to submit
a proposal to AMSAT for a future satellite project, as the AMSAT name
is well known.

“It is not our intention that ideas be submitted to AMSAT-NA which
would be more appropriately handled by an AMSAT organization in a
country where AMSAT is established. AMSAT-NA is seeking ideas from
amateurs in North America and will certainly consider ideas from
amateurs in countries which do not have an established AMSAT
organization or relationships with an existing AMSAT organization.”

The deadline for submissions is May 30, 2015. After the submission
date the ideas will be screened for completeness and then reviewed by
a board consisting of the AMSAT Engineering Team, AMSAT Senior
Officer and Board of Directors representatives, and aerospace
industry members. The review board may modify or consolidate ideas
and will consider which meet the criteria to become a project based
on feasibility, cost, and the ability to bring value to the amateur
satellite community. The review process is expected to be completed
in September 2015.

For those ideas selected to become a project which satisfy the
requirements for an ELaNa launch, the idea authors will be asked to
work with the AMSAT Engineering Team on an ELaNa proposal.

The Engineering Team will then work on the details of execution for
the selected project(s) and present a proposal to the AMSAT Board of
Directors in October 2015 for final approval to begin work. Once
approved, any ELaNa proposals will be submitted in November 2015 and
the project(s) will move forward.

Now is the time for YOU to begin working on the next AMSAT satellite!

[ANS thanks Jerry, N0JY, for the above information

———————————————————————

73 on 73 Award #5 – EC4TR

Congratulations to Jose Luis Peña Sanchez, EC4TR, for becoming the
fifth recipient of the 73 on 73 Award. He submitted a list of 73
stations worked via AO-73 between September 1, 2014 and December 31,
2014.

For more information on the award see
http://amsat-uk.org/funcube/73-on-73-award/

[ANS thanks Paul, N8HM, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Geosynchronous Es’hail-2 with Amateur Payload Contracted for 2016 Launch

The new satellite will be positioned at 26° East. In September 2014, a contract
with MELCO was signed to build the satellite based on the DS-2000 bus. In
December 2014, a launch contract was signed with SpaceX to launch the satellite
on a Falcon-9 v1.1 booster in late 2016.

Es’hail 2 will also provide the first Amateur Radio geostationary communication
capability linking Brazil and India. It will carry two “Phase 4″ Amateur Radio
transponders. The payload will consist of a 250 kHz linear transponder intended
for conventional analogue operations in addition to another transponder which
will have an 8 MHz bandwidth. The latter transponder is intended for
experimental digital modulation schemes and DVB amateur television. The uplinks
will be in the 2.400-2.450 GHz and the downlinks in the 10.450-10.500 GHz
amateur satellite service allocations. Both transponders will have broad beam
antennas to provide full coverage over about third of the earth’s surface. The
Qatar Amateur Radio Society and Qatar Satellite Company are cooperating on the
amateur radio project. AMSAT-DL is providing technical support to the project.

[ANS thanks Gunter Krebs for the above information]

———————————————————————

DESPATCH FO-81 Concludes Operations

The following update was provided by Akihiro Kubota.

One month has past since Deep Space Sculpture “ARTSAT2:DESPATCH(FO-81)”
was put into an Earth-escape orbit as a piggyback payload of H-IIA F26
launched at December 3, 2014 from Tanegashima Space Center, JAXA. It is
estimated to have stopped sending radio waves since the battery of
DESPATCH already ran out (We predicted that the battery will work for 27
days according to the running time of the transmitter).

Today January 3, the main control station, Tama Art University Ground
Station, decided to conclude the operation of DESPATCH. Many people
supported and cooperated us throughout the design and development of
DESPATCH. In addition, many excellent many ham radio operator received
and reported super weak  radio waves of DESPATCH from deep space. To
have this opportunity, I would like once again to thank all of them very
much.

Reception reports of DESPATCH are summarized on the following page.

Reception Reports
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1WP-
FzXHe8axAzNy44SGbKpJqIRKWHAcIP9vXnaHMb6g/edit#gid=0

Finally, we had two reception reports at 4.7 million kilo-meters from
the Earth  (more than 12 times of the distance to the Moon). They were
far beyond what we expected. They are the the longest communication
distance in the world between two amateur radio stations.

Orbital elements of DESPATCH is as follows (J2000 heliocentric ecliptic
coordinates).

– Semi-major axis a : 1.003881127 [AU]
– Eccentricity e : 0.08741828512
– Inclination  i : 6.796995362 [deg]
– Argument of perihelion w : 96.90057903 [deg]
– Longitude of the ascending node W : 250.5520871 [deg]
– Mean anomaly at epoch  M : 101.6280436 [deg]
– Epoch  : 2457023.50000 [JD]
(Time of perihelion :  2456919.7870655278675 [JD])

cf. Orbital elements of EARTH :
http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/earthfact.html

Celestial sphere position and orbital trajectory of DESPATCH can be
checked anytime on the following web pages.

– Celestial Sphere
http://artsat.jp/project/despatch/celestial

– Orbital Position
http://artsat.jp/project/despatch/orbit

Transmission of the radio wave from DESPATCH has ended. However, the
life of DESPATCH as a sculpture around the sun is almost eternal.
We calculated the orbit (the distance from the Earth) of DESPATCH for
500 years from now.

http://artsat.jp/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/500years.png

http://artsat.jp/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/500years_large.png

DESPATCH will continue to orbit around the sun as an artificial
asteroid. By examining the calculated results for the local minimum
value of the distance between the Earth, DESPATCH will approaches to
less than 1 million km from Earth after about 350 years. Possibly it
will approach more closer to the Earth due to the interaction with
unpredictable other celestial bodies.

We are glad if you think of DESPATCH as the most distant artwork in the
world sometimes in the future.

ARTSAT project will continue to the future. We already started the
conceptual design of next ARTSAT3. We kindly ask for your continuous
support and cooperation for the project.

[ANS thanks Akihiro Kubota for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-362

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT Awards Update
* FUNcube-1 in full-time transponder mode
* NASA Cube Quest Challenge Summit Jan 7th & 8th
* AMSAT Events
* Russian ISS School Contacts
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-362.01
ANS-362 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 362.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE December 28, 2014
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-362.01

———————————————————————

AMSAT Awards Update

As 2014 draws to an end and we look at all the accomplishments hams
have made towards satellite operation and those that have entered the
satellite community I would like to thank all of those that have made
the year what it was. Those that took time off to travel and work
satellites from semi-rare and rare grid squares, those that operated
for the AO-7 special event, those that helped build, test and launch
satellites and especially those that nurture students in elementary
through college grades.

Here are our latest inductions into some of the AMSAT awards
community.

The following have entered into the Satellite Communicators Club for
making their first satellite QSO.

David Barholomew, AD7DB
John Bartholomew, N7JY
Walter Dilley, KD7DNY
Nicolas Romero, KG5BON

To see all the awards visit
http://www.amsat.org or
http://www.amsatnet.com/awards.html

Bruce Paige, KK5DO
AMSAT Director Contests and Awards
ARRL Awards Manager (WAS, 5BWAS, VUCC), VE
Houston AMSAT Net – Wed 0200z on Echolink – Conference *AMSAT*
Also streaming MP3 at
http://www.amsatnet.com

Podcast at
http://www.amsatnet.com/podcast.xml or iTunes

[ANS thanks the Bruce, KK5DO for the above information]

———————————————————————

FUNcube-1 in full-time transponder mode

On December 23 FUNcube-1 / AO-73 was switched into full-time
transponder mode with low-power beacon. It will remain in that mode
for the next 5-7 days.

Enjoy the transponder.

With best wishes for the Festive Season, and for 2015

FUNcube Team

[ANS thanks the FUNcube team and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

NASA Cube Quest Challenge Summit Jan 7th & 8th

The NASA Centennial Challenges Program and NASA Ames Research Center
are pleased to announce that the Cube Quest Challenge Summit will be
held January 7-8, 2015 at the NASA Ames Conference Center.

NASA Ames Conference Center
500 Severyns Road
Moffett Field, CA 94035
650.604.2082
http://naccenter.arc.nasa.gov/

This event will bring together NASA Centennial Challenges
administrators, invited NASA technical experts and presenters, and
the community of interested technical service providers and potential
competitor team members for the purposes of:

* To introduce the Cube Quest operating conditions, rules and
constraints
* To encourage potential competitors to self-organize into teams
* Foster dialog; raise understanding about this exciting competition
and opportunities
* Support the best possible competition

The event will be held:
January 7, 2015 from 1 p.m to 5 p.m (Registration Desk opens at 12:00
noon)
January 8, 2015 from 8 a.m to 12 p.m

See website for more information:
http://www.nasa.gov/cubequestsummit/#.VJ7twP8oMw

[ANS thanks NASA for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country.  Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

* Sunday, 4 January 2015 – Ham Radio University in Bethpage NY
(Briarcliffe College)

* Saturday, 10 January 2015 – Thunderbird Hamfest 2015 in Phoenix AZ
(43rd Avenue, between Greenway and Bell Roads)

* Friday and Saturday, 16-17 January 2015 – Cowtown Hamfest in Forest
Hill TX (south of Fort Worth)

* Saturday, 14 February 2015 – presentation for the Greater Los
Angeles Mensa Regional Gathering 2015 in Los Angeles CA (Concourse
Hotel at Los Angeles International Airport)

* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 February 2015 – Yuma Hamfest in Yuma AZ
(Yuma County Fairgrounds, 32nd Street between Pacific Avenue & Avenue
3E, south of I-8 exit 3)

* Saturday, 7 March 2015 – Irving Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Irving TX (west of Dallas)

* Friday and Saturday, 13-14 March 2015 – Green Country Hamfest in
Claremore OK (northeast of Tulsa)

* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 March 2015 – Acadiana Hamfest in Rayne
LA (west of Lafayette)

* Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Weatherford Hamfest in Weatherford TX
(west of Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex)

* Saturday, 21 March 2015 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Hamfest in
Scottsdale AZ (northeast of Phoenix, near AZ-101/Princess Drive)

* Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ (22nd
Street, east of Columbus Blvd.)

* Friday, 3 April 2015 – presentation for the Associated Radio
Amateurs of Long Beach in Signal Hill CA (Signal Hill Community
Center)

* Saturday TBD in early May 2015 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association
Hamfest in Sierra Vista AZ

* Saturday TBD in early June 2015 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show
Low AZ

* Friday and Saturday, 12-13 June 2015 – HAM-COM in Irving TX (west
of Dallas)

* Friday and Saturday, 7-8 August 2015 – Austin Summerfest in Austin
TX

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

Russian ISS School Contacts

Both Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB and Michal Zawada SQ5KTM have released
videos of ISS school contacts by cosmonaut Yelena Serov operating
with the callsign RS0ISS which took place on Sunday, December 21,
2014.

The amateur radio station in the Russian Service Module was used and
the Kenwood D710 operated on 145.800 MHz FM. The power setting used
is not clear but may have been 25 watts. It is understood that ISS
school contacts had been planned for Sunday with students at both
Ekaterinburg and Chelyabinsk.

In his blog Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB said of the first Chelyabinsk
contact: Radio session of the crew of the International Space Station
with a children’s art school in Chelyabinsk. With great difficulty
they contacted.

Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB Blog
http://tinyurl.com/R4UAB-B

AMSAT-UK
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/12/21/russian-iss-school-contacts/

[ANS thanks ARISS and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between About Gagarin From Space,
Amateur Session of The Parties  Centre Extracurricular Activities
Chelyabinsk, Chelyabinsk, Russia, direct via  R8AM
Contact was with RSØISS
Contact was successful 2014-12-21  11:55 UTC
(see above article)

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Kursk, Russia,  direct via TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is  postponed until 2015 January TBD UTC

Kursk, Russia, direct via  TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is postponed until 2015 January TBD  UTC

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

*Small CubeSat Provides Big Space Experience

Any way you slice it, space exploration — done right — requires
an inordinate range of technical expertise. From designing the
spacecraft, the mission proposal and the circuit boards to testing
the flight software and putting together budgets, sending something,
anything, into the cosmos depends on good people who know their job.

“Although significantly smaller in size, CubeSats contain analogous
payloads and subsystems to larger satellites and require similar
technical knowledge and resources to traditional flight projects,”
said Shannon Statham, an engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory
in Pasadena, California. “The training and experience gained by
working on CubeSats are directly applicable to larger missions.”

Only three years after receiving her graduate degree in engineering,
and having logged time in JPL’s Environmental Test Lab, Statham was
chosen to become the project manager for NASA’s Radiometer
Atmospheric CubeSat Experiment (RACE) mission. The position quickly
provided the Georgia Institute of Technology grad all the hands-on
experience she could have hoped for — and more.

“The core team for RACE was comprised of 15 early career hires,”
said Statham. “We each had our designated role, but we all wore many
hats and contributed to all aspects of taking the mission from
proposal, to design, to testing, to launch delivery. With a very
ambitious project schedule and budget, it’s what we had to do to get
the job done.”

RACE was a CubeSat, a small satellite no bigger than a loaf of
bread, designed to test components of an Earth-observing radiometer
that would be used in future missions by larger, more expensive
satellites. RACE was designed to “hitch a ride” aboard a rocket that
was already tasked with lofting a spacecraft to the International
Space Station. Once at the station, RACE would be set free to orbit
Earth as its own satellite, measuring the liquid water path and water
vapor that is pertinent to the water cycle and Earth’s energy budget
from 240 miles up.

“That is one of the beauties of CubeSats,” said Statham. “They are
small and compact, so placing them in the available nooks and
crannies of a rocket already set to carry another payload into space
can be quite cost-effective.”

When compared to its larger satellite siblings, just about
everything about CubeSats is diminutive. Even transporting them is
low-key. While their bigger brethren usually require a specially-
equipped, air-cushioned tractor trailer or perhaps a military cargo
plane, RACE made its way from the lab into the world via an attache-
sized box that Statham herself placed in the overhead compartment
above her airliner seat.

The RACE team had hoped to show their instrument’s performance could
rival that of traditional big satellites, resulting in potential cost
savings down the line. On the evening of October 28, 2014, Statham
and several other RACE early career hires watched as an Antares
rocket carrying their satellite lifted off from the Wallops Flight
Facility in Virginia. Moments into the flight, one of the rocket’s
main engines failed, sending its space station-destined payload
(including RACE) to a fiery end.

“The launch failure was a disappointment, but I think all of us know
that’s a risk you take,” said Statham. “We saw all our hard work
effectively go up in flames. But I think everyone on the team is
taking this as a very positive experience in general, and we’re all
moving on to new and exciting endeavors at JPL.”

Statham is sticking with CubeSats for the time being. She is working
on a JPL concept to fly a space-based radar called “RaInCube.” Others
on her team have gone on to other CubeSat projects, while still
others are working on more traditional space missions or in one of
the research labs at JPL.

And what of RACE itself? At the time of this writing, the 13.4-inch-
long (34-centimeter) spacecraft has not been recovered. But the
technology that Statham and her colleagues pushed from concept, to
test bed, to launch pad, lives on. The lessons learned developing the
radiometer, the instrument that was the heart of the RACE mission,
are being applied to a new CubeSat proposal called Temporal
Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems – Demonstrator (TEMPEST-D).

The next JPL CubeSat is scheduled to fly on January 29 of next year.
Called GEO-CAPE ROIC In-Flight Performance Experiment (GRIFEX), the
CubeSat will hitch a ride aboard the Soil Moisture Active-Passive
(SMAP) launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. GRIFEX is a
flight test of advanced technology required for future Earth
observers measuring atmospheric composition from geostationary Earth
orbit.

JPL has other CubeSat projects in development as well, including
missions to the moon, Mars and near-Earth asteroids. JPL recently
selected proposals from 10 universities to analyze CubeSat concepts
that could enhance a proposed Europa Clipper mission. The concepts
will be incorporated into a JPL study on how small probes could be
carried as auxiliary payloads.

“These tiny spacecraft are great platforms for increasing the
technology readiness of new technologies to buy down risk for larger
missions in a relatively short time frame and minimal budget. They
can also provide resources to larger missions with minimal impacts to
cost and mass,” said Statham. “The future looks bright for CubeSats.”

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Small_CubeSat_Provides_Big_Space_
Experience_999.html

[ANS thanks Spacedaily.com for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-355

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Worked All USA Grids Via Satellite – #488 for Doug Papay, KD8CAO
* Opportunities to Help at AMSAT User Services
* 73 on 73 Award #4 – EA5TT
* Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF, Reflects on Her First ARISS Contact
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-355.01
ANS-355 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 355.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE December 21, 2014
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-355.01

Worked All USA Grids Via Satellite – #488 for Doug Papay, KD8CAO

Congratulations to Doug Papay, KD8CAO for working grid #488 of the
488 USA grids. Doug worked N2COP/p, in FM13, for his final grid. The
contact was via SO-50 and was logged on 15/Dec/2014 @ 1252Z.

For his efforts he has been granted GRID MASTER award # 2.

In a recent AMSAT-BB email exchange with Damon Runion WA4HFN, Doug
said of his accomplishment, “…it certainly would not have been
possible without the help of the many individuals that went to extra
effort to activate so many rare grids.  These include those who
recently helped put the last 30 or so girds in the log: my father
K8YSE, Tom KA6SIP, Denny WB8K, Bill N2COP, Ron N8RO, Craig KL4E, Ed
WA7ETH, Steven KF7SLV, Wyatt AC0RA, and Clayton W5PFG.  Special
recognition goes to my father K8YSE, Jim ND9M, Patrick WD9EWK, and
Ted AA5CK for having been major contributors over the years  to this
accomplishment.  I’m sure there are may more that I have not
mentioned, and so I’m thankful for every effort, every contact is
appreciated!

“I also want to thank Rick WA4NVM for the heads-up via text from my
father K8YSE about FM13 on Sunday morning–while I missed Bill N2COP
that day, this head’s-up gave the motivation to be at the radio on
Monday morning, and sure enough Bill was there and the contact was
logged.   Without these guys watching out for me I would have missed
the grid yet again.  (Thanks Rick!).”

The Star Comm Group sponsors the Grid Master Award. To qualify for
this award you must make a satellite contact with all 488 grids in
the U.S. and get confirmation. Send your information to Ricky, WA4NVM
or Damon, WA4HFN. All Star Comm Group awards are free, they only ask
that you make a donation to AMSAT NA.

Grid Master Award #1 was awarded to Doug’s father, John Papay, K8YSE.

More information on the Grid Master and other Star Comm Group awards
can be found at:
http://www.starcommgroup.org/

[ANS thanks the Star Comm Group  and Doug KD8CAO for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Opportunities to Help at AMSAT User Services

AMSAT’s User Services Department is recruiting for several volunteer
positions to augment our dedicated and elite staff! The User Services
Department provides support in several areas including:

+ AMSAT News Service
+ The AMSAT Journal magazine
+ AMSAT’s web presence at www.amsat.org

The AMSAT News Service
———————–
We need two or more volunteers to step forward who can dedicate time
on a rotating shift of news editors. The AMSAT News Service (ANS)
sends out a weekly news bulletin of everything of interest to amateur
radio in space.

The entire ANS crew (currently 3 editors) helps round up the news
and each ANS editor takes a week as editor to compile the week’s ANS
bulletins. We’ll get you into the bulletin rotation and you’ll take
your turn as the ANS editor this week.

The AMSAT Journal Magazine
————————–
We need two or more volunteers who can help compile one of AMSAT’s
key membership benefits … The AMSAT Journal Magazine. An assistant
editor is needed to help our existing team of editors (currently 3)
to locate articles and establish contact with potential authors. All
you need is an eye for articles of interest to amateur radio in
space. You’ll compile input from AMSAT HQ, volunteer authors, and
amateur radio news sources into articles for publication in our bi-
monthly magazine.

We also need one volunteer who is capable of assuming the position
of editor-in-chief of the AMSAT Journal. You’ll help develop article
sources and using AMSAT provided software and templates compile the
32-page magazine for six issues per year. Our publishing system is
the Adobe InDesign CS6 package. This can be learned quickly by any
computer literate ham. InDesign is MS-Word on steroids.

AMSAT’s Web Presence
——————–
Help is needed on the front to locate and publish up to date content
for the AMSAT web. We publish late breaking news of amateur radio in
space. We also publish reference information to help operate on the
satellites …
software, radios, antennas, operating techniques. Web content
containing late-breaking operating news and reliable operator tips
currently has several gaps needing to be filled. Our WordPress
environment makes the web display easy but you’ll be spending your
volunteer time on the content. This is a job for 5 or more volunteers
and needs to be filled immediately!

AMSAT also is looking for a webmaster who will assume responsibility
for the display of all content in a WordPress environment. The basic
framework is in place but can definitely stand to be fine tuned and
made into a world class display of amateur radio in space. For most
hams on-line www.amsat.org is our “front door” and we are looking for
the most capable help on this important user interface!

Our team is the “voice of AMSAT”. News, operator tips, and
membership benefits are important products for AMSAT User Services.
For questions or to volunteer please contact AMSAT’s Vice President
of User Services, JoAnne Maenpaa, K9JKM at k9jkm@amsat.org

[ANS thanks AMSAT Vice President of User Services, JoAnne Maenpaa,
K9JKM for the above information]

———————————————————————

73 on 73 Award #4 – EA5TT

Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, who is sponsoring the award for contacts made
via the AO-73 (FUNcube-1) amateur radio satellite, recently
recognized Manuel D. Ruiz Carrasco, EA5TT, for becoming the fourth
recipient of the 73 on 73 Award. He submitted a list of 73 stations
worked via AO-73 between September 1, 2014 and December 8, 2014.

The award aims to promote activity on AO-73. The requirements are
straight-forward:

1. Work 73 unique stations on AO-73.
2. Contacts must be made on or after September 1, 2014.
3. There are no geographic restrictions on your operating location.

There will be no cost for this award (donations to AMSAT-UK and
AMSAT-NA’s Fox program are encouraged though).

No QSL cards are required. When you complete the requirements, email
your log extract including the callsign of each station worked, time
GMT, and date to n8hm@arrl.net as well as the address where you’d
like the award certificate sent.

Congratulations Manuel!

[ANS thanks Paul N8HM for the above information]]

———————————————————————

Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF, Reflects on Her First ARISS Contact

In her blog shared 16 Dec 2014, Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF,
reflects on her first ever ARISS school contact with twenty students
from Elena di Savoia in Bari and “Alessandro Volta” in Bitonto. In
her comments she thanks the “army of volunteers in many countires”
who make the contacts possible and how impressed she was with the
quality of all the questions that “showed a great interest and
knowledge in science and technology…”

“Yesterday I had my first HAM radio contact with school pupils. A
big hello to the students of the schools ‘Elena di Savoia’ in Bari
and ‘Alessandro Volta’ in Bitonto!  It was fun talking to you and
thanks for the great questions!

Amateur radio contacts between astronauts and school kids have a
long tradition on ISS, thanks to a little army of volunteers in many
countries who work with the local schools not only on the day of
contact, but also in the weeks and months leading up to the event:
they teach students about radio technology and about space, to get
them ready and hopefully excited about the event.

From my side, I only needed to be ready on the proper channel at the
proper time: it is very important, because we need direct line-of-
sight with the amateur radio station on the ground and the pass is
only about ten minutes long. A couple of minutes before the expected
acquisition-of-signal time, I started making calls to check if
someone was already picking me up. Eventually I picked up a call from
the ground station and sure enough, we started our conversation. I
heard them loud and clear, which positively surprised me: somehow I
expected signal quality not to be as good. I hope they had the same
quality on the other side.

On such contacts, there’s no time for small talk and formalities: in
less than ten minutes, we had to make sure that the 20 students who
were lined up to ask their question got their chance. So here I was,
ready to go. And here came the first question – are you ready? Here’s
it is:

‘It is known that people become taller when they are in space. What
happens to bio-molecules? Is there any alteration in the tertiary
structure of proteins?’

I almost fell off my chair… well, if I had had a chair. (Wonder what
a good equivalent of this expression would be in weightlessness… any
suggestions?)

Where are the good old question about space food and the space
toilet? Jokes apart, I was really impressed with all the questions:
they showed a great interest and knowledge in science and technology
and gave me great hope for our future generations of scientists and
engineers. Keep up the great work, girls and boys!”

Cristoforetti’s adventures in space can be followed at
https://plus.google.com/+SamanthaCristoforetti/posts

[ANS thanks Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between ELENA DI SAVOIA, BARI AND
ALESSANDRO VOLTA, BITONTO, Italy and Astronaut Samantha
Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF using callsign IR0ISS. The contact began
Monday 15 December 2014 at 1518 UTC and lasted about nine and a half
minutes. Contact was direct via IZ7EVR.
ARISS Mentor was IKØWGF.

The  Alessandro Volta school teaches communications, social-history,
mathematics, science and technology in different contexts: life,
study, job. In addition it fosters useful competence, allowing
students to access  continuous innovations through 3 specializations:
Mechanics and Mechatronics, IT and Telecommunications, Electronics
and Electro-technics.

ARISS mentor Francesco De Paolis, IK0WGF proposed to Radio Contact
Coordinator Mr. Michele Mallardi IZ7EVR to set up a direct contact,
with the support by IK1SLD back-up ground station, and this was
accepted. The event took place in Elena di Savoia school, where an
audience of more than 200 students, visitors (including some Italian
Air Force officers) and Media (2 TV, 2 newspapers) participated at
contact site, and about 200 at both schools. Total of more than 400
people.

Before the contact, Mrs. Rosa Tagliamonte by ASI (Italian Space
Agency) presented the Cristoforetti mission and the Italian
contribution to the International Space Station. Mr. Michele Mallardi
IZ7EVR presented ARISS and explained how a contact with the ISS is
performed via Ham Radio.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Yekaterinburg, Russia, direct via TBD
Contact is presently  scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is a go for Sun 2014-12-21 11:55 UTC  (primary) or Sun 2014-
12-21 13:00 UTC (backup)

Kursk, Russia,  direct via TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is  a go for Thu 2014-12-24 TBD UTC

Kursk, Russia, direct via  TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is a go for  Fri 2014-12-25 TBD  UTC

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Revised Tracking Utilites for DESAPTCH and Shin-en2

The spacecrafts, DESAPTCH and Shin-en2 are still alive.

Masahiro Sanada JI1IZR has recently revised the predict tracking
utilites for the extension of the data range.

The new versions can be obtained from:
http://ji1izr.air-nifty.com/ham_satellite/2014/12/artsat2-desp-11.html

[ANS thanks Masahiro,JI1IZR for the above information]

+ Radio ham helps ESA with tracking widget

Thanks to radio amateur Chip Sufitchi N2YO the European Space
Agency’s new satellite tracking widgets are live

The tracking widgets are fed with the latest orbital tracks for ESA
missions, or missions with significant ESA participation. The
default track shows the ISS.

Track ESA missions
http://blogs.esa.int/rocketscience/track-esa-missions/

ESA tracking widgets are powered by
http://www.n2yo.com/
[ANS thanks Southgate ARN for the above information]

+ In Liue of the recent SSTV transmissions from the International
Space Station, everyone is reminded that information is available by
visiting the ARISS SSTV Blogspot.
http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Also, the full set of archived SSTV images are located at:
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Those that receive images can upload to the above link. The best of
the best uploads may make it to the blog.

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org
_______________________________________________
Sent via AMSAT-BB@amsat.org. AMSAT-NA makes this open forum available
to all interested persons worldwide without requiring membership. Opinions expressed
are solely those of the author, and do not reflect the official views of AMSAT-NA.
Not an AMSAT-NA member? Join now to support the amateur satellite program!
Subscription settings: http://amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb
AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-348

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* SSTV transmissions from the International Space Station
* Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule
* OSCAR Number for DESPATCH
* UWE-3 CubeSat Update
* Send your code into space with astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-348.01
ANS-348 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 348.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
December 14, 2014
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-348.01

SSTV transmissions from the International Space Station

The Russian ARISS team members plan to activate SSTV from the ISS on
Thursday December 18 and Saturday December 20, 2014.

Expected SSTV mode will be PD180 on 145.800 MHz with 3 minute off
periods between transmissions. A total of 12 different photos will be
sent during the operational period.

Start time would be around 14:20 UTC on December 18 and 12:40 UTC on
December 20. The transmissions should terminate around 21:30 UTC each
day.

For ongoing information visit the ARISS SSTV Blogspot
http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Also, the full set of archived SSTV images are located at:
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Those that receive images can upload to the above link. The best of
the best uploads may make it to the blog.

SpaceX CRS-55 will be launching this week and delays in the launch could
adjust SSTV operational times.

[ANS Thanks Gaston ON4WF, ARISS-Europe chairman, for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Istituto Tecnico Statale Economico e Tecnologico “Elena di Savoia” — ”
Piero Calamandrei”, Bari, Italy, direct via IZ7EVR and State Technical
Institute of Technology Alessandro Volta, Bitonto, Italy, direct via IZ7EVR
Contact is presently scheduled to be with IRØISS
Contact is a go for: Mon 2014-12-15 15:18:40 UTC 44 deg

Yekaterinburg, Russia, direct via TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is a go for Sun 2014-12-21 11:55 UTC (primary) or Sun 2014-12-21
13:00 UTC (backup)

Kursk, Russia, direct via TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is a go for Thu 2014-12-24 TBD UTC

Kursk, Russia, direct via TBD
Contact is presently scheduled to be with RSØISS
Contact is a go for Fri 2014-12-25 TBD UTC

ARISS is always glad to receive listener reports for the above contacts.
ARISS thanks everyone in advance for their assistance. Feel free to send
your reports to aj9n at amsat.org or aj9n at aol.com.

For US schools, just a reminder that proposals for hosting an ARISS
contact are due December 15, 2014.

[ANS thanks Charlie, AJ9N, for the above information]

———————————————————————

OSCAR Number for DESPATCH

Prof. Akihiro Kubota of the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan has informed
AMSAT-NA of the successful launch on December 3 of deep space probe DESPATCH.

One important mission for DESPATCH is an experiment in what is called
“cooperative diversity communication.” In this experiment, an attempt will be
made to collect signals from the spacecraft received not only at the ground
station in Tokyo, but also at many ham radio stations around the world. This is
in order to reconstruct the original data from the spacecraft.

Reception of such weak signals to reconstruct data from the spacecraft will
require the expertise of exceptionally skilled ham operators. The builders are
thereby providing a rare opportunity to receive radio signals transmitted by a
spacecraft in deep space, and ask for cooperation radio amateurs around the
world in the project.

Initially, it was expected that the spacecraft would last only a few days but
now it appears that this assessment was pessimistic with a longer life now
expected..

Since DESPATCH appears to have met all of the requirements for an OSCAR number,
including IARU coordination, I hereby with the authority vested in me be the
AMSAT-NA President, do confer on DESPATCH, the OSCAR number Fuji OSCAR 81 or
FO-81.

I use the Fuji designation in recognition of the long history of contributions
the Japanese have made to Amateur Radio satellites.

I trust that Fuji OSCAR-81’s mission will be successful and much valuable date
collected.

73,
William (Bill) Tynan, W3XO
OSCAR Number Administrator

Further information about the Cooperative Data Reconstruction project can be
found at the link below.

http://despatch.artsat.jp/en/Cooperative_Data_Reconstruction

[ANS thanks Bill, W3XO, for the above information]

———————————————————————

UWE-3 CubeSat Update

UWE-3 was launched with FUNcube-1 on November 21, 2013, the team says they will
now be temporarily ending operations.

Today, more than one year after launch, there will be a temporary end of
operations caused by the end of funding.

However, UWE-3 is in a very good health condition with fully charged batteries
and operations may be continued depending on future research plans.

Without any reception from ground, UWE-3 will carry out a warm reset every four
days and switch regularly between the redundant on-board processors and radios.
Therefore, UWE-3 will switch back to its nominal frequency of 437.385 MHz.

Nevertheless we appreciate the extensive support we received from the HAM
amateurs in the past and hope that also in the future the status of UWE-3 will
be monitored with your support, like you did so many times in the past year.
Thank you so much for the very helpful cooperation in this respect!

UEW-3 News
http://www7.informatik.uni-
wuerzburg.de/forschung/space_exploration/projects/uwe_3/uwe_3_news/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Send your code into space with astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI

Leading UK space organisations have joined forces with UK Astronaut Tim Peake
KG5BVI and Raspberry Pi to offer students a chance to devise and code their own
apps or experiment to run in space. Two Raspberry Pi computers are planned to be
flown to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of Tim’s 6 month mission
and both will be connected to a new “Astro Pi” board, loaded with a host of
sensors and gadgets.

Launched December 10 at an event held by the UK Space Agency, the Astro Pi
competition will be officially opened at the BETT conference (January 21-24) and
will be open to all primary and secondary school aged children who are resident
in the United Kingdom. The competition will be supported by a comprehensive
suite of teaching resources that are being developed by ESERO-UK and Raspberry
Pi.

During his mission to the ISS, Tim Peake KG5BVI plans to deploy the Astro Pi
computers in a number of different locations on board the ISS. He will then load
up the winning code whilst in orbit, set them running, collect the data
generated and then download this to Earth where it will be distributed to the
winning teams.

Speaking at the Astro Pi launch event, Dr David Parker, Chief Executive of the
UK Space Agency, also revealed that the UK Space Agency has been given a £2
million programme, as part of the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement, to support
further outreach activities around Tim’s mission, particularly to help inspire
interest in STEM subjects.

Tim Peake KG5BVI said I’m really excited about this project, born out of the
cooperation among UK industries and institutions. There is huge scope for fun
science and useful data gathering using the Astro Pi sensors on board the
International Space Station. This competition offers a unique chance for young
people to learn core computing skills that will be extremely useful in their
future. It’s going to be a lot of fun!

To help students on their way in developing their code, five inspirational
themes have been devised to stimulate creativity and scientific thinking. The
themes are Spacecraft Sensors, Satellite Imaging, Space Measurements, Data
Fusion and Space Radiation.

In the primary school age category, teams will be asked to devise and describe
an original idea for an experiment or application which can be conducted on the
Astro Pi by Tim during his mission. The two best submissions will get the
opportunity to work with the Astro Pi team to interpret their ideas and the team
at the Raspberry Pi Foundation will then code them ready for flight on the ISS.

In the secondary school age group, the competition will be run across three age
categories, one for each of Key Stages 3, 4 and 5 (in England and Wales, and
their equivalent ages in Scotland and Northern Ireland). In the first phase,
competitors can submit their ideas for experiments and applications. At least
the best 50 submissions in each age category will win a Raspberry Pi computer
and an Astro Pi board on which to code their idea. In phase 2, all teams will
develop code based on their original concept and two winning teams will be
selected in each age category. The winning teams’ code will be readied for
flight by the Raspberry Pi Foundation and CGI.

As well as having their code uploaded to the ISS, all winning teams will each
receive a class set of Raspberry Pi and Astro Pi boards, meet the Astro Pi team
and participate in a winners event during Tim’s flight.

In addition to the main prizes, each of the UK space companies supporting the
project have offered a prize. These prizes will be awarded to the best
submission associated with each of the themes, across the age ranges.

ESERO-UK and Raspberry Pi are developing a comprehensive suite of teaching
resources to link to the curriculum and assist teachers of STEM subjects in
engaging their students in the competition. As well as explaining how to use and
write code for the Astro Pi and its sensors, the resources will provide a
context for the Astro Pi in the curriculum and link to teaching subjects and
areas.

The first two resources of the series are available now in the National STEM
Centre eLibrary and the rest will follow.

Launching the Astro Pi computers, and consequently the successful implementation
and completion of this competition is subject to nominal progress through the
ESA integration programme and operations on-board the ISS.

BBC TV News: Astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI invites Raspberry Pi challenge
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-30415207

Astro Pi: Your code in space http://astro-pi.org/

[ANS thanks the UK Space Agency for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

 

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-341

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT Board Approves Technology Development Seed Funding
* November/December AMSAT Journal is Ready
* AMSAT SKN ON OSCAR 2015
* ARISS Discusses Ham TV, Elects New International Officers
* Amateur radio spacecraft received over 1 million km from Earth
* Japanese Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads are Launched
into Deep Space
* HAMSAT II – Dhruva Space and AMSAT India
* SpinSat Now in Orbit
* Surrey Space Centre SME-SAT
* AMSAT Events
* Call for Proposals ARISS Contact Opportunity
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-341.01
ANS-341 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 341.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE December 7, 2014
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-341.01
———————————————————————
AMSAT Board Approves Technology Development Seed Funding
The AMSAT Board of Directors met on December 2, 2014. As a part of
AMSAT’s “Design The Next AMSAT Satellite” challenge, the Board of
Directors approved $5000, within the 2015 engineering budget, to be
used as seed money for future satellite development. Additional fund
raising sources will also be investigated and pursued.

AMSAT President Barry Baines, WD4ASW, said, “We’re prepared to
return to space starting in 2015 with a fleet of satellites that will
equal, if not exceed, the performance, and availability to the
average ham, of our previously popular AMSAT OSCAR 51. Meanwhile, we
are preparing for the future looking to potentially leverage new
technologies, to provide the best opportunities for enhancing amateur
radio’s presence in space.”

Director Tom Clark, K3IO, noted the need for a defined future systems
program. Tom said, “We saw a significant number of both new and old
members who want to see the development of critical system elements
for future opportunities by 2018-20. As I see it, critical ‘tall
poles’ in applying potential technologies require significant work to
begin now to ensure success.”

AMSAT is interested in supporting technology ideas that enhance the
utility of using the CubeSat form factor to support more robust
amateur satellite capabilities. The scope of potential interest in
not limited; some examples of technology enhancement might include:

+ Microwave technology suitable for use in amateur spacecraft. This
includes the need to identify optimum frequency bands.

+ Complementary, low-cost ground systems, including an effective ~1º
antenna pointing system.

+ Define and develop optimum coding and modulation schemes for low
power microwave use.

+ Attitude determination & control systems to point the spacecraft
antennas towards the user while maximizing solar panel production.

Individuals interested in learning more about this initiative should
contact AMSAT Vice President-Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY (n0jy at
amsat.org).

Meanwhile, the development of AMSAT’s current series of the Fox-1
cubesats continues on schedule. AMSAT Vice-President of Engineering,
Jerry Buxton, N0JY reported during the Board meeting that
construction and testing of five Fox satellites is on schedule:

+ Fox-1A will launch on a NASA ELaNa flight during the 3rd quarter
of 2015 from Vandenberg AFB,

+ Fox-1B will fly with the Vanderbilt University radiation
experiments expected in 2016.

+ Fox-1C will launch on Spaceflight’s maiden mission of the
SHERPA multi-cubesat deployer during the 3rd quarter of 2015.
This flight was purchased by AMSAT.

+ Fox-1D is a flight spare for Fox-1C. If not needed as a spare
it will become available to launch on any open launch slot which
becomes available and be submitted in a CSLI proposal in 2015.

+ Fox-1E is built as a flight spare for Fox-1B but has been
included in a student science proposal as part of the November,
2014 Cubesat Launch Initiative (CSLI) for an ELaNa flight slot.
If selected the Fox-1B spare will fly as Fox-1E.

More details of the “Design The Next AMSAT Satellite” challenge can
be found on-line at:
http://www.amsat.org/?p=3395
– and – in the November/December 2014 AMSAT Journal, currently in-
transit to your QTH.
[ANS thanks the AMSAT Board Of Directors for the above information]
———————————————————————
November/December AMSAT Journal is Ready
The November/December 2014 AMSAT Journal is completed and has been
sent to the print shop.

The contents of this issue include:

+ AMSAT Announcements
+ Apogee View
+ November 15 – 40th Anniversary of AO-7 Launch
+ A Checklist to Design The Next AMSAT Satellite!
Jerry Buxton, N0JY
+ AMSAT Engineering Update
Jerry Buxton, N0JY
+ Satrack – Doppler and AZ/EL Control Software
Pedro Converso, LU7ABF
+ Operating FO-29 from CN73
Lee (Doc) Ernstrom, WA7HQD
+ Taking Part in the ARISS Project on a $500 Budget
Dr. Michael Butler, MA, MSc, PhD, G4OCR
+ How to Get Your AMSAT Challenge Coin
+ AMSAT Field Operations Report
Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK
+ ARISS 2014: A Program in Transition
Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, et al
+ An Eyeball QSO in India
Burns Fisher W2BFJ

Thanks to all who contributed!
[ANS thanks the AMSAT Journal for the above information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT SKN ON OSCAR 2015
You are cordially invited to participate in Straight Key Night on
OSCAR 2015, sponsored by AMSAT for radio amateurs throughout the
world.

This year’s event is being held in memory of Captain Charles Dorian,
W3JPT, who passed away in 2014, aged 92. Chuck, who had held many
senior positions in the U.S. Coast Guard, was one of AMSAT’s earliest
members and served as secretary of the Board of Directors.

Participation in AMSAT SKN on OSCAR is easy and fun. Just operate
CW, using a straight key or non-electronic “bug,” through any
amateur satellite between 0000 and 2400 UTC on January 1, 2015.
There is no need to send in a log, but all participants are asked to
nominate someone they worked for “Best Fist.” Your nominee need not
have the best fist of those you heard, only of those you worked.
Send your nomination to w2rs@amsat.org. A list of “Best Fist”
nominees will be published in early February.
[ANS thanks Ray, W2RS for the above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS Discusses Ham TV, Elects New International Officers
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is
continuing explore the possibility of establishing a network of
ground stations to enable the use of the Ham TV video system during
ARISS school contacts. Mark Steiner, K3MS, updated the ARISS
International team on the topic during its November meeting,
conducted by teleconference. Kerry Banke, N6IZW, who works on ARISS
hardware issues, reported that a document under development will
describe just what is required to build a ground station. He and
ARISS International Project Selection & Use Committee representative
Lou McFadin, W5DID, have successfully received Ham TV transmissions.

ARISS-EU President Gaston Bertels, ON4WF, has been working with
European Space Agency (ESA) management to finalize the agreement that
transfers custody of the Ham Video transmitter from ESA to ARISS.
Steiner told the teleconference that more “blank” test transmissions
could take place, once the custodial agreement is finalized.

NASA Astronaut Mike Hopkins, KF5LJG, successfully installed and
commissioned the ARISS) Ham Video system last March. The system can
transmit video of the crew and the interior of the Columbus module on
the 2.4 GHz band (S-band). Last April, Japanese Astronaut Koichi
Wakata, KC5ZTA, served as the host for a successful final
commissioning pass for the Ham Video transmitter and camera. The
ARISS project, led initially by ARISS-EU, AMSAT-Italy, and ESA, would
enhance ARISS school contacts by providing a video and audio
downlink, plus an audio-only uplink.

Operating under the call sign OR4ISS, the S-band transmitter can be
connected to one of two ARISS patch antennas on Columbus. Radiated RF
power is on the order of 10 W EIRP. The commissioning process
primarily involved making sure that ground stations in Europe would
be able to copy the DTV downlink signal. Commissioning of the overall
“Ham TV” system culminated more than a decade of planning and
preparation.

During the November 18 teleconference ARISS International delegates
re-elected the current slate of officers for new 2-year terms
starting on January 1, 2015. The incumbents are ARISS Chair Frank
Bauer, KA3HDO; ARISS Vice-Chair Oliver Amend, DG6BCE, and ARISS
Secretary-Treasurer Rosalie White, K1STO. In keeping with tradition,
Canada’s ARISS delegate Ian MacFarquhar, VE9IM, handled the election
logistics.
[ANS thanks ARISS, ARRL, & AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
Amateur radio spacecraft received over 1 million km from Earth
Michal Zawada SQ5KTM received signals from the ARTSAT2:DESPATCH and
Shin’en2 spacecraft on Friday evening, December 5 at a distance of
around 1,100,000 km from Earth.

Ham radio spacecraft launched into deep space
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/12/03/ham-radio-spacecraft-launched-into-
deep-space/
[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
Japanese Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads are Launched into
Deep Space
This week, Japan successfully launched its Hayabusa 2 asteroid
sample-return mission into deep space, and with it, two satellites
carrying Amateur Radio payloads. A Japan Aerospace Exploration
Agency (JAXA) rocket lifted off on schedule early on December 3
(UTC), carrying the Hayabusa 2 spacecraft on the first leg of its
journey to Asteroid 1999 JU3. Along for the ride into deep space are
two Amateur Radio satellites, Shin’en 2 (Abyss 2) and ARTSAT2:
DESPATCH. The launch had been postponed twice owing to unfavorable
weather conditions. Shin’en 2 will identify as JG6YIG, while
ARTSAT2:DESPATCH will use the call sign JQ1ZNN.

Shin’en2 carries a 0.1 W CW beacon on 437.505 MHz and telemetry on
437.385 MHz (0.8 W) using a mode similar to WSJT. It will also carry
a F1D digital store-and-forward transponder with an uplink of 145.942
MHz and a downlink at 435.270 MHz (0.4 W), but not the Amateur Radio
Mode J linear transponder announced earlier. The data format is
posted on the Kagoshima University website.

A linear SSB/CW transponder had been part of the initial design,
but, according to Hideo Kambayashi, JH3XCU, that had to be abandoned
because of regulatory issues. The digital transponder will offer
earthbound hams an opportunity to test the limits of their
communication capabilities, however. The project also is hoping to
gather listener reports.

ARTSAT2:DESPATCH carries a 7 W CW transmitter on 437.325 MHz.
Onboard will be the first sculpture ever to be carried into deep
space. The ARTSAT2: DESPATCH mission is seeking “exceptionally
skilled ham operators” as part of its “cooperative diversity
communication” experiment. This effort will attempt to intercept
signals from the spacecraft not only at the ground station in Tokyo,
but at Amateur Radio stations around the world, “in order to
reconstruct the original data from the spacecraft.”

“Reception of such weak signals to reconstruct data from the
spacecraft will require the expertise of exceptionally skilled ham
operators,” the satellite’s developers explained.

The two spacecraft will have an elliptical orbit around the Sun and
travel to a deep space orbit between Venus and Mars. With an orbital
inclination of nearly zero, the spacecraft should stay in Earth’s
equatorial plane. The distance from the Sun will be between
approximately 6.5 million and 12 million miles.
[ANS thanks ARRL and AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
HAMSAT II – Dhruva Space and AMSAT India
The Economic Times report Dhruva Space, a two-year-old start-up co-
founded by space technologist and ham radio operator Sanjay Nekkanti
VU3ISS/AB3OE, sealed a deal with AMSAT India on November 30, 2014 to
develop HAMSAT II. VUsat-OSCAR-52_HAMSAT

It will be the successor to HAMSAT VO-52 which went silent on July
11, 2014 due to the failure of the on-board lithium ion batteries.
HAMSAT provided a valuable communications resource for the amateur
radio community for over 9 years.

Dhruva’s satellites are expected to be launched on ISRO’s workhorse
Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV). Nekkanti said his team is
working closely with the space organization for design approvals and
testing of the satellite.

The AMSAT India Secretary Nitin Muttin, VU3TYG has released this
statement:

We are pleased to announce that AMSAT India and Dhruva Space Pvt.
Ltd. have signed a Memorandum of Understanding on November 30th 2014
to pursue the development of a follow up mission to HAMSAT launched
in 2005 on-board the PSLV-C6. HAMSAT II is envisioned to fill the gap
created by the recent end of life of HAMSAT and shall continue
servicing the societal needs in disaster management,
amateur/emergency radio communications and education.

Some of the contemplated payloads for HAMSAT II include:
* U/V Analog FM Transponder
* U/V Linear Transponder, 50 kHz
* APRS Digipeater
* Digitalker

Read The Economic Times article at
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/45354501.cms

AMSAT India
http://amsatindia.org/
[ANS thanks Dinesh, AB3DC and AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
SpinSat Now in Orbit
The US Naval Research Laboratory SpinSat satellite was successfully
deployed from the International Space Station on November 28. SpinSat
arrived at the ISS on September 21 via the SpaceX Falcon 9 resupply
vehicle. For the next few days, SpinSat’s orbit will approximate that
of the ISS. The ISS real-time tracker on the ISS Fan Club website can
show when the spacecraft are within range.

The 125-pound SpinSat, a 22- inch diameter sphere, carries a 2 W
9600 bps AX.25 packet radio store-and-forward system on 437.230 MHz.
The satellite’s primary mission is to demonstrate a new micro-
thruster technology, from which SpinSat derives its name; its 12
electronically controlled solid-propellant thrusters will be fired in
pairs to spin the spacecraft.

Equipped only with primary batteries and just 4.8 grams of fuel, the
satellite’s working phase is expected to last up to 6 months
[ANS thanks ARRL and AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
Surrey Space Centre SME-SAT
The Surrey Space Centre (SSC) are developing a 3U CubeSat SME-SAT
expected to launch into a 550-620 km orbit using the ISIPOD CubeSat
deployer.

The mission objectives are:
A: Outreach – The satellite will provide beacons for which amateur
satellite users and ham radio users will be able to receive.
B: Space qualification and performance characterisation of sensors.
* High performance COTS Gyroscopes (x3).
* High precision MEMS accelerometers.
* Aperture Star Camera, At a later point in the mission these will
be used in conjunction with the ADCS to characterise the closed loop
performance of the sensors.
C: Performance characterisation of Nano-Control Moment Gyros (CMGs)
for agility. The mission is equipped with 4-Nano-CMGs in a pyramid
configuration for ADCS. This part of the mission will evaluate the
performance of this system on the ADCS and agility of the satellite.
D: Space qualification and performance characterisation of the EPS
The EPS for this mission has heritage from the Delfi-C3 and other
missions and includes additional improvements to be demonstrated on
this mission.
E: Smart Thermal Radiation Devices (STRD tiles) SME-SAT is equipped
with a number of STRD tiles on the outside faces of the satellite for
passive thermal management of the internal structure.
F: Flux Gate Magnetometer The mission contains a scientific grade
miniaturized flux gate magnetometer that sits on the end of a
deployable boom to improve the performance of the sensor. This
payload will be switched into the ADCS for evaluation of performance
during parts of the mission but is not the primary magnetometer for
ADCS.
G: GPS SME-SAT also contains an experimental GPS system that will be
switched into the ADCS loop at stages in the orbit to evaluate the
performance of the system.

Planning a 9k6 RC-BPSK UHF downlink using AX25.

Further information at
http://www.surrey.ac.uk/ssc/research/space_vehicle_control/smesat/
index.htm

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination
http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru
[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]
———————————————————————
AMSAT Events
Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

* Friday and Saturday, 11-12 December 2014 – Tampa Bay Hamfest in
Plant City FL (Agricultural Show Center)

* Sunday, 4 January 2015 – Ham Radio University in Bethpage NY
(Briarcliffe College)

* Saturday, 10 January 2015 – Thunderbird Hamfest 2015 in Phoenix AZ
(43rd Avenue, between Greenway and Bell Roads)

* Saturday, 14 February 2015 – Greater Los Angeles Mensa Regional
Gathering 2015 in Los Angeles CA (Concourse Hotel at Los Angeles
International Airport) – satellite- and AMSAT-related presentation

* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 February 2015 – Yuma Hamfest in Yuma AZ
(Yuma County Fairgrounds, 32nd Street between Pacific Avenue & Avenue
3E, south of I-8 exit 3)

* Saturday TBD in mid-March 2015 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club
Hamfest in Scottsdale AZ

* Saturday, 28 March 2015 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ (22nd
Street, east of Columbus Blvd.)

* Saturday TBD in early May 2015 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association
Hamfest in Sierra Vista AZ

* Saturday TBD in early June 2015 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show
Low AZ
[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]
———————————————————————
Call for Proposals ARISS Contact Opportunity
Proposal Window October 17 to December 15, 2014.

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program
is seeking formal and informal education institutions and
organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates
that the contact would be held between May 1, 2015 and December 31,
2015. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact contact
dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS is
looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of
participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
education plan.
The deadline to submit a proposal is December 15, 2014. Proposal
information and documents can be found at
www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.
The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate
in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are
approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students and educators
to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via
Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space
station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford
education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from
astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn
about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an
opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless
technology, and radio science. Because of the nature of human
spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the
ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate
changes in contact dates and times.
Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space
agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this educational
opportunity by providing the equipment and operational support to
enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and students
around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program is managed
by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and ARRL (American
Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA.
More Information

Interested parties can find more information about the program at
www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS.
For proposal information and more details such as expectations,
proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of
Information Sessions go to
http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please direct any questions to ariss@arrl.org.
[ANS thanks ARISS, AMSAT-Edu, and the ARRL for the above information]
———————————————————————
ARISS News
Upcoming Contacts

* From 2014-11-10 to 2014-12-07, there will be no US Operational
Segment (USOS) hams on board ISS. So any schools contacts during
this period will be conducted by the ARISS Russia team.
[ANS thanks ARISS, Gaston, ON4WF and Charlie, AJ9N for the above
information]
———————————————————————
Satellite Shorts From All Over
COSMOS-2491 RS-46

Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB reports that the COSMOS-2491 satellite carries
RS-46 operating on 435.465 MHz and 435.565 MHz (+/- Doppler).

The satellite was launched on December 25, 2013 and is in a 1,515.8
km by 1,489.1 km 82.5 degree inclination orbit.

Track COSMOS-2491 / RS-46 at
http://www.n2yo.com/satellite/?s=39497

Listen for RS-46 online with the SUWS WebSDR located near London
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/08/15/suws-websdr-moves-to-new-site/
COSMOS-2499 Callsign RS-47!

COSMOS-2499 (2014-028E) was launched on May 23, 2014 and is now in a
1,510.6 km by 1,158.8 km 82.4 degree orbit. Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB has
received signals from the satellite on approximately 435.465 MHz and
435.565 MHz (+/- Doppler). On November 30 the satellite started
identifying itself in Morse code on 435.465 MHz as RS-47.

There has been some mystery concerning the purpose of COSMOS-2499.
In a post updated November 20, 2014 Anatoly Zak @RussianSpaceWeb
wrote: Ground observations indicated that the mystery satellite had
not exceeded 0.3 meters in size. Previously, two Rockot launches
with trios of Rodnik/Strela-3M launches also carried Yubileiny
(a.k.a. MiR) experimental satellites with a reported mass from 48 to
100 kilograms. As with the previous launch, observers were at a
complete loss about the possible purpose of the satellite.

Cosmos-2499 has made a number or orbital changes since it was first
launched. For further information see
http://www.russianspaceweb.com/Cosmos-2499.html

Track COSMOS-2499 / RS-47 at
http://www.n2yo.com/?s=39765

Listen for RS-47 online with the SUWS WebSDR located near London
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/08/15/suws-websdr-moves-to-new-site/

RS-47 Telemetry data
http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?p=52752

Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB describes receiving the 435.465 MHz and 435.565
MHz signals at
http://tinyurl.com/R4UAB-COSMOS-2499

[ANS thanks Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB and AMSAT-UK for the above
information]
Job Opportunity: Quantum CubeSat Electronics and Software Engineer

The Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) at the National University
of Singapore (NUS) is looking for a talented and motivated engineer
with electronics and software expertise to join a young and dynamic
team developing science-grade cubesats to host state-of-the-art,
quantum communications experiments.
The successful candidate will be responsible for the electronics and
software of the satellite platform and will be engaged in the
complete cycle of satellite development from PDR, to operation of
satellites in space. They will work with the team to:

Specify and integrate spacecraft subsystems from our contracted
cubesat company.
Develop software to run the experiments and downlink the data
via an s-band network.
Perform extremely rigorous on-the-ground testing and
verification of the satellite and its payload.
Assist with electronics and software related issues with the
satellite and the payload as they arise.

They will need to be comfortable in a small-team academic
environment, flexible to changing priorities and requirements, and
they will need to develop a good understanding and appreciation of
the science payload and its working so as to best fulfill their
duties.

A proven track-record in developing successful, optimized,
electronics and software for control of experiments and
instrumentation in space or similar harsh environments is required.
Previous experience with the space industry, space hardware and/or
cubesats is very desirable but all cubesat-specific technical
training can be provided on-the-job by an internationally successful
cubesat company.

For an overview article on the project see:
http://www.quantumlah.org/media/story/2012_OPN_Alexfeature.pdf

Both Singaporeans and international applicants are encouraged to
apply. NUS is a globally ranked university and Singapore is a clean,
vibrant, multicultural English-speaking country with very high
standards of living. Salary is based on experience and skills but
will be internationally competitive.

Interested candidates should send a CV and cover letter to
cqtrb@nus.edu.sg and
cqtalej@nus.edu.sg

[ANS thanks CubeSat.org mailing list for the above information]
———————————————————————
/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

 

MHz while you’re away at work

http://antoninoporcino.xoom.it/VoxRecorder/

ARISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) Blog and Gallery
http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.co.uk/

Information on the MAI-75 SSTV experiment
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/education-26.html

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Send your message “from the Moon”

The LuxSpace 4M amateur radio payload is expected to fly around the
Moon at the end of October and you can upload a message to the 4M
website that will be transmitted on 145.980 MHz using JT65B during
the flight.

There is room for 2500 messages each up to 13 characters long. Your
message could be your name/callsign or “73 de M5AKA”.

During the lunar flyby, the spacecraft will be about 399,636 km from
Earth. The LuxSpace team wish to encourage radio amateurs around the
world to receive the transmissions and send in data. There will be a
number of Experiments and Contests with prizes to the winners in each
experiment and category. Details are given on page 19 of 4M Mission:
a Lunar FlyBy experiment.

4M stands for Manfred Memorial Moon Mission in memory of Professor
Manfred Fuchs, founder and chairman of OHB group, Bremen, who passed
away on April 27, 2014.

Register and Upload your message at
http://moon.luxspace.lu/messages/

4M Mission: a Lunar FlyBy experiment
https://ukamsat.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/lxs-4m-eme2014-a4-v3.pdf

Further information on this project is at
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/09/01/4m-lunar-payload/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Contract to Build Es’hailSat Includes AMSAT-DL Phase 4 Transponders

Gunter Krebs reports on his Space Pages on the web that Es’hailSat has
signed a contract with MELCO to build the Es’hail-2 geostationary
comsat.

Es’hail 2 is a planned communication satellite operated by
Es’hailSat, the Qatar Satellite Company. It will also feature an
radio amateur payload.

The new satellite will be positioned at the 26° East hotspot
position for TV broadcasting and significantly adds to the company’s
ability to provide high quality, premium DTH television content
across the Middle East and North Africa. It will feature Ku-band and
Ka-band transponders to provide TV distribution and government
services to strategic stakeholders and commercial customers who
value broadcasting and communications independence, interference
resilience, quality of service and wide geographical coverage.
Es’hail 2 is expected to be launched at the end of 2016.

In September 2014, a contract with MELCO was signed to build the
satellite based on the DS-2000 bus.

Es’hail 2 will also provide the first Amateur Radio geostationary
communication capability linking Brazil and India. It will carry two
“Phase 4″ Amateur Radio transponders. The payload will consist of a
250 kHz linear transponder intended for conventional analogue
operations in addition to another transponder which will have an
8 MHz bandwidth. The latter transponder is intended for experimental
digital modulation schemes and DVB amateur television. The uplinks
will be in the 2.400-2.450 GHz and the downlinks in the
10.450-10.500 GHz amateur satellite service allocations.
Both transponders will have broad beam antennas to provide full
coverage over about third of the earth’s surface. The Qatar Amateur
Radio Society andQatar Satellite Company are cooperating on the
amateur radio project.
AMSAT-DL is providing technical support to the project.

This story is posted at:
http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/eshail-2.htm

[ANS thanks Gunter’s Space Pages for the above information]

———————————————————————

Chicago Media Coverage St. Joan of Arc School ARISS Contact

Here is a link to local Chicagoland coverage of the St. Joan of Arc
ARISS contact:

http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2014/09/08/students-at-lisle-school-chat-
with-astronaut-aboard-international-space-station

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country.  Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

* Friday through Sunday, 12-14 September 2014 – ARRL Southwestern
Division Convention 2014 in San Diego CA (near Montgomery Field and I-
805/CA-163 interchange)
* Sunday, 25 October 2014 – Hamfest Chattanooga 2014 in Chattanooga
TN (Alhambra Center, near TN-320 and I-75 exit 3)
* Saturday, 8 November 2014 – Tucson Hamfest 2014 in Marana AZ
(along I-10 west frontage road, east of exit 236)
* Saturday, 6 December 2014 – Superstition Superfest 2014 in Mesa
AZ (Mesa Community College, Dobson Road between Southern Avenue & US-
60 exit 177)
* Saturday, 10 January 2015 – Thunderbird Hamfest in Phoenix AZ
(43rd Avenue, between Greenway and Bell Roads)
* Friday and Saturday, 20-21 February 2015 – Yuma Hamfest in Yuma
AZ (Yuma County Fairgrounds, 32nd Street between Pacific Avenue &
Avenue 3E, south of I-8 exit 3)

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Upcoming Contacts

* A direct contact via 4U1ITU with students at Institut Florimont,
Petit-Lancy, Switzerland is scheduled for Wed 2014-09-17
08:17:28 UTC 88 deg.

To celebrate ESA’s 50th anniversary, an audience comprised of
students from several countries will gather in the International
Conference Centre Geneva (CICG).

The nearby ITU (International Telecommunications Union) Headquarters
hosts the amateur radio station 4U1ITU. This ARISS contact will be
operated by the station’s trustee Attila Matas (HB9IAJ / OM1AM).

About 20 VIPs will be present in the 4U1ITU radio room (the “shack”
in Ham parlance). Via a video link, the audience in the CICG will
participate in the event.

Latest News

* September 9, 2014

A direct contact with students at Lanier Middle School and Lanier
Cluster Schools in Sugar Hill, GA, USA  via W4GR was successful at
11:16:25 UTC 83 deg.

Read and listen to a local media report about the contact:

http://www.gwinnettdailypost.com/news/2014/sep/09/radio-contact-
allows-lanier-students-to-talk-with/

Welcome to the Lanier Cluster, home of the Longhorns! We are a group
of schools with a common goal: Learn, Lead, Succeed. We are comprised
of one special needs preschool (The Buice School), three elementary
schools (Sugar Hill Elementary, Sycamore Elementary, White Oak
Elementary), one middle school (Lanier Middle), and one high school
(Lanier High). Our schools are located in the greater Atlanta metro
area in the largest school district in Georgia. Our schools and
cluster are named after nearby Lake Lanier, which part of the
Chattahoochee River system.

Our schools strive to create authentic learning environments for our
students. Towards that end, our elementary schools, Lanier Middle,
and Lanier High have project based learning programs for students. At
Lanier High, students choose to be a part of a school within a school
(academy model) as we guide students towards career and college
readiness. Lanier High was also recently certified as a Georgia STEM
high school, the only all-inclusive, traditional high school in
Georgia that has received this STEM certification.

Our students are excited about science and space exploration. They
have participated in regional and state science fairs, designed an
experiment flown in microgravity, and chatted with a NASA Earth
scientist live on NASA TV. They have presented at conferences,
participated in robotics and app challenge events, and even won an
Emmy for work on a 3D computer animation for a PBS documentary. The
students of Lanier Cluster are excited to be a part of this ARISS
contact!

September 8, 2014

A direct contact with students at St. Joan of Arc  School, Lisle,
IL, USA via K9LEZ  was successful  at 18:34:45 UTC 84 deg. Students
interviewed astronaut Alexander Gerst KF5ONO.

Listen to a local media report:
http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2014/09/08/students-at-lisle-school-chat-
with-astronaut-aboard-international-space-station/

St. Joan of Arc Catholic School is located in Lisle, Illinois, a
western suburb of Chicago. We are a pre-K to 8th grade school with
about 600 students. St. Joan provides an educational environment
which grants each student access to the highest quality and richest
variety of integrated educational experiences within our means. We
are committed to preparing our students to think critically and
become confident, sensitive, Christian leaders capable of adapting
and contributing to their community. Our school was awarded the
National Blue Ribbon Award for Academic Excellence in 2011. Our
school was named an IMSA (Illinios Math and Science Academy) Fusion
School in 2012. Our school participated in NASA’s microgravity
program through the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas in 2013.
The teachers directly involves in this contact completed the American
Radio Relay League’s (ARRL) summer teacher institute program and are
working with local radio amateurs to successfully complete this
contact and to provide additional opportunities to our classrooms.

September 5, 2014

A direct contact with students in St. Petersburg, Russia was
successful 2014-09-05 10:00 UTC.  No other details are available at
this time.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Keith, W5IU and Charlie, AJ9N for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

*Patrick Stoddard in October QST

See AMSAT’s own, Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK on page 79 of October’s
QST. The digital version is available online at
http://www.arrl.org

[ANS thanks the ARRL for the above information]

*Share your Experience

There are lots of hamfests that occur every month. Please try to get
out and share your experiences. I attended the SFTARC hamfest on
Saturday, September 13, 2014 in Gardner, KS. Randy, KD0HKD, gave a
presentation and made a few contacts including one lady’s first satellite
QSO. My point is that with the new Fox-1 series of satellites being
launched next year, the opportunity to welcome new members and
operators is increasing. Let’s begin attracting new membership by
being present.

[ANS thanks Joe, K6WAO for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org